This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.



Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit

Home   About Us   Become a Member   Annual Conference    News    For Professionals   Contact Us





AVKO Foundation: Spelling & Reading Specialists


A non-profit organization devoted to helping teacher, parents, and researchers since 1974. MORE


Summit Camp, Travel, & Weekender Programs


Comprehensive summer camp, travel, and school year programs that offer fun, success, and a sense of belonging. summitcamp.com

 




 Top Stories

Schools learn to outsmart ADHD
District Administration Magazine
When students are diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, approaches that were once excluded from the classroom are now considered a valid option for helping them focus and learn. While the most common solution is medication, school district leaders have become increasingly aggressive in using other measures to improve the learning experience. Exercise balls, sensory kits and exercise breaks are among the approaches schools are taking to support students with ADHD as diagnosis of the disorder continues to increase in U.S. schools.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Learn how to Learn

Forman is a leader in using research-based teaching methods and assistive technology to empower students with learning disabilities and attention deficit disorders. We offer individualized strategies instruction, a strong athletics program, a range of creative arts, and 100% college placement -- plus a summer program. www.formanschool.org.
 


Updated LDA website is ready for visitors!
LDA
It's here ... the new LDA website is being introduced at LDA's 51st annual International Conference in Anaheim this week! Same great information with an updated look and some new content!

We hope you will find the new LDA website easy to navigate while searching for information important to helping your child, yourself, your students or clients.

But wait! There are some NEW options available on our site.

Ask The Expert: Take advantage of LDA's association with well-respected professionals who will answer your questions. Just submit your question and we will try to match it to a professional who can provide an answer.

State Affiliate Pages: LDA has over 100 state and local affiliates to help support you in your journey. Find your state contact easily and find out about the events happening in your area.

LDA Community Forum: This is a new feature added to our Members Only section. Here you can start a conversation on a topic of interest to you or join a conversation that is already underway.

Webinars, Videos, Success Stories, Legislative Updates and Resources all available to help Parents, Educators, Adults with LD and Professionals navigate through a sometimes frustrating and complicated maze. LDA is here to help make it a little easier and a lot less frustrating. So take a look around at ldaamerica.org. Then go to our Facebook page and let us know what you think!

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Toxic chemicals linked to autism, ADHD, dyslexia
UPI
Toxic chemicals may be behind the rising number of children with autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and dyslexia, U.S. researchers say. Co-authors Philippe Grandjean, adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and Philip Landrigan, dean of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, said the study outlines possible links between newly recognized neurotoxicants and negative health effects on children.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Student-Paced, Mastery-Based Math

Since 2004, Math-U-See has worked with intervention and special education teachers to reach struggling special needs math students. Math-U-See corresponds to math ability rather than traditional grade levels, so it can be used with students of any age. We provide tools and training for an explicit, structured, systematic, cumulative program using multi-sensory teaching techniques. MORE
 



 In the News


Report: Families have few resources to fight restraint, seclusion of children
Education Week
Families are often not told if their children are being secluded or restrained in schools, they often have problems getting information about the frequency or duration of such occurrences, and current regulations make it hard to fight such practices, according to a majority staff report from the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee. The report was released at the same time that the committee's chairman, Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, re-introduced a bill that would ban the use of seclusion in schools and severely restrict the use of restraints. He introduced a similar bill in 2012 and 2011.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


How video games help people with dyslexia read, focus: Improving reading comprehension with gaming skills
Medical Daily
New research suggests that video games may be potential tools for improving concentration and reading in people with dyslexia, offering even more solid scientific footing for the growing number of researchers who believe that the medium has a clear place in 2010s therapy. According to Dr. Vanessa Harrar, a researcher at Oxford University who led the new study, the findings build on the well-documented link between video gaming and sharpened attention skills. In this particular case, we're dealing with something called "cross-sensory shift of attention."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Phonics Games, Stories for Reading Fluency

“I wanted an Orton-Gillingham approach so I invested in Go Phonics because the work has been done for me. It’s all planned out in the Teacher’s Guide, with integrated tools I can use to reach these kids. When they come to me for reading, they’re excited because they know they can do it!” RT www.gophonics.com
 


