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How do executives learn the vocabulary of their business?
Carol Heiberger
Vocabulary is how we communicate with one another. It's how we recognize competence; it's how we judge credibility. Yet every industry, every company, every project has its own jargon. Newly transferred, newly promoted and newly hired executives start their assignment with extensive knowledge based on education and experience. But they don't walk in with an intimate understanding of the business unit, its operations, its locations or its products — all represented by words that are precise.
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Why emotional quotient is key to your career success
eLearning Industry
Emotional Quotient (EQ) is the most under-rated phrase of the millennium. Emotional Intelligence is the sine qua non for success in the long term.
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3 myths about engineering talent in China and India
Harvard Business Review
Many big American R&D spenders have undergone a quiet transformation of their product development capabilities during the past decade that includes embedding Asian capabilities much closer to the core of their operation.
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Brain training doesn't give you smarts… except when it does
Scientific American
Recent articles have claimed brain training doesn't endow you instantly with genius IQ. The games you play just make you better at playing those same games. But as psychologists say, all of that gaming and brain training has "transfer effects."
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Study reveals mental cues, conditions that affect performance
Defense News
According to a study of neurophysiological factors that affect performance, in a team environment, performance is improved by more verbal interaction.
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Disclaimer: The articles that appear in Performance Digest are chosen from a variety of sources to reflect media coverage regarding human and organizational performance improvement. An article's inclusion in Performance Digest does not imply that the International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) endorses, supports, or verifies its contents or expressed opinions. Factual errors are the responsibility of the listed publication.

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