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National aviation organizations applaud Kansas governor for declaring September 'Aviation Appreciation Month'
Aviation Pros
National aviation organizations applauded Kansas Governor Sam Brownback's proclamation of September as "Aviation Appreciation Month." In Kansas, general aviation accounts for $7.1 billion in economic activity each year and the aviation industry supports more than 47,000 jobs statewide. The governor's proclamation will be presented at the Wichita Aero Club Luncheon, which will be followed by the Kansas Aviation Expo.
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Navy aviators assist civilian pilot
Nevada Appeal
Three naval aviators assigned to Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center assisted a civilian pilot in arriving safely to the Fallon Municipal Airport. Aviators Lt. Shawn Navinskey, Lt. Johnathan Sheater and Lt. Matthew Sullivan were on their way back to the runway at Naval Air Station Fallon when the base air traffic controllers notified them of a civilian pilot, James Epperson, in military air space.
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Don't demonize the machine
By Mark Huber
In late August, another Eurocopter Super Puma crashed into the North Sea near the United Kingdom. Four of those aboard died. Over the last several years, a handful of ditchings/crashes of this model have been tied to flaws in the design of its main rotor gearbox lubrication system and a batch of replacement main rotor shafts. The latest incident has resulted in a new Facebook page entitled "Destroy the Super Pumas," which gained 32,000 "likes" in three days. All this raises the question: When several helicopters of the same make/model crash, is it always right to blame the machine?
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Diabetics may still put flying in their diets (by: Charlie Spence, Aviation Writer and IFA Member)
World War II-era planes land in Iowa (Oskaloosa Herald)
Pilot talks laser pointer incident (WKYT-TV)

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Australian teenager rewrites aviation history
ABC Broken Hill
World record-breaking Australian teenager Ryan Campbell hopes his efforts in becoming the youngest person to fly a single-engine aircraft around the world will inspire a new generation of young pilots. Speaking from Broken Hill, New South Wales, while preparing for the 34th and final leg of his mammoth journey, Ryan described his 24,000 nautical mile odyssey through 15 countries as "surreal."
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FROM I FLY AMERICA


Slow, steady, sure — Avoiding loss of control in maneuvering flight
by: Susan Parson
Reprinted with permission from FAA Safety Briefing
Pilot lore is replete with reminders about the importance of airspeed. We hear "speed is life." Instructors chant a "watch your airspeed" mantra. Comedians quip that flying requires only two things: airspeed (there it is again) and money. Airspeed is a frequent topic because sufficient airspeed is essential to generating the lift needed to establish and maintain flight. We also hear about airspeed for tragic reasons: Loss of control in maneuvering flight, the number one cause of fatal general aviation accidents, often results from inattention to airspeed.

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Competitive and affordable aircraft financing available
I Fly America
The IFA Aircraft Finance Program is offered through a leading aircraft financing company that specializes in financing for general aviation and business aircraft nationwide. The program provides fast, easy and competitive financing and refinancing for new and used aircraft, from single engine pistons to twins and light jets, including Light Sport Aircraft, from $50,000 up to over $5 million in value. Learn more and receive a no-obligation quote!
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Join IFA on Facebook!
I Fly America
Access IFA through Facebook. You will be able to read the latest news from IFA, network with other IFA members, and connect with fellow aviators by sharing your favorite aviation photos and flying destinations.

If you're not already using Facebook, it's easy to set up your own free account. And, once you’re on Facebook, and accessing the IFA page, you can easily invite your friends to join you as well. Visit us on Facebook and make sure to "Like" us today!

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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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Report: 5-year-old Chinese boy youngest pilot to fly a light airplane
IBN Live
A five-year-old Chinese boy has become the youngest person ever to fly a light airplane single-handed, covering a distance of 30 km, it has been claimed. The boy nicknamed Duoduo, flew a total 47 minutes in two flights around the Beijing Wildlife Zoo in Gu'an county, according to his father, He Liesheng.

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Georgia company helps 97-year-old live out her dream to fly again
Marietta Daily Journal
Vilma Hofer was the first woman pilot licensed to fly solo in Czechoslovakia more than 70 years ago, and her love of flying has never wavered. Thanks to a Kennesaw, Ga., company in the business of making dreams come true, she was able to take to the air again at age 97, flying over the skies of Cobb County.

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Online courses offer advanced aviation education, for free
AVweb
If you're interested in airplanes and wish you knew more about aerodynamics — or air traffic control, space policy, satellite engineering or airline management — you can study all of those topics and more, for free, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, via their OpenCourseware website.

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NTSB: Disorientation may have led to crash
The Detroit News
Disorientation may have played a role in the crash that killed a Michigan pilot who is credited with helping to revolutionize NASCAR racing, according to an NTSB report. Steve Bown of Commerce Township and his companion, Karyn Martin, died when the plane Bown was piloting crashed into High Rock Lake in Salisbury, N.C.
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Brothers help keep museum, air show soaring
The Brownsville Herald via The Monitor
Many people know and love the Commemorative Air Force Museum and the Air Fiesta Air Show in Brownsville, Texas, but many people don't know the people who put in an immense amount of work to produce the air show. The two men who have engineered the air show are brothers David Hughston and Chris Hughston. Both have had an interest in flying since they were young. David Hughston said that he and his brother grew up around airplanes.
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IN THE NEWS


Ultralight aviator being inducted into hall of fame
Highlands Today
Soaring "low and slow" over Florida's Lake Istokpoka in the open cockpit of a Lockwood AirCam, it is easy to understand the popularity of this camera plane designed by ultralight aviation pioneer Philip Lockwood. The high-winged, twin engine aircraft was surprising quiet as it glided gently past the shoreline, passing fisherman and wildlife who seemed unaware of the plane's presence.
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Texas police unveil high-performance helicopter
Austin American-Statesman via Aviation Pros
There's a new Air One in town. Austin, Texas, police unveiled a $3.75 million helicopter that will help fight crime and fires in the area. The six-seat Air One, a Eurocopter AS350 B3e, is outfitted with military grade equipment, from a 17-inch monitor to an infrared thermal imaging system to track suspects or stolen goods. It is expected to be a game changer, city and police officials said.
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Aerial demos highlight grand opening of Van Nuys Airport runway
Avioation Pros
More than 300 business, community and aviation industry representatives joined with Los Angeles World Airport officials to open Van Nuys Airport's newly improved main runway, 16R. The $20.5 million, seven-month plan to modernize the airport's 8,000-foot primary runway marks the largest maintenance project conducted at the airport in over 50 years.
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Arado 196 — best in class?
Seattle Post Intelligencer
Arado's Ar 196 served primarily in the Kreigsmarine (German Navy) during World War II as a reconnaissance seaplane. Assigned to warships, such as the Admiral Hipper and the Prinz Eugen, the Ar 196 also operated from shore based units for patrolling duties as well as special insertion duties. Prototypes were built in both single pontoon and twin float versions with the final production selection being the twin float design since this type had better handling behavior on the water.
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MU-2 pilots celebrate 50-year milestone during round-the-world journey
AINonline
Fifty years ago on Sept. 14, 1963, a pair of test pilots for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries pushed the power levers forward and a uniquely designed twin-engine turboprop raced down the runway and lifted into the sky. Powered by two Turbomeca Astazou turboshafts, the XMU-2, as the prototype was designated, spawned the production version, the Garrett TPE331-powered MU-2, of which about 290 are still flying worldwide.
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