This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.



  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit May. 16, 2013

Home   About Us   Become a Member   Annual Conference    News    For Professionals   Contact Us





Summit Camp & Travel Programs

Comprehensive summer camp, travel, and school year programs that offer fun, success, and a sense of belonging. summitcamp.com




 




 Top Stories

Study: Brain anatomy in dyslexics varies by gender
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
The brains of males and females with dyslexia differ significantly, which suggests the learning disability needs to be treated separately in each gender, a new study has found. Researchers used MRIs to scan the brains of 118 men, women, boys and girls with and without dyslexia, which impairs a person's ability to read. Compared to people without dyslexia, males with dyslexia had less gray matter in areas of the brain that process language, while females with dyslexia had less gray matter in areas involved in sensory and motor processing.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




How to train students' brains for the Common Core
eSchool News
The Common Core State Standards ask students to perform with higher levels of cognition and application, and brain training and specific teaching methods can help students succeed with these new standards, experts say. According to Margaret Glick, a neuroscience expert and educational consultant at the International Center for Leadership in Education, the Common Core State Standards and the accompanying assessments will cognitively require more than past standards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Obama administration looks to improve transition outcomes
Disability Scoop
In an effort to identify better strategies to help young people with disabilities transition from school to work, a handful of federal agencies are seeking public input. Recently, the U.S. Departments of Labor, Education and Health and Human Services as well as the Social Security Administration are kicking off a two-week so-called online dialogue. The agencies are asking policymakers, educators, service providers, families and youth with disabilities themselves to share their thoughts through a Web interface on how to improve transition outcomes.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SHOWCASE
  Selective

Since 1926, Selective has been providing businesses like yours with the insurance solutions you need We know, Response is everything®,and we'll prove it to you when you work with us. Selective offers a wide range of insurance solutions for you.
Click here for more..
 



 In the News


ULD and the Common Core
MiddleWeb
High stakes testing season is upon us. One purpose of testing is to assess what students know and to guide them to be ready for their future. Students with disabilities are provided support through individualized testing accommodations that ensure that their disability does not interfere with their ability to access the information and to express what they know. The idea is to make the general education curriculum and assessment procedures accessible to all students.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Rifts deepen over direction of education policy in US
Education Week
In statehouses and cities across the country, battles are raging over the direction of education policy — from the standards that will shape what students learn to how test results will be used to judge a teacher's performance. Students and teachers, in passive resistance, are refusing to take and give standardized tests. Protesters have marched to the White House over what they see as the privatization of the nation's schools. Professional and citizen lobbyists are packing hearings in state capitols to argue that the federal government is trying to dictate curricula through the use of common standards.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Go Phonics includes Decodable Stories & Word Decoding Games Ideal for Dyslexia/LLD

Go Phonics is explicit, multisensory phonics instruction for teaching the foundational skills ALL students need. Integrated tools include guided lesson plans, 50 phonics games and 5 workbooks in preparation for reading over 90 stories that students can really read (93% decodable). The Go Phonics sequence is Orton-Gillingham compatible.

Go Phonics Reading Program
Download Sample Lessons or Visit: www.gophonics.com
Where Students
with Learning Differences Excel


Summit View, a WASC-accredited school and college preparatory program, offers comprehensive elementary, middle, and secondary school programs for students with learning differences. An innovative and integrated curriculum utilizing the latest technology, small class sizes, and high teacher to student ratio enables students to experience academic success.
For information, visit www.summitview.org.
Students Can Learn Grammar Easily!


Easy Grammar

Students learn to simplify by deleting prepositional phrases.

Concepts are introduced at a basic level in a building-block approach.

“I used it and saw immediate results and a positive increase in scores. It really works!”J.W.

Dr. Phillips emphasizes mastery learning.
www.easygrammar.com


Report: Why it is hard to monitor bullying at schools
The Washington Post
A new report that reviewed years of research says that it is hard to accurately monitor levels of bullying in schools because there is still no consensus on exactly what it is and that educators and scholars "should not limit themselves to the traditional definition" as they seek ways to combat it. The report, called "Prevention of Bullying in Schools, Colleges and Universities" and just released by the American Educational Research Association at its 2013 meeting in San Francisco, is the work of a blue-ribbon task force that was charged with finding short- and long-term recommendations for institutions to address bullying of young people.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


8 ways to have self-esteem boosting conversations about learning disabilities
NCLD
Diana Sticker, a contributor for the National Center for Learning Disabilities, writes: "We loved our drive to school each morning. It gave us time to chat about the upcoming day's events. But in 4th grade our morning routine changed. My daughter became anxious and teary eyed on the way to school. She frequently had stomachaches. Some days she complained about being overwhelmed in writing class. Many times she refused to go to school. This was unusual. She was a bright, hardworking, creative and enthusiastic student. But unknown to me and her teachers, she was struggling to keep up. Over time I started to recognize the root of the problem: dyslexia."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword LEARNING DISABILITIES.


