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Professor lands plane on Colorado road after engine failure
KMGH-TV
The pilot who landed a single engine plane on a road in Adams County, Colorado, is a local aviation professor. Tonya Gatlin is a teacher at Metro State and the woman who helped train Colorado astronaut Steve Swanson, who is now aboard the International Space Station. Gatlin worked as an astronaut trainer at Johnson Space Center in Houston. Gatlin is also a flight instructor and credits the recent safe landing on a highway to training and instinct from emergency training drills over the years.
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The murky world of avgas prices
AVweb
According to author Paul Bertorelli: If I were to break down the quest for an unleaded avgas into seasons, I think we're in the long, hot summer phase. From here until two years from now, progress may be like watching the grass grow. At AirVenture last month, the only meaningful activity was that Shell showed up to talk about its entry in the 100-octane sweepstakes without revealing much detail.
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91-year-old World War II pilot back in the skies
Provo Daily Herald
Keith Richardson is right back where he started — almost. Richardson started his flying career as a young trainee in the U.S. Navy. He was sent to Provo, Utah, to learn how to fly. BYU at that time was still BY Academy and filled a small area at 500 North and University Avenue, plus one building on the upper campus, the Smith Building. Richardson ate his meals in the cafeteria in the Smith Building, and learned to fly at the Provo Airport.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Wisconsin performer pilot lands for the last time (WKBT-TV)
FAA: Hangars no place for homebuilders (AVweb)
BendixKing launches inflight Internet service (FLYING)

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FROM I FLY AMERICA


You may be paying too much for aircraft insurance
I Fly America
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Thunderstorms/Pilots/AFSS/ and ATC
By Michael Lenz
Reprinted with permission from FAA Aviation News
An airborne encounter with a thunderstorm can result in a badly shaken pilot at best or a damaged aircraft or fatal accident at worst. Most of us know better than to fly blindly into convective weather, and we successfully avoid such encounters, but enough accidents bear witness to the fact that some pilots do manage to get themselves into trouble. In the majority of those causes, the facts show that the pilot inadvertently penetrated an area of severe convective weather. We might ask ourselves, why a pilot would fly into a thunderstorm? Why didn’t the pilot know there was a thunderstorm there?

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IFA pilot quiz — Legal and safety measures
I Fly America
Whether flying regularly or getting back in the air after an extended period, it is smart to bone up on essential legal and safety measures. These questions will test your memory and perhaps suggest some refresher study.

1. Hypoxia usually does not occur in a normally healthy person below what altitude?
    a. 15,000 feet
    b. 12,000 feet
    c. 9,000 feet

2. The FAA defines a near mid-air collision as when two or more aircraft come closer than what distance?
    a. One-half mile
    b. 500 feet
    c. One mile

Continue the quiz and find out the answers.

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Like IFA on Facebook!
I Fly America
Be sure to visit I Fly America on Facebook. You will be able to read the latest news from IFA, network with other IFA members, and connect with fellow aviators by sharing your favorite aviation photos and flying destinations. Make sure to "Share" our information with your friends and remember to "Like" us.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
The murky world of avgas prices
AVweb
According to author Paul Bertorelli: If I were to break down the quest for an unleaded avgas into seasons, I think we're in the long, hot summer phase. From here until two years from now, progress may be like watching...

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Questions continue about lithium batteries
AVweb
New rules recently have addressed the safety of shipping lithium batteries in air cargo, but a recent newspaper story raised questions about their use in electronic devices in the cockpit of passenger airplanes.

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Diesel engines emerging as new tech for future of GA aircraft
PR Newswire via Aviation Pros
With several major aircraft and engine manufacturers recently announcing the development of new diesel aircraft engines, the general aviation industry in the U.S. appears to be entering a...

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IN THE NEWS


Taking wing: The airfield that time forgot
FLYING
According to author Sam Weigel: Sunshine! It feels so foreign, so exotic and so wonderful! I know that you are comfortably ensconced in the warm embrace of summer, but back here in late April, the upper Midwest is just now escaping the clutches of a memorably brutal winter. My home airport, Airlake, is bursting to life from its sleepy state of semihibernation.
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Heater AD targets GA aircraft
AVweb
A new proposed airworthiness directive issued by the FAA affects up to 6,000 general aviation aircraft, mostly — but not limited to — Pipers and Cessnas, equipped with Meggitt (Troy) Inc. combustion heaters. The required inspections would cost about $425, the FAA said, and if repairs are needed, the cost could rise above $6,000.
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Western Australia helo pilot saves whale
AVweb
A helicopter tourism pilot used his Robinson R44 helicopter to scare a shark away from a calving whale along the west coast of Australia. Sean Blocksidge, proprietor of Wild Blue Helicopters of Margaret River, Western Australia, was on a flight with his friend and company pilot Brett Campany to do some aerial photography of the region, when they stumbled upon an incredible scene.
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AirPooler challenges FAA ride-sharing decision
FLYING
Steve Lewis, an MIT graduate and one of the founders of aircraft ride-sharing site AirPooler, says the startup will press the FAA for further clarification of a letter the agency sent that effectively pulled the plug on services that are designed to link private pilots with passengers headed for the same destination. The problem with the FAA's position, Lewis says, is the agency's use of a draft policy written in 1963 to contend that cost-sharing through sites like AirPooler constitutes compensation and "holding out" as a commercial air carrier.
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