Study: Adderall doesn't help kids get better grades
The Atlantic
More than 1 in 20 American children between the ages of 4 and 17 are medicated for attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder — up nearly 500 percent since 1990. Drugs like Adderall and Ritalin have a reputation as "good-grade pills" and "cognitive enhancers" that produce near-immediate improvements in the ability of children to pay attention in school. The thing is, studies tracing the impact of ADHD meds report no improvement in academic performance in the long term, as Nature reports in a new review of existing research, and kids taking the drugs are in some cases more likely to drop out of school.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Toxic chemicals linked to autism, ADHD, dyslexia
UPI
Toxic chemicals may be behind the rising number of children with autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and dyslexia, U.S. researchers say.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
In plain language: 5 big FAQ's about dyslexia
Psychology Today
Psychologists, cognitive scientists and neuroscientists are unraveling the mysteries of dyslexia. But if you are a parent, teacher or caregiver, it may be hard to read and comprehend the latest research.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Is school funding fair? States may be failing needy students
eSchool News
The stimulus package that provided funding for states as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act may have done more harm than good, suggests a new report. Instead of continuing to invest in crucial parts of education post-stimulus, many states have sacrificed fair school funding. During the beginning of the U.S. economy's recession in 2008, the federal government created a stimulus package to support public schools and prevent major layoffs and cuts in essential programs and services through the ARRA.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Colleges respond to growing ranks of learning disabled
The Hechinger Report
Endowed with a newfound freshman’s hunger for independence, Alix Generous thought she could conquer college without seeking help for the learning disabilities she had dealt with since she was 11. She was wrong. In her first year at the College of Charleston, Generous decided against using the school's assistance programs for students with dyslexia and other disorders, even though she had relied on such help throughout her childhood. "I was like, 'Now I'm 18 and can do what I want.' I definitely had that attitude. But a lot of it also was ignorance," said Generous, who grew up in Maryland.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Bullying affects children's long-term health, study shows
Medical News Today
In the first study of its kind to assess the compounding effects of bullying over 5 years, researchers have found that a child experiences more severe and lasting health implications the longer he or she is bullied, suggesting that early interventions could reverse the "downward health trajectory" that victims of bullying may experience. Results of the study were recently reported in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What musicians can tell us about dyslexia and the brain (Wired)
High cost of Common Core has states rethinking the national education standards (Fox News)
Receiving testing accommodations for learning disabilities (The Huffington Post)
Battling bullies: Safety experts offer advice on dealing with bullying, cyberbullying (Gaston Gazette)
America's school funding problems, state by state (The Washington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Promoting a culture of learning
Edutopia
Learning is a culture. It starts as a culture with the students as human beings needing to understand their environment. And it ends as a culture with students taking what we give them and using it in those physical and digital environments they call home. Even the practices that promote or undermine the learning process itself are first and foremost human and cultural artifacts. Literacy, curiosity, self-efficacy, ambition and other important agents of learning are born in the native environments of students' homes. Further, learning is ongoing, perishable and alive — just like culture.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Safer Internet Day stands up against bullies
The Christian Science Monitor
What do a high school student who's a bullying prevention activist, two criminology professors, and Safer Internet Day have in common? They're all sending the same message that safety and wellbeing online takes all of us. Aidan McDaniel, the student activist, says school safety happens from the ground up, starting with students. Social cruelty both online and offline isn't a student problem that administrators and teachers can fix from the top down, he told Public News Service. It's "everybody's problem" and the solution doesn't happen "without working with each other." In a presentation he gave last November at the International Bullying Prevention Association conference, Aidan spoke inspiringly about how he and other students train peers to mentor younger students in bullying prevention.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Spate of GOP bills take aim at Common Core
Education Week
Add yet another anti-Common Core bill from Congress to your tally. Sen. Lindsay Graham, R-S.C., a moderate who is facing a tough primary challenge, has introduced a resolution that makes it clear education is a state issue, and that the U.S. Secretary of Education should not coerce states into adopting common education standards. The resolution — introduced Feb. 5 — also states that the federal government shouldn't give states who adopt Common Core an edge in any future grant competitions.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 
THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
Contribute news

This edition of THE LD SOURCE was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Feb. 13, 2014
Feb. 6, 2014
Jan. 30, 2014
Jan. 23, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063