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House panel sends bill on small airplane certification requirements to full House
The Wichita Eagle
The Small Airplane Revitalization Act reached a major milestone when it was unanimously passed out of the House Transportation Infrastructure Committee. It now goes to the House of Representatives for consideration. The bill calls for the Federal Aviation Administration to reorganize certification requirements to streamline the approval of safety advancements.
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FAA to increase US pilot training in wake of Asiana crash
Los Angeles Times
Under political pressure to act in the wake of the San Francisco jet crash, federal authorities announced they will enact new aviation safety rules, including a requirement for increased training of U.S. pilots. While the new rules would apply only to pilots on U.S. passenger and cargo airlines, a group of lawmakers sought to use the crash-landing of a South Korean jetliner to call attention to aviation safety and put pressure on the FAA to complete work on rules that grew out of a 2009 plane crash near Buffalo, N.Y.
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Plan to cut bird strikes doesn't lure the public
Jackson Hole News & Guide
Jackson Hole Airport in Jackson Hole, Wyo., has wrapped up the first phase of teaching the public about plans for reducing bird strikes. Not much of the public showed up. Airport and Grand Teton National Park officials and sage grouse biologists were at Snow King Resort for a meeting on the airport's wildlife hazard management plan.
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Planes may be able to land on Lake Mitchell in South Dakota
KDLT-TV
When South Dakota's Lake Mitchell was created, they probably had no idea that planes would someday want to land on its surface. That idea is now being brought up in Mitchell City Council meetings, where an amendment is proposed to allow planes less than 10,000 pounds, and who stay clear of houses by 500 feet, to take-off and land on the lake.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Nebraska pilot uses wreckage to 'reverse engineer' unique plane (Grant Tribune Sentinel)
Aviation school owner says New York state audits driving him out of business (The Batavian)
Defeating dehydration (By Frederick E. Tilton, M.D.; FAA Federal Air Surgeon)
Hobie sunglasses discount available (I Fly America)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Taking flight! Teen becomes youngest licensed plane and copter pilot
Today
Some teens use their summer vacations to sunbathe, play video games, watch TV or sleep. But one 17-year-old in New Hampshire really has his head in the clouds. Robert Pinksten attained a dizzying new record: He became the youngest person in aviation history to obtain licenses to pilot both helicopters and private airplanes. He qualified for his helicopter license on July 2 — his 17th birthday — and then completed requirements for his private pilot license nine days later.
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Flying high: Do you have what it takes?
by: Frederick E. Tilton; Federal Air Surgeon
Reprinted with permission from FAA Safety Briefing
No, we're not talking about Top Gun or the Right Stuff-type flying skills. We’re talking about air to breathe and, more specifically, oxygen. You know the rules: A pilot must use supplemental oxygen when flying at 12,500 feet MSL for more than 30 minutes and continuously above 14,000 feet MSL. The point is to prevent hypoxia, which can incapacitate the pilot first by impairing judgment and perception of danger and eventually by rendering the individual unconscious (or worse). Knowing these rules is sufficient to pass a knowledge test, but the real-life test requires a solid understanding of how to use supplemental oxygen equipment correctly, effectively, and safely.

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IFA pilot quiz — Aviation firsts
I Fly America
We always remember our first flight, our first solo or our first passenger. What other firsts do you remember in aviation? Caution: This one is not easy.

1. The Wright Brothers made four flights that first day in 1903. How far did the longest flight travel in the air?
    a. 70 feet
    b. Just more than a half mile
    c. Just less than a quarter mile
2. In what year did the first hydroplane take off from the water, fly and successfully land on its pontoons?
    a. 1910
    b. 1912
    c. 1914
Continue the quiz and find out the answers.

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Solar-powered aircraft completes cross-US journey
TechHive
A one-of-a-kind solar-powered aircraft completed a two-month journey across the United States when it landed at New York's JFK Airport. The landing came several hours earlier than planned because of a tear that developed in the delicate wing of the aircraft.

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4 to 19 seater hybrid aircraft to enter commercial market by 2020
NextBigFuture.com
"Within this decade, we will certainly see hybrid electric aircraft entering the market," says Frank Anton, who heads the hybrid aircraft efforts at Siemens. Four-seat hybrid aircraft are likely within that time frame, Anton says.

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FAA imposes user fees on airshows
AINonline
Airshows in the U.S., reeling from widespread cancellations and diminished attendance following the withdrawal of U.S. military demonstration teams, are now facing a new financial hurdle: User fees from the FAA. The Pentagon blamed the withdrawal of its jet demonstration teams on cutbacks.

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IN THE NEWS


Recycling aircraft: No small job
Construction Equipment Guide
Airplanes don't fly forever, so what happens to them when they no longer are airworthy? That was the question that popped into the head of Chip Giordano a decade ago. He pursued an answer and turned it into a career. "Where does a plane go when its flying days are done? It goes somewhere," Giordano asked himself and looked for an answer. Today, he is the owner of Aircraft Demolition and Recycling, a Wellington, Fla., company that has taken off like the planes he demolishes once did.
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The past and future of northland aviation meet at festival
Northland's Newscenter
This helicopter is part of a celebration of a century of Twin Ports, Minn., aviation. The chopper is helping recreate the Lark of Duluth festival that took place here a hundred years ago. "It's a remake of the original one in 1913. That festival lasted six weeks." said Tom Betts.
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Small plane manufacturer setting up in Vermont
Beaumont Enterprise
A German light aircraft manufacturer is moving operations to the Newport State Airport creating 25 jobs, according to Vermont officials. Gov. Peter Shumlin and the owners of the Jay Peak resort who are leading an economic charge designed to create jobs in Vermont, announced the expansion.
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Ike's Air Force One-type plane joins air museum collection
The Gilmer Mirror
An Aero Commander 685 arrived at Fox Stephens Field, fresh from Cheyenne, Wyo., where Harold "Chris" Christensen had ridden with Steve Dean to teach the new owner some of the quirks of the latest addition to the Flight of the Phoenix Museum at the Gilmer airport in Gilmer, Texas.
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Vermont airport lands small airplane manufacturer
WCAX-TV
The Newport State Airport in Newport, Vt., is taking off. The owners of Jay Peak and Governor Peter Shumlin announced a development plan for the airport estimated at $20 million. German company Flight Design will expand to the Northeast Kingdom, building and shipping its two-seater plane called CTLS. The company will also open a flight training center using three of the small planes. The goal — lure people in for a vacation where they can learn to fly.
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University of Dubuque flight school touts training after Asiana crash
KCRG-TV
Instructors at the University of Dubuque's Aviation School say the Asiana crash is an example of why training is so important across plane models and say every pilot needs repetitive training on each and every single plane they fly. The pre-flight inspection isn't exactly what University of Dubuque Aviation student, Thomas O'Keefe pictured when he first dreamed of becoming a pilot, but he knows the routine is critical.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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