Learning takes time: Growing movement seeks to expand length of school day
Deseret News
In most U.S. schools, the school day and year are the same length today as 100 years ago — 6 ½ hours, 180 days. Expectations for what schools must crowd into that time have risen sharply, though. Concerns that American workers need better preparation to keep up with global competition have increased school hours spent on math and English language arts, especially since the advent of the federal No Child Left Behind Act in 2002.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
ADD ADHD LD Asperger's

Charis Hills is designed for campers with learning differences to build confidence and find success. Emphasis on social skills. Choose from over 20 recreational activities. MORE
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the LDA eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact James DeBois at 469-420-2618.
MORE


Student achievement goals at issue in senate NCLB renewal effort
Education Week
Until recently, U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, the chairman of the Senate education committee, and Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander, the panel's top Republican, were in talks to see if there was any chance of getting a bipartisan bill to reauthorize the long-stalled No Child Left Behind Act together in this Congress. But now it's looking like the two lawmakers were unable to resolve fundamental disagreements, making an already very tough reauthorization process that much harder.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Testing touchscreen tables in classrooms
CNN
Forget tiny iPads — the classrooms of the future might turn entire tables into interactive touchscreens. Given that many children can sit rapturously before a glowing touchscreen for hours, such gadgets seem like a natural for the classroom. But as with any new teaching technology, it's important to make sure it actually helps students learn and teachers teach before getting caught up in its "cool" factor.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Even moderate blood lead levels affect children's reading skills
ParentHerald
Exposure to certain heavy metals during the early stages of growth may interfere with a child's ability to perform at school later. Explaining this point, researchers found that children with high levels of lead in their blood have reduced reading readiness at kindergarten. To analyze the link, Pat McLaine and team looked at 3,406 kindergarten children in Providence, R.I.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How does multitasking change the way kids learn? (MindShift)
Majority of doctors do not follow treatment guidelines for ADHD (TIME)
Poll: Many teachers say they need training in Common Core standards (The Washington Post)
Meeting the challenges of student writing in the digital age (ED.gov Blog)
Your child's brain on math: Don't bother? (Reuters)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Plan aims to determine students' socioeconomic status
USA Today
Looking for a clearer picture of how poor, middle-class and wealthy students perform in U.S. schools, the Obama administration wants to redefine how it calculates children's socioeconomic status. In a new white paper, just released, the U.S. Department of Education proposes classifying students by more than just their parents' income or education levels. It explains the federal government should be able to tie test scores to a host of indicators, including: whether parents own or rent their home, how many times a family has moved in the past year and whether anyone in their household gets medical assistance.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Diversity at issue as states weigh teacher entry
Education Week
Slowly but surely, a growing number of states are eyeing policies to select academically stronger individuals for their teaching programs as one avenue to improve the quality of new teachers. Underneath the attention such plans are attracting, though, run deep-seated fears about their potential consequences — particularly whether they will result in a K-12 workforce with fewer black and Latino teachers. On nearly all the measures states are considering, from GPAs to licensure-test scores, minority candidates tend to have weaker scores than their white counterparts.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Report: Why it is hard to monitor bullying at schools
The Washington Post
A new report that reviewed years of research says that it is hard to accurately monitor levels of bullying in schools because there is still no consensus on exactly what it is and that educators and scholars "should not limit themselves to the traditional definition" as they seek ways to combat it.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Is the Common Core initiative in trouble?
The Washington Post
Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently met with Chamber of Commerce leaders and urged them to be more vocal and forceful in defending the Common Core State Standards. Why?

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
A teaching technique for teachers of students with LD
NCLD
Special education teacher Meg Randall discusses a teaching technique she uses to better serve her students, including those with learning disabilities, in the classroom.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Schools adapt to federal guidelines
Wisconsin Rapids Tribune
New federal guidelines could result in noticeable changes to the school day for local students with learning disabilities. Wisconsin Rapids School Board members will consider a variety of changes during their monthly meeting, including adding periods during the school day at the junior high and high schools and purchasing intervention tools to help the district comply with new regulations.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Nearly 1 in 3 with autism socially isolated
Disability Scoop
Young adults with autism are often left out socially, with new research finding they are less likely to receive phone calls and invites from friends than even those with other types of developmental disabilities. In a study looking at the experiences of young people who received special education services, researchers found that those on the spectrum are facing a particularly rocky transition to adulthood socially.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Common standards set for federal education research
Education Week
As part of an effort to improve the quality of educational research and make it less balkanized, the National Science Foundation and the Institute of Education Sciences have introduced a common set of evidence standards for federally funded work. The criteria, rolled out at the American Educational Research Association's annual meeting, will guide all new research at the IES, the U.S. Department of Education's main research agency, and all NSF research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 
THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Hailey Sasser, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
Contribute news

This edition of THE LD SOURCE was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
May 9, 2013
May 2, 2013
April 25, 2013
April 18, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063