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Mashpee Cessna pilot still flying at 91
Cape Cod Times
Bob MacDonald's life took off, literally, when he took a flying lesson, earned his pilot's license and bought a Cessna Skyhawk 172SP — at age 76. That was in 1999, on the eve of the new millennium. This year, MacDonald checked in to let us know that, at age 91, he still flies out of Barnstable Municipal Airport in Hyannis, Massachusetts, regularly. And he's not alone. MacDonald says there are more than 100 certified pilots between the ages of 90 and 100.
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GAMA pushing FAA on Part 23 rewrite
AVweb
Last July, an FAA spokesperson gave stunning testimony before Congress — she said that the FAA was going to miss its December 2015 deadline for the rewrite of FAR Part 23 to simplify small aircraft certification by at least two years. As would be expected, the aviation community expressed its fury. Members of Congress sent letters to the FAA demanding that it comply with the law — and it wasn't just any law.
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FAA selects fuels for testing to get the lead out of general aviation fuel
Federal Aviation Administration via Aviation Pros
The U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration announced it has selected four unleaded fuels for the first phase of testing at the FAA's William J. Hughes Technical Center. The goal is for government and industry to work together to have a new unleaded fuel that reduces lead emissions for general aviation by 2018. Shell and TOTAL, with one fuel each, and Swift Fuels, with two fuels, will now work with the FAA on phase-one testing, which will begin this fall and conclude in fall 2015.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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How important is a pilot's 1st airplane?
Air & Space Magazine
The first flight in my first logbook is dated Dec. 5, 1970, and says I had .8 hour of dual instruction at the Teterboro School of Aeronautics in New Jersey with an instructor whose name I can't remember and whose signature I can't make out. Under remarks, he wrote "FAM FLT" — a familiarization flight, which we'd made in a Cessna 150. One thing I do remember vividly is a feeling of queasiness that made me wonder whether I was cut out for flying. Air is unpredictable. Wind gusts produce bumps, and during the earliest phases of flight training, students can feel uncomfortable.
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FROM I FLY AMERICA


Survival basics
By Brett C. Stoffel via I Fly America
Reprinted with permission from Brett Stoffel
The basics of survival are often misunderstood and that may lead to problems in an emergency. Is there a magic survival formula? We at ERI think so. Not so much "magic" but a reliable way to approach survival that ensures a survivor's focus on what someone really needs to survive. Just remember the following: PMA + 98.6 = BCS. Positive Mental Attitude (PMA) plus 98.6 (the generic body's ideal core temperature in Fahrenheit) equals the Best Chance for Survival (BCS). Or stated more plainly, the proper psychology plus the right focus on physiology gives us the best chance at making it through a tough ordeal. Notice that the formula does not guarantee survival, rather gives the best chances for it.

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Get the card every aviator needs
I Fly America
Announcing the I Fly America® American Express® Card issued by First Bankcard®, a division of First National Bank of Omaha. IFA is always on the watch for programs and services that will benefit its members and we are excited to tell you about a new partnership we have with First Bankcard® and American Express® to create the I Fly America Card, specifically with you in mind.
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Accident report — loss of engine leads to loss of control — Smith Aerostar
I Fly America
A Smith Aerostar operated by a commercial pilot, collided with the ground following a loss of power in one engine during initial climb after takeoff from Charleston Executive Airport, Johns Island, South Carolina. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91 with no flight plan filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The commercial pilot and the pilot-rated passenger received fatal injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage from impact and from post-impact fire. The flight departed Charleston Executive Airport, Johns Island, South Carolina, about 1524.
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Join IFA on Facebook!
I Fly America
Access IFA through Facebook. You will be able to read the latest news from IFA, network with other IFA members, and connect with fellow aviators by sharing your favorite aviation photos and flying destinations.

If you're not already using Facebook, it's easy to set up your own free account. And, once you’re on Facebook, and accessing the IFA page, you can easily invite your friends to join you as well. Visit us on Facebook and make sure to "Like" us today!

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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How important is a pilot's 1st airplane?
Air & Space Magazine
The first flight in my first logbook is dated Dec. 5, 1970, and says I had .8 hour of dual instruction at the Teterboro School of Aeronautics in New Jersey with an instructor whose name I can't remember and whose...

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Addressing the media's unreasonable fear of flying
By Ryan Clark
USA Today recently ran a three-part series of articles that delved into the issue of general aviation safety. The author, Thomas Frank, claimed that general aviation is inherently dangerous and unsafe...

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Accident report — Failure of pilot to maintain VMC, results in fatal crash — Cessna 421C
I Fly America
About 1445 Eastern Standard Time, a Cessna 421C crashed shortly after takeoff from the Space Center Executive Airport, Titusville, Florida, while on a...

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IN THE NEWS


Overcoming disabilities, pilot impresses his peers
The Wichita Eagle
The first time Randy Green interviewed about becoming the company's pilot, it was over the phone. Green knew he had to tell his prospective boss that he was born without hands or feet. He didn't want to waste the man's time. "How do you fly?" he was asked. "The same as everybody else does, only better," he replied. He got the job. He was hired as a corporate pilot by Stuart B. Millner and Associates of Union, Missouri, which markets, appraises and sells assets from industrial facilities, power plants and mines.
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A flight in a Skycatcher
Air & Space Magazine
Cessna's 162 Skycatcher is vastly different from its forebears, but with its gentle handling and good manners, it too is a very light airplane that won't frighten new pilots. The interior of the airplane feels more like an industrial space restyled as a loft apartment, as opposed to the Cessna 150/152, which aspires to feel like a penthouse suite. And the 162 is considerably more spacious than the older trainers.
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Texas pilot, 89, makes final flight, donates plane
The Associated Press via Houston Chronicle
Cecil Ingram was 10 days past his 16th birthday when he flew an airplane solo for the first time. "I walked home, and everybody I saw on the street, I told everybody I'd flown an airplane," Ingram recalled. "I was so proud of myself." The now 89-year-old Ingram piloted his final flight from Dalhart to Amarillo, Texas, in a 1946 ERCO Ercoupe he donated on arrival to Texas Air & Space Museum at Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport.
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Volcanoes vs. Airplanes: How big is the risk?
Popular Mechanics
Volcanic activity on opposite sides of the globe has put airlines on alert and threatened to disrupt air travel. However, thanks to advances in detection technology, experts say planes are now safer from the risk of volcanic eruptions than they’ve ever been. The technology, known as AVOID (Airborne Volcanic Object Imaging Detector), was developed by Norway's Nicarnia Aviation, and is attached to the aircraft much like the now-standard weather radar.
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Planes a graphic passion for some vendors
Galesburg Register-Mail
Every year at Galesburg, Illinois', Stearman Fly-In there is a chance to buy buttons, shirts, hats, posters, etc., with airplane designs. The artists and designers are just as passionate about aircraft and flying as the pilots themselves. Dennis Harbin of Rag Bag Aero Works from Louisa, Virginia, completely designs hats, shirts and banners from his home as a full-time business. Harbin has been involved with planes since the 1960s working as an aerospace engineer and aircraft mechanic.
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The restoration of a PBY Catalina
AirlineReporter
Sanford Seacoast Regional Airport is a municipally-owned airport located in Sanford, Maine. It is home to a fixed wing flight school, rotary wing flight school, a school specializing in ATP licenses, as well as a full host of FBO services. There is also an excellent diner to facilitate the infamous $100 hamburger. KSFM was originally a Naval Auxiliary Airfield during World War II, built at the same time as three others in the state. It has also been the host to Presidential aircraft, as both Bush administrations were keen to visit Kennbunkport.
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