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Dyslexia and the English learner dilemma
Language Magazine
The American educational system has a difficult time understanding dyslexia and an even harder time identifying children with dyslexia in order to provide the correct intervention for students who are native English speakers. When a school has the added challenge of identifying struggling English language learners, the task becomes an even more complicated process, and often, these kids are completely missed. But that does not have to be the case. Children who are learning English are just as likely to have dyslexia as their native-English-speaking counterparts, and there is a way to identify dyslexia in these children. The difference is that dyslexia might appear in the native language quite as vividly as it will when they attempt to learn English.
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Three reasons students should opt out of standardized tests — and three reasons they shouldn't
The Hechinger Report
Now that spring is finally here, kids cooped up during this particularly brutal winter might be looking forward to enjoying some sunshine. Many will have to control the wiggles a little longer, though. It's standardized testing season, which means silent hallways, desks arranged in rows, and for many kids, a lot of anxiety until it's over. Now that the tests in many states are getting harder in order to align with the new Common Core standards and being used to grade teachers, not just students, they're also producing a lot of anxiety among parents and teachers, too. In response to the added pressure this year, a movement against standardized testing is gathering steam as some parents decide to let their children opt out of the tests.
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3 advances in special education instruction
eSchool News
Advances in educational technology make it possible for educators to tailor their instruction for students with special needs. These technologies, including online speech therapy and platforms to align goals in a student's Individual Education Plan with Common Core objectives, make it easier for teachers to spend more one-on-one time with students who have special needs or require additional classroom accommodations.
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Can schools be held accountable without standardized tests?
MindShift
The focus on scoring well on standardized tests has wedged educators into a difficult spot. Teachers are concerned that a poor showing on the tests will jeopardize school funding, or even their jobs, and often feel they have to suspend everything else in order to focus on test prep. Putting so much energy into one assessment — one that doesn't give teachers and students any granular, actionable information — takes resources, time, and energy away from other kinds of rich learning experiences.
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3 advances in special education instruction
eSchool News
Advances in educational technology make it possible for educators to tailor their instruction for students with special needs.

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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In plain language: 5 big FAQ's about dyslexia
Psychology Today
Psychologists, cognitive scientists and neuroscientists are unraveling the mysteries of dyslexia. But if you are a parent, teacher or caregiver, it may be hard to read and comprehend the latest research.

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 In the News


10 things wrong with what kids learn in school
The Washington Post (commentary)
The debate over the Common Core State Standards overlooks the broad problems inherent in the core curriculum that has been taught in schools for decades. Marion Brady explains. Brady has worked as a teacher, administrator, college professor, contributor to academic journals, textbook and professional book author, consultant to publishers and foundations, newspaper columnist.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Phonics Approach/Tools Ideal for Dyslexia/LLD

With Go Phonics confidence soars as struggling/dyslexic beginning readers get the vital prep to achieve success: 50 phonics games, work- sheets, and over 90 decodable stories. Orton-Gillingham based explicit, systematic, multisensory phonics lessons steer the course with the codes applied in reading, spelling, fluency, comprehension, language arts. Sample Lessons/Overview download: www.gophonics.com
 


Study: No link between school spending, student achievement
CBS DC
Decades of increased taxpayer spending per student in U.S. public schools has not improved student or school outcomes from that education, and a new study finds that throwing money at the system is simply not tied to academic improvements. The study from the CATO Institute shows that American student performance has remained poor, and has actually declined in mathematics and verbal skills, despite per-student spending tripling nationwide over the same 40-year period.
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Confusing math homework? Don't blame the Common Core
The Atlantic (commentary)
Jessica Lahey, a contributor for The Atlantic, writes: "'I hate the Common Core,' the mother of two complained when I told her I write about education. 'What, specifically, do you hate?' I asked. 'The math. It makes no sense! I can't help my kid with his homework and I don't understand the new methods at all.' What I told this mother, and what I wish I could explain to every parent frustrated with the nonsensical math homework coming home in our children's backpacks, is this: The confusing math methodology everyone is complaining about is not part of the Common Core State Standards."
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How a dyslexic neuroscientist's iPad app will boost your kid's math scores (TakePart)
Expert: Teachers are 'most important variable' for dyslexic kids (The New Canaan Advertiser)
Gifted + learning disabled = No desk for you, says new study (The Huffington Post)
Time management for kids (Psychology Today)
Teach For America to bolster special education training (Disability Scoop)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Iowa Senate Bill targeting dyslexia sent to Branstad
The Des Moines Register
A bill aimed at improving student literacy skills, and especially helping those with dyslexia, received final passage Wednesday from the Iowa Senate. Senate File 2319, which was sent to Gov. Terry Branstad, will place a definition of dyslexia in the Iowa Code for the first time, said Sen. Brian Schoenjahn, D-Arllington, who was the bill's floor manager. Dyslexia is a reading disability due to a defect in the brain's processing of graphic symbols.
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THE LD SOURCE

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