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FAA: Hangars no place for homebuilders
AVweb
The FAA says most of the work involved in building an airplane is a "non-aeronautical use" and it has singled out homebuilders in a new proposed policy statement. Policy on the Non-Aeronautical Use Of Airport Hangars says homebuilders will have to build the components of their projects elsewhere and can only move to a hangar for final assembly. Comments are being accepted until Sept. 5 and can be submitted online citing docket number FAA-2014-0463.
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New ultra-thin film may protect pilots from laser beams
CBC News
A University of Moncton physicist is hoping a new ultra-thin film, that can be applied to the windshield of commercial airplanes, may keep the skies safer by blocking laser beams that are being aimed at cockpits. According to the FBI, incidents of people aiming their lasers into airplane cockpits has risen by more than 1,000 percent since 2005. Pandurang Ashrit, a physicist and the director of the Thin Films and Photonics Research Group at the University of Moncton, specializes in working with super-thin materials.
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Earning his wings under the hood
Vineyard Gazette
Dan Wilson's weeks are almost always split in two. For three days, Wilson works in a World War II-era hangar at Katama Airfield in Edgartown, Massachusetts. For another three days, he works out of a more modern hangar at the Martha's Vineyard Airport. Sundays, he takes off, so to speak. A mechanic by trade but a pilot by passion, Wilson can be found roaming the skies when he's not busy taking a wrench to a faulty airplane engine or completing annual inspections.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Odd jobs: aerobatic pilot (WCAX-TV)
WWII veterans tell stories by historic planes (Coon Rapids Herald)
H2-OH! — How water and heat create haze, humidity and hurricanes (By James Williams)
Cockpit invention promises to boost pilot spatial awareness (Air Traffic Management)
Rising stars: 5 planes that will change aviation (FLYING)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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Report on heat dangers
I Fly America
Reprinted with permission of FAA Aviation News
From the IFR pilot holding for a clearance, to the air show pilot waiting to perform, or to the glider pilot working a hot summer thermal, each is at risk from the heat and more importantly, from the danger of not drinking enough water. Heat related problems can be as deadly to a pilot as the lack of oxygen. We seldom discuss heat problems and their effects on the ability of a pilot to control an aircraft in flight.

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IFA pilot quiz — Acronyms and abbreviations
I Fly America
With wide usage of computers and iPads, today's writings are more and more in acronyms and abbreviations. As a pilot reads and communicates, it is necessary to know what these letter combinations stand for. Here are a few to test yourself, some old and some new. These are not easy unless you have learned them well. Test yourself.

1. ADS-B
    a. Aircraft Design Series-Boeing
    b. Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast
    c. Altitude Differential Spacing-Broadcast
2. ERAM
    a. En Route Automatic Modernization
    b. Enter Restricted Area Management
    c. End Radar Area Monitoring
Continue the quiz and find out the answers.


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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
A century ago, a Pennsylvania man changed aviation
Washington Observer Reporter
As first lady Ellen Axson Wilson's life was slipping away inside the White House Aug. 6, 1914, due to the ravaging effects of kidney disease, DeLloyd Thompson was more than 1,000 miles away...

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Cessna introduces Turbo Skyhawk JT-A
FLYING
Two years after Cessna announced its intent to develop a diesel-powered Skylane 182, Textron Aviation announced at the opening day of AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, a similar modification program to the...

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This record-breaking electric plane stomps gas-powered Cessna
WIRED
When Chip Yates started working on his electric airplane in 2012, he wasn't trying to make conventional, gas-powered aircraft look slow. That hasn't changed, Yates says. "That..."

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IN THE NEWS


Continental introduces 310 hp diesel V6
FLYING
Continuing the rapid trend toward diesel power in light airplanes, Continental Motors launched the V6 CD 300, a 310 horsepower jet-A-burning engine that's due to hit the market in about two years. Continental has also dropped the Centurion name from its diesel line, which it acquired as part of its purchase of Thielert in Germany a year ago.
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Lead is still a threat
The Star Online
The amount of lead churned into the air by cars and factories has declined by more than 90 percent since the 1970s. Average concentrations of the toxic metal in children have plummeted almost as dramatically. But one industry stubbornly remains a hold-out in the decades-long push for a lead-free America. Piston-engined aircraft, which take off from airports large and small in every state, still run on leaded aviation fuel known as avgas.
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A century ago, a Pennsylvania man changed aviation
Washington Observer Reporter
As first lady Ellen Axson Wilson's life was slipping away inside the White House Aug. 6, 1914, due to the ravaging effects of kidney disease, DeLloyd Thompson was more than 1,000 miles away, donning a sheepskin suit in Overland Park, Kansas. Cold-weather apparel of that variety would, in most circumstances, have been unbearable and unnecessary on a typical summer's day in the community just outside Kansas City. But Thompson wouldn't long be on the ground and bearing the brunt of the August sun.
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