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As 2013 comes to a close, LDA would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of The LD Source, a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume next Thursday, Jan. 9.



 In the News

Not all reading disabilities are dyslexia
Vanderbilt University
A common reading disorder goes undiagnosed until it becomes problematic, according to the results of five years of study by researchers at Vanderbilt's Peabody College of education and human development in collaboration with the Kennedy Krieger Institute/Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Results of the study were recently published online by the National Institutes of Health. Dyslexia, a reading disorder in which a child confuses letters and struggles with sounding out words, has been the focus of much reading research.
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8 things to know about dyslexia
NBC News
Dr. Joseph Sirven, a contributor for NBC News, writes: "My parents instilled in me the value of education in providing opportunities in life. As a doctor, preventing and solving medical problems that can disrupt education at an early age is something I believe we both as individuals and as members of the Latino community must address. Dyslexia is one of the most common learning disorders that can lead to problems with education, but if identified early, academic concerns can be potentially averted. Here are 8 things you need to know about this condition."
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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another. That is particularly important for students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. For years, the law has pushed schools and districts to provide students access to the same academic curriculum available to the general school population. One way to do that, the law says, is through "standards-based" individualized education programs, or IEPs, instead of educational plans that focus mostly on skills that do not connect to a cohesive academic goal.
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SHOWCASE
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Is the Common Core initiative in trouble?
The Washington Post
Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently met with Chamber of Commerce leaders and urged them to be more vocal and forceful in defending the Common Core State Standards. Why? Duncan made the appeal, which was reported by Education Week, because the initiative — a set of common standards adopted by 45 states and the District of Columbia designed to raise student achievement — has come under such withering attack in recent months that what once seemed like a major policy success for the Obama administration now looks troubled.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.


ADHD rises by almost 25 percent in 1 decade
WebMD
The number of children with ADHD is rising rapidly, according to a study of more than 840,000 California children. While the research findings echo those of nationwide studies, the new study is stronger than some other studies, says researcher Dr. Darios Getahun, a scientist at Kaiser Permanente Southern California, a large health plan. "We relied on the clinical diagnosis of ADHD [by doctors] and medication prescriptions rather than teacher or parent report," he says.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Dyslexia linked to brain communication breakdown (Scientific American)
Age of distraction: Why it's crucial for students to learn to focus (MindShift)
How to get students to love reading (Edudemic)
Inclusion on 'Nation's Report Card' goes up, but achievement gaps stay wide (Education Week)
Special educators strained by budget cuts (Disability Scoop)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Modern technology and new approaches help kids with dyslexia
Deseret News
When Nathan Eberting finished fourth grade last spring, he received thrilling news. He was reading at grade level, something that seemed impossible a couple of years earlier. At the beginning of second grade, Nathan's reading skills were stuck at kindergarten level. His halting efforts to read were especially painful because his twin brother, Matthew, was racing through book after book. "My boys had the same home environment, the same exposure to books, the same teachers," said Kristin Eberting, Nathan's mother. "One son could read, and the other was stumbling over 'a' and 'the.'"
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Is the Common Core unfair to special needs students?
EdTech Magazine
The Common Core State Standards Initiative has weathered its fair share of criticism on its way to adoption in 45 states, the District of Columbia and four U.S. territories. Critics have argued that the initiative, which aims to raise student achievement through a national set of academic standards, has been poorly implemented, unfairly labels teachers as ineffective in the event of poor standardized test scores, and forces students to think too narrowly about the lessons and problems they set out to solve, among other potential deficiencies.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Reading the brain: FDA approves first scan for diagnosing ADHD
TIME
It's the first test to diagnose the behavioral disorder using brain wave patterns, but it won't be the last. The idea of reading the brain's activity for clues to mental illness is gaining ground.

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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Study: MRI might allow earlier diagnosis of dyslexia
HealthDay News
Brain scans may help diagnose people with the common reading disorder dyslexia, a new study reveals. MRI scans in 40 kindergarten children revealed a link between poor pre-reading skills and the size of a structure that connects two language-processing areas in the brain, the researchers said.

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Kids yoga may help relieve ADHD
The Huffington Post
September ushers in autumn, back-to-school, and National Yoga Month. Designated by the Department of Health & Human Services, National Yoga Month features yoga's numerous health benefits. Now research reports that yoga may help relieve attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children. ADHD is one of the most common childhood behavioral disorders. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 8.4 percent of American children are diagnosed with ADHD.
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Reading the brain: FDA approves first scan for diagnosing ADHD
TIME
It's the first test to diagnose the behavioral disorder using brain wave patterns, but it won't be the last. The idea of reading the brain's activity for clues to mental illness is gaining ground. As Roxanne Khamsi reported in TIME recently, researchers are learning enough about the signature patterns of normal, and abnormal brain activity that they believe it may be possible to diagnose mental illnesses ranging from depression, schizophrenia, autism and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder by studying readouts of brain waves, much in the way they now rely on elecrocardiograms to diagnose heart problems.
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How does multitasking change the way kids learn?
MindShift
Living rooms, dens, kitchens, even bedrooms: Investigators followed students into the spaces where homework gets done. Pens poised over their "study observation forms," the observers watched intently as the students — in middle school, high school and college, 263 in all — opened their books and turned on their computers.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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