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Diplomas elusive for many students with learning disabilities
Education Week
A state-by-state analysis of the most recent data on graduation rates for students with learning disabilities shows that while more of those students have been leaving high school with a standard diploma, many states are struggling to reach the national graduation rate average of 68 percent for students in that disability category. Students with learning disabilities — dyslexia, dyscalculia, or auditory or visual processing disorders, for example — make up about 41 percent of the students who are covered under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
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Common Core promises new tests. Will they be better than the old ones?
The Christian Science Monitor
Tests that can assess students' mastery of skills and knowledge are as important as the Common Core standards themselves, say many educators and education reformers. Will the tests that accompany Common Core be any better than those states are using now? The hope is they will be, but it will be about two years before the answer is clear.
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Feds to emphasize student performance in special education
Disability Scoop
Federal education officials are looking to reshape the way they evaluate each state's compliance with special education law to put a heavier focus on student performance. The U.S. Department of Education reviews how well states perform under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act annually, determining whether the state "meets requirements," "needs assistance," "needs intervention" or "needs substantial intervention." The evaluations take into account a variety of factors including dropout and graduation rates, whether or not students with disabilities are disproportionately suspended or representative of certain racial groups and post-high school outcomes.
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 In the News


The surprising ways BYOD, flipped classrooms and 1-to-1 are being used in the special education classroom
THE Journal
The latest compilation from the U.S. Department of Education (from 2010-2011) reports that about 13 percent of public school enrollment consists of students served by special education programs. That count has pretty much stayed the same for the last 13 years. What's different now is that, as technology pervades all aspects of the classroom, special education teachers need to make a decision about whether they're going to stay on track with specialized assistive technologies or adopt some of the mainstream ones that general education students are using.
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How to recognize dyslexia early
Moorpark Acorn
One in 5 people in the U.S. has some sort of learning disability like dyslexia, yet experts say that for many children, the problem remains undiagnosed longer than it should. Recognizing the early signals of such learning differences can be important for a child's success in school and life. Pediatric neuropsychologist Dr. Nichole Dawson has a son with dyslexia, and has teamed up with Learning Ally, a national nonprofit, to inform the public about dyslexia’s early warning signs and to advise parents on what to look for.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.


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Join the conversation to improve transition from school to work for youth with disabilities
ED.gov Blog
Today's young people must graduate from high school with the skills necessary to succeed in the 21st century global economy. And that certainly includes youth with disabilities. To that end, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services and the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy are working closely together to create opportunities for youth with disabilities to graduate college and career ready.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study: Brain anatomy in dyslexics varies by gender (HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report)
8 ways to have self-esteem boosting conversations about learning disabilities (NCLD)
How to train students' brains for the Common Core (eSchool News)
ULD and the Common Core (MiddleWeb)
Obama administration looks to improve transition outcomes (Disability Scoop)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Common Core supporters firing back
Education Week
Supporters of the Common Core State Standards are moving to confront increasingly high-profile opposition to the standards at the state and national levels by rallying the private sector and initiating coordinated public relations and advertising campaigns as schools continue implementation. In states such as Michigan and Tennessee, where Common Core opponents feel momentum is with them, state education officials, the business community and allied advocacy groups are ramping up efforts to define and buttress support for the standards — and to counter what they say is misinformation.
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Up to 1 in 5 children suffer from mental disorder: CDC
Reuters
Up to 20 percent of children in the United States suffer from a mental disorder, and the number of kids diagnosed with one has been rising for more than a decade, according to a report released by the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. In the agency's first-ever study of mental disorders among children aged 3 to 17, researchers found childhood mental illnesses affect up to 1 in 5 kids and cost $247 billion per year in medical bills, special education and juvenile justice.
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Teaching dyslexic children: spotting the signs and supporting your students
The Guardian
With many teachers not trained to spot dyslexia, Sally Bouwman shares her advice for detecting the disorder. "The one thing my postgraduate teacher training course had simply not prepared me for was that more than a third of my first class of seven and eight year-olds might not be reading and writing with any degree of confidence. Granted, it was a school in special measures, and many of the pupils did not have the clear structure, support or guidance at school, or, in some cases, at home, that would help progress their literacy skills."
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Technology gives students with disabilities access to college courses
ED.gov Blog
Michael Yudin, a contributor for ED.gov Blog, writes: "Last week, I met with a group of high school students with learning disabilities who attend a dual-enrollment high school/college program at Mission Middle College in Santa Clara, California. The program emphasizes the use of technology, including the Bookshare accessible library, to help students earn college credit while still in high school. The Mission Middle College educational program is a collaboration of Santa Clara Unified School District and Mission Community College. The program takes on a student-centered learning environment where seniors can complete required high school courses while accumulating college credits."
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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Diplomas elusive for many students with learning disabilities
Education Week
A state-by-state analysis of the most recent data on graduation rates for students with learning disabilities shows that while more of those students have been leaving high school with a standard diploma, many states are struggling to reach the national graduation rate average of 68 percent for students in that disability category.

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Kids' learning disabilities may have multiple causes
HealthDay News
Up to 10 percent of children — two or three kids in every classroom — are thought to have learning disabilities, and a new review finds these disabilities have complex causes and suggests possible approaches.

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How does multitasking change the way kids learn?
MindShift
Living rooms, dens, kitchens, even bedrooms: Investigators followed students into the spaces where homework gets done. Pens poised over their "study observation forms," the observers watched intently as the students — in middle school, high school and college, 263 in all — opened their books and turned on their computers.

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Education reform's next big thing: Common Core standards ramp up
The Christian Science Monitor
In an Algebra I class at Mountain View High School, a freshman girl is struggling with a new assignment: The students are working in small groups to try to find the number of different-shaped tiles needed to cover a certain size tabletop — and then how to find a pattern and extrapolate on that answer for other sizes. "Is this supposed to be hard or easy?" she asks her teacher in frustration. "It's supposed to make you think," replies Kristina Smith, the teacher, as she patiently circles through the room, responding to each student's questions not with an answer but with additional questions that encourage them to push themselves to the next step.
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In Newtown's wake: How grief is handled at school
Edutopia (commentary)
Christine Park, the president of New York Life Foundation, writes: "In the months since the horrific Newtown school shooting, a media spotlight has glared on the nearly 450 surviving students at Sandy Hook Elementary who are grieving for their friends, teachers, classmates, school staff and, in some cases, their siblings. Their stories serve as an enduring reminder of the overpowering grief and loss left in the Newtown tragedy's wake."
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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