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 Top Stories

Schools look to 'grow their own' special educators
Disability Scoop
Over the past four years, Samantha Ovadal has been bitten, hit, kicked and scratched while working as an education assistant at a Maplewood, Minn. school that serves students with severe emotional and behavioral disorders. Yet Ovadal loves her job, and dreams of becoming a special education teacher. The only things standing in her way are the time and money it would take to pursue her master's degree. Most likely, she would have to quit her job, creating another difficult-to-fill classroom vacancy. But a first-of-its-kind University of Minnesota master's degree program promises to groom education assistants such as Ovadal into special education teachers by training them on the job in the classrooms where they already work.
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States spending less money on K-12 education get better results
Michigan Capital Confidential
Many who advocate for perpetual increases in education spending believe that greater K-12 funding leads to better educational results. But looking at states across the nation shows this is not the case. In fact, most states that spend less on K-12 education than Michigan perform better — many significantly better. And analyzing gains in the National Assessment of Educational Progress show that lower-spending states are making the largest educational gains.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Student-Paced, Mastery-Based Math

Since 2004, Math-U-See has worked with intervention and special education teachers to reach struggling special needs math students. Math-U-See corresponds to math ability rather than traditional grade levels, so it can be used with students of any age. We provide tools and training for an explicit, structured, systematic, cumulative program using multi-sensory teaching techniques. MORE
 


Children with ADHD experience more adversities than those without ADHD
Medical News Today
When children struggle with focusing on tasks, staying organized, controlling their behavior and sitting still, they may be evaluated for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Clinicians, however, shouldn't stop there, according to a study presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Researchers found that many children with ADHD also face challenges such as poverty, divorce, neighborhood violence and substance abuse among family members.
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 In the News


5 ways dyslexia can affect a child's social life
The National Center for Learning Disabilities
Dyslexia makes reading and other language-based tasks difficult, but it can also affect your child's social skills. Here are five common social challenges your child with dyslexia may face — and ways you can help.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.


High stakes for states on NCLB waiver compliance
Education Week
No Child Left Behind Act waivers — initially billed by the Obama administration as a collaborative effort to help states get beyond the outdated NCLB law — have moved deep into the compliance phase, leaving states and the U.S. Department of Education to negotiate over the finer points of plans, rather than discussing big-picture policy ideas. The details, however, can prove make-or-break for states, which risk losing their flexibility altogether if they can't come to an accord with the administration.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
How cursive can help students with dyslexia connect the dots
PBS NewsHour
Alec Falconer knew for years that he had a problem with words and letters. The young man who is now in ninth grade struggled in school for nearly a decade before his learning difficulty was diagnosed as dyslexia.

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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In plain language: 5 big FAQ's about dyslexia
Psychology Today
Psychologists, cognitive scientists and neuroscientists are unraveling the mysteries of dyslexia. But if you are a parent, teacher or caregiver, it may be hard to read and comprehend the latest research.

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PBL meets the Next Generation Science Standards
Edutopia
Although the Next Generation Science Standards have not yet been fully implemented, more and more states are signing up as early adopters. The NGSS call for a conceptual shift in teaching and learning. Along with traditional subject matter, science and engineering are now integrated into the standards, and students will learn about the principles of engineering and engage in the engineering design processes.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Approach/Tools Help Struggling Readers Succeed

With Go Phonics confidence soars as struggling/dyslexic beginning readers get the vital prep to achieve success: 50 phonics games, work- sheets, and over 90 decodable stories. Orton-Gillingham based explicit, systematic, multisensory phonics lessons steer the course as the codes are applied in reading, spelling, fluency, comprehension, and language arts. Sample Lessons/Overview download: gophonics.com
 


Why is the math gender gap so much worse in the US than in other countries?
The Huffington Post (commentary)
Could it be the boy crisis? A new international study released last week shows that during the past 100 years, the first in which girls have been educated en masse, girls have out-performed boys academically. I'm not going to write here about what that may mean in terms of what grades are rewarding or about how that fact hasn't led to the dismantling of institutional male dominance. This is just about math and what our persistent gender gap means.
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How cursive can help students with dyslexia connect the dots
PBS NewsHour
Alec Falconer knew for years that he had a problem with words and letters. The young man who is now in ninth grade struggled in school for nearly a decade before his learning difficulty was diagnosed as dyslexia. Dyslexia is a language processing disorder that can hinder reading, writing, spelling and sometimes even speaking. "When I first found out I was dyslexic I was a little stunned," said Falconer. "During elementary school and middle school, I've never had to write in cursive. My teachers let me just write in print," Falconer said. But for those with dyslexia, cursive handwriting can be an integral part of becoming a more successful student.
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New research into bullying and its effect on children's mental health
Medical News Today
Increasing evidence shows that stigma — whether due to a child's weight, sexual orientation, race, income or other attribute — is at the root of bullying, and that it can cause considerable harm to a child's mental health. Experts in pediatric mental health, bullying and ostracism gathered for a symposium titled "Stigma, Ostracism and Bullying: Dangers, Prevention and Interventions" at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia. Researchers will present evidence of stigma associated with various attributes and the harm it poses to children through bullying, ostracism, and discrimination.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal (LDA)
What are education tests for, anyway? (NPR)
How teaching students with special needs makes a better teacher for everyone (Chalkbeat)
How our 1,000-year-old math curriculum cheats America's kids (eSchool News)
Is cursive handwriting slowly dying out in America? (PBS Newshour)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Do states need a Common Core check-up?
eSchool News
Resources and tools for Common Core abound, but it's time to gauge how implementation is really going, according to some stakeholders. Part of that motivation, according to the Chief Council of State School Officers, is to obtain an accurate picture of states' efforts amid the vigorous support for, and backlash against, the Common Core State Standards. CCSSO, which has led the creation of the Common Core along with the National Governors Association, partnered with four state education leaders to examine those states' progress.
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A conversation about tests that educators want to have, but can't
The New York Times
Let's talk about testing. "I want to," said Bob Bender, principal of Public School 11 in Chelsea. "I want my voice to be heard about how outraged I was about the exam." So by all means, speak up. He sighed. "I can't go against the state embargo," Bender said. By state order, teachers and principals may not disclose any contents of the three days of standardized English tests that were given at the beginning of April.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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