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Feds warn charters on special education
Disability Scoop
Charter schools must provide special education services and ensure that students with disabilities are not discriminated against just like traditional public schools, federal education officials say. In a "Dear Colleague" letter, the U.S. Department of Education said that charters have the same obligations as regular public schools to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act in addition to other federal civil rights laws. Such responsibilities are the same whether or not charters receive federal funding, the Education Department guidance indicates.
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Reading experience may change the brains of dyslexic students
The New York Times
Among the many challenges faced by children with dyslexia (and by their parents and teachers) is the nagging fear that their difficulties with reading are entirely hard-wired: predetermined by their genes and impossible to change. Recent research offers a balm for that fear. It suggests that experience plays a big role in dyslexia, both in exacerbating reading problems and, potentially, in easing them. Dyslexia is the most common learning disability in the United States, affecting more than 10 percent of the population. Its cause has remained a mystery, however, and over the years scientists have advanced many theories about the biological mechanism leading to dyslexic people's struggles with reading.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.


Common Core passes field test — with a few snags
District Administration Magazine
Field testing for the Common Core assessments wrapped up in June, with districts in 36 states reporting mostly successful first runs despite some challenges around technology, test questions and scheduling. Some four million students in the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium and the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers participated in the trial run. Most field tests last 2.5 to 4.5 hours, depending on subject and grade level. The actual tests will take between 7.5 and 10 hours, spread out over two weeks.
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 In the News


Report: US children read, but not well or often
Reuters
Although American children still spend part of their days reading, they are spending less time doing it for pleasure than decades ago, with significant gaps in proficiency, according to a report. The San Francisco-based nonprofit Common Sense Media, which focuses on the effects of media and technology on children, published the report, which brings together information from several national studies and databases.
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Study: You really can 'work smarter, not harder'
The Atlantic
Learning is more effective if a lesson or experience is deliberately coupled with time spent thinking about what was just presented, a new study shows.

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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In plain language: 5 big FAQ's about dyslexia
Psychology Today
Psychologists, cognitive scientists and neuroscientists are unraveling the mysteries of dyslexia. But if you are a parent, teacher or caregiver, it may be hard to read and comprehend the latest research.

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Louisiana special education bill would segregate students with disabilities, advocates say
The Huffington Post
Should schools expect students with a disability to know the same things as other kids their age to advance and graduate? This decades-old question, which strikes at the heart of the civil rights movement for students who have disabilities, has provoked a debate in Louisiana that's dividing advocates. Legislation unanimously approved by the Louisiana House now being considered by the Senate potentially would lower expectations for students with disabilities by allowing teachers and administrators to promote or graduate them without regard for state standards, according to several national advocacy groups and Louisiana's schools chief.
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Study: You really can 'work smarter, not harder'
The Atlantic
Learning is more effective if a lesson or experience is deliberately coupled with time spent thinking about what was just presented, a new study shows. A team of researchers from HEC Paris, Harvard Business School, and the University of North Carolina conducted what they call the first empirical test of the effect of reflection on learning. By "reflection," they mean taking time after a lesson to synthesize, abstract or articulate the important points.
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Cure for school bullying? Culture of kindness
Burlington Free Press
A student who feels belittled and ostracized by school peers might struggle to perform academically and come to dread school. In extreme cases, bullying can cause such anguish that students suffer depression or harm themselves or others. Tragic outcomes related to bullying are too familiar, especially in the Internet age when online taunts or sexually explicit bullying go viral.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    5 ways dyslexia can affect a child's social life (The National Center for Learning Disabilities)
Schools look to 'grow their own' special educators (Disability Scoop)
Children with ADHD experience more adversities than those without ADHD (Medical News Today)
States spending less money on K-12 education get better results (Michigan Capital Confidential)
How cursive can help students with dyslexia connect the dots (PBS NewsHour)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Study finds hazardous flame retardants in preschools and day care centers
Medical News Today
A new study of preschools and day care centers finds that flame retardants are prevalent indoors, potentially exposing young children to chemicals known to be hazardous. The study, to appear online Thursday, May 15, in the journal Chemosphere, was led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and funded by the California Air Resources Board. Although many infants and young children spend up to 50 hours per week in day care, the study authors noted that this paper represents the first systematic review of flame retardants in early child care settings.
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Teaching that's tailored to learners
The Christian Science Monitor
Sometimes a new idea seems so obvious that we slap our foreheads and wonder what we were thinking all along. In the early 19th century, the German educator Friedrich Froebel came up with the idea that young children should be encouraged in what they naturally want to do: play. Teachers could help them along through games and other forms of loosely structured education, bearing in mind that each child learns at a different pace. The charming word he gave to his concept is now used worldwide: kindergarten.
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States tightening loopholes in school vaccine laws
Education Week
As outbreaks of preventable diseases have spread around the country in recent years, some states have been re-evaluating how and why they allow parents to opt their children out of vaccines required for school attendance. Requiring vaccines before school admission has been a key component of a decades-long campaign that had nearly rid the United States of some of its most severe illnesses, from the measles to whooping cough, public-health experts say.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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