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AVKO Foundation: Spelling & Reading Specialists


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 Top Stories

How teaching students with special needs makes a better teacher for everyone
Chalkbeat
For some parents, the idea of having their child educated in the same classroom as a student with a disability can be off-putting. Parents may believe that meeting the needs of students with disabilities requires extra attention and support that detracts from their own child's learning. But educating children who don't have special needs in the same classroom as those who do, which happens more and more because of recent special education reforms, can be an opportunity for greater learning for all students — if teachers get creative.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Learn how to Learn

Forman is a leader in using research-based teaching methods and assistive technology to empower students with learning disabilities and attention deficit disorders. We offer individualized strategies instruction, a strong athletics program, a range of creative arts, and 100% college placement -- plus a summer program. www.formanschool.org.
 


Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal
LDA
Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal, LDMJ provides the most current research on the study of Learning Disabilities. The attached free article, Identifying Specific Reading Disability Subtypes for Effective Educational Remediation helps to further research regarding the importance of accurately classifying Reading Disabilities and most importantly, influencing informed intervention and decision making. Please consider a subscription to LDMJ and stay abreast of the latest research in the LD field.
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What are education tests for, anyway?
NPR
Pay attention to this piece. There's going to be a test at the end. Did that trigger scary memories of the 10th grade? Or are you just curious how you'll measure up? If the answer is "C: Either of the above," keep reading. Tests have existed throughout the history of education. Today they're being used more than ever before — but not necessarily as designed. Different types of tests are best for different purposes. Some help students learn better. Some are there to sort individuals. Others help us understand how a whole population is doing.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Student-Paced, Mastery-Based Math

Since 2004, Math-U-See has worked with intervention and special education teachers to reach struggling special needs math students. Math-U-See corresponds to math ability rather than traditional grade levels, so it can be used with students of any age. We provide tools and training for an explicit, structured, systematic, cumulative program using multi-sensory teaching techniques. MORE
 



 In the News


Bullies come from all socioeconomic sectors
Psych Central
A new systematic literature review on the association between socioeconomic status and involvement in childhood bullying has led researchers to recommend universal policies to combat bullying. Investigators say the behavior occurs among all socioeconomic sectors and that nearly one-third of all children are involved in bullying. This finding suggests bullying is a significant public health issue which can cause long-lasting health and social problems. The new review, published in the American Journal of Public Health, advises that policymakers should be wary of assuming that bullies are more likely to come from lower socioeconomic backgrounds.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Graduation rates fall short for students with disabilities (Disability Scoop)
Learning with disabilities: One effort to shake up the classroom (NPR)
How playful learning will build future leaders (The Christian Science Monitor)
Physical activity empowers kids to achieve personal bests (Psychology Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal
LDA
Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal, LDMJ provides the most current research on the study of Learning Disabilities.

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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In plain language: 5 big FAQ's about dyslexia
Psychology Today
Psychologists, cognitive scientists and neuroscientists are unraveling the mysteries of dyslexia. But if you are a parent, teacher or caregiver, it may be hard to read and comprehend the latest research.

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How our 1,000-year-old math curriculum cheats America's kids
eSchool News
Imagine you had to take an art class in which you were taught how to paint a fence or a wall, but you were never shown the paintings of the great masters, and you weren't even told that such paintings existed. Pretty soon you'd be asking, why study art? That's absurd, of course, but it's surprisingly close to the way we teach children mathematics. In elementary and middle school and even into high school, we hide math's great masterpieces from students' view.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CURRICULUM.


Beyond grades: Do games have a future as assessment tools?
MindShift
Most tests represent a snapshot of one moment in the trajectory of a student's academic journey, extrapolating what the student has learned overall. There are plenty of ways educators are trying to supplement those tests with more nuanced, formative assessments. With the advent of game-based learning, educators have been investigating how data collected from video game play could provide insight into the way students think as they explore new concepts.
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Kids' use of behavioral meds on the rise
Disability Scoop
A new survey from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds 7.5 percent of American children are taking medication to address behavioral or emotional difficulties and in most cases parents say the drugs are making a big difference. Boys and children who are white are most likely to be prescribed medication for behavioral or emotional issues. Children in low-income families and those insured by Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program are also taking the drugs in greater numbers. The findings are based on interviews with parents of kids ages 6 to 17 across the country who participated in the National Health Interview Survey in 2011 and 2012.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Approach/Tools Help Struggling Readers Succeed

With Go Phonics confidence soars as struggling/dyslexic beginning readers get the vital prep to achieve success: 50 phonics games, work- sheets, and over 90 decodable stories. Orton-Gillingham based explicit, systematic, multisensory phonics lessons steer the course as the codes are applied in reading, spelling, fluency, comprehension, and language arts. Sample Lessons/Overview download: gophonics.com
 


Is cursive handwriting slowly dying out in America?
PBS Newshour
Many elementary schools across the United States have dropped cursive instruction altogether as increased testing, the implementation of Common Core State Standards and computers in the classroom take more time and resources. Forty-five states and the District of Columbia use the Common Core's English Language Arts standards. But a few states (California, Idaho, Kansas, Massachusetts, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee among them) have recently moved to make cursive mandatory.
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Why parents shouldn't help kids with their homework
Today
It may feel tempting — proper even — to help your child with homework, but parents who get involved this way don't improve their kids' test scores or grades, and can hurt their academic achievement, two researchers have found. "We need to do away with the assumption that anything parents do will help. That assumes that parents have all the answers, and parents do not have all the answers," Angel L. Harris, one of the scholars, told TODAY Moms.
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Many bullied teens carry weapons to school, study finds
HealthDay News
Large numbers of U.S. high school students who are bullied take weapons to school, a new study finds. "Victims of bullying who have been threatened, engaged in a fight, injured or had property stolen or damaged are much more likely to carry a gun or knife to school," said study senior investigator Dr. Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York. The researchers analyzed data from more than 15,000 U.S. high school students who took part in a 2011 survey. They found that teens who suffered many types of bullying are up to 31 times more likely to bring weapons such as guns and knives to school than those who have not been bullied.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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