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FAA statement-update on chicago air traffic facility
FAA
FAA air traffic controllers continued to handle high volumes of traffic into and out of Chicago-area airports. The number of arrivals and departures at O'Hare were more than 90 percent of the two-month average, while total operations at Midway reached more than 95 percent. By noon CDT, the number of flights at the two airports was running almost 95 percent of the two-month average for a Sunday.
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Jerrie Mock, 1st solo female pilot to circumnavigate globe
The New York Times via St. Paul Pioneer-Press
Jerrie Mock, who as a relatively untested pilot accomplished in 1964 what Amelia Earhart could not, becoming the first woman to fly solo around the world, died recently at her home in Quincy, Florida. She was 88. Her grandson Chris Flocken confirmed her death.
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Female aviation pioneer inducted into hall of fame
The Denver Post
Emily Howell Warner's name is attached to many honors and many "firsts." First woman member of the Air Line Pilots Association, the largest pilots union in the world. First leader of the first all-female Continental Airlines flight crew. First woman hired as a pilot by a U.S. commercial airline and the first female captain. Recently, there was an addition to her long list of honors: induction into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in Dayton, Ohio.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

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FROM I FLY AMERICA


The right stuff — What kind of medical must I hold?
By James Williams
Reprinted with permission by FAA Aviation News
You have probably seen or heard about the kind of "right stuff" physical perfection required of early astronauts and, for that matter, the earliest aviators obliged to obtain a medical certificate. In both cases, the standards were such that many of today's active airmen might have never passed the exam.

Fortunately, things are different now. The standards recognize that few of us are perfect physical specimens, and they also recognize that the level of certification required for personal recreational flying is different from that needed to command a large passenger airliner. Flexibility is good, but the range of available options can sometimes raise questions.

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Competitive and affordable aircraft financing available
I Fly America
The IFA Aircraft Finance Program is offered through a leading aircraft financing company that specializes in financing for general aviation and business aircraft nationwide. The program provides fast, easy and competitive financing and refinancing for new and used aircraft, from single engine pistons to twins and light jets, including Light Sport Aircraft, from $50,000 up to over $5 million in value. Learn more and receive a no-obligation quote!
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IFA pilot quiz — People in aviation
I Fly America
There have been many interesting persons who performed special activities in aviation history. See how many you can identify. Caution: it will not be easy.

1. What two men formed one company, then couldn't agree on design and split to form two companies?
    a. W.T. Piper and G. Bellanca
    b. Clyde Cessna and Walter Beech
    c. Walter Beech and William Boeing

2. The first aircraft built in the United States was a glider. Who built it?
    a. Samuel Langley in 1901
    b. Wilbur Wright in 1899
    c. Otto Lilienthal in 1894

Continue the quiz and find out the answers.

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Accident Report — Takeoff stall fatal for two — Grumman American AA-1A
I Fly America
At 1346 Central Standard Time, a Grumman American AA-1A single-engine airplane was destroyed upon impact with terrain following a loss of control during initial takeoff climb near Shreveport, Louisiana. The non-instrument rated private pilot and his passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. No flight plan was filed for the local flight that originated as a flight of two airplanes, from the Shreveport Downtown Airport (DTN) at 1342.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
The right stuff — What kind of medical must I hold?
By James Williams
Reprinted with permission by FAA Aviation News
You have probably seen or heard about the kind of "right stuff" physical perfection required of early astronauts and, for that matter, the earliest aviators...


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Top 10 signs you (or your airplane) may be in trouble
By Tom Hoffmann
Reprinted with permission from FAA Safety Briefing
Top 10 lists are featured in late-night television jokes, rank the year's best movies, and even suggest the most influential minds among us. Just about...


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Veteran pilot avoids beach crowd, lands small plane in Hawaii ocean
The Associated Press via Ottawa Citizen
A former Alaska bush pilot safely avoided beachgoers when he crash-landed his small airplane in the ocean just off a beach on Oahu's North Shore in Hawaii...

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IN THE NEWS


General aviation flights declining in New York, nationwide
Newsday
Every Wednesday, a friendly pilot landed at Long Island MacArthur Airport with bagels and coffee to share with the mechanics at Edward Libassi's shop. On Thursdays, another pilot arrived with hot cross buns. Those social drop-ins have largely ended — one of the many signs of a major decline in general aviation flights on Long Island and nationwide that has spanned nearly 15 years. The prolonged downturn has Libassi, longtime owner of A&P Aircraft Maintenance, longing for the bustling days of old.
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Can this airport be saved?
Air & Space Magazine
On a hot afternoon in August 1945, the voice of Donald Douglas boomed over loudspeakers in the cavernous assembly buildings of the Douglas Aircraft Corporation at California's Santa Monica Airport. All up and down the queues of C-47 Gooney Birds and A-26 Invaders, rivet guns and impact wrenches fell silent as Douglas informed the first shift that World War II was over. Japan had surrendered. "We all put down our tools and streamed out onto Ocean Park Boulevard, laughing and singing and hugging each other," one employee recalled in a book on the manufacturer.
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Flying roadster to be unveiled
AVweb
The latest version of the flying car from AeroMobil, "3.0," referred to as the Flying Roadster, will be displayed to the public for the first time at the Pioneers Festival in Vienna, Austria. Developed in Slovakia, the sleek two-place prototype evolved from the AeroMobil 2.5, which has flown. Powered by a Rotax 912 engine swinging a pusher prop, AeroMobil has published some predicted performance numbers: Max speed of 124 mph, stall speed 40 mph, range 430 miles and fuel consumption of 15 liters per hour.
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Oklahoma oilman brings classic 'Corsair' fighter plane to Tulsa
KOTV-TV
When you ask Trent Latshaw what's the best thing about owning an F4U, he will struggle to put his answer into words. Latshaw, 61, has owned the Vought F4U-4 for about a year. He's gotten used to people telling him it's their favorite airplane, but he hasn't gotten used to the effect it has on him when he flies it. He probably never will. "I was flying home from Fort Worth a few weeks ago. It was about 7 p.m. and I was above the clouds with the sun off to the left. The sun was reflecting off the wing and the tips of the prop. 'How neat is this?' I asked myself. I'm flying a piece of history."
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Cessna boosts range of Citation Latitude
AINonline
Cessna announced improvements in expected range and runway performance for the Citation Latitude, basing its projections on data from the flight-test program for the new twinjet. The midsize jet's range is being extended by 200 nm, to 2,700 nm, at long-range cruise. In addition, the Latitude's takeoff distance has been shortened to 3,668 feet, down from a previously projected 4,030 feet.
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