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 Top Stories

Sweeping new bill seeks to help students with disabilities, but it may not go far enough
The Huffington Post
The bipartisan overhaul of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act trumpeted in Washington, D.C., includes provisions aimed to help students with disabilities find well-paying work, but some say the deal doesn't go far enough. Recently, Sens. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, Patty Murray, D-Wash., and Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., along with Reps. John Kline, R-Minn., Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., and George Miller, D-Calif., announced a sweeping bipartisan, bicameral deal that was long in the making. The bill aims to modernize the 1998 law, which oversees $3 billion in job training programs, by eliminating 15 programs and creating universal performance metrics. Many expect it to advance.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Student-Paced, Mastery-Based Math

Since 2004, Math-U-See has worked with intervention and special education teachers to reach struggling special needs math students. Math-U-See corresponds to math ability rather than traditional grade levels, so it can be used with students of any age. We provide tools and training for an explicit, structured, systematic, cumulative program using multi-sensory teaching techniques. MORE
 


Tips for parents of children with LD/ADHD
LDA
Need some ideas to make learning easier for your child with LD/ADHD? Here are some helpful tips that LDA parents have learned from one another over the years. It includes tips for organizational problems, auditory problems, visual and motor problems, language-expressive problems and language-receptive problems as well as tips for parenting in general.
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National landscape fragments as states plan Common Core testing
Education Week
Only a few years ago, the ambitious initiative to use shared assessments to gauge learning based on the new Common Core standards had enlisted 45 states and the District of Columbia. Today, the testing landscape looks much more fragmented, with only 27 of them still planning to use those tests in 2014-2015, and the rest opting for other assessments or undecided, an Education Week analysis shows.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword COMMON CORE.



 In the News


Law school applicants with disabilities win suit over admissions tests
San Francisco Chronicle
In a nationwide settlement of a San Francisco lawsuit, the administrator of the admissions test for prospective law students agreed to stop notifying schools that a test taker has disabilities and to ease its restrictions for accommodating disabled students. The settlement also includes $6.73 million for 6,300 disabled students who have applied for extra time for the exam and other accommodations over the past five years. Another $2 million in compensation will go to individual students and the state and federal governments, which took part in the suit.
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For frustrated gifted kids, a world of online opportunities
MindShift
When parents find they have a two-year-old who can read, or a five-year-old who wakes up talking about square roots, the task of ensuring that these exceptionally bright children get the educational nourishment they need is unchartered territory. The path can be frustrating for the kids, and worry-inducing for the parents. But the ongoing boom in online learning opportunities has been a great benefit for many gifted youth because the offerings can cater to a student's ability rather than age.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
How can teachers inspire learning? By empowering students
eSchool News
How can today's teachers inspire their students? Where does true engagement in learning come from — and how can technology play a role?

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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In plain language: 5 big FAQ's about dyslexia
Psychology Today
Psychologists, cognitive scientists and neuroscientists are unraveling the mysteries of dyslexia. But if you are a parent, teacher or caregiver, it may be hard to read and comprehend the latest research.

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An alternative approach to preventing bullying
District Administration Magazine
In a 2011 National Crime Victimization Survey, close to 1.2 million students reported that someone was hurtful to them at school once a week or more. This rate has not significantly declined since 2005. Of this number, close to 540,000 students say this happens "almost daily." Furthermore, over 700,000 students reported they were "fearful of attack or harm" at school "sometimes" or "most of the time." It's clear: What schools are doing to stop bullying isn't working. And the risks of liability or an agency enforcement action are increasing.
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With new standards, can schools find room for creative writing?
The Hechinger Report
For the past few years, the new nationwide Common Core state standards have been slowly rolling out in Florida's schools. Next year, all schools will fully implement the standards, which lay out what students are expected to learn in reading and math in kindergarten through twelfth grade. It's led to big changes for teachers, many of whom are throwing out lesson plans and cherished writing assignments and learning new ways to teach the basics, like multiplication. The Hechinger Report's Jackie Mader visited one rural panhandle elementary school to see how the standards are changing writing instruction.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Reading experience may change the brains of dyslexic students (The New York Times)
Common Core passes field test — with a few snags (District Administration Magazine)
Feds warn charters on special education (Disability Scoop)
Report: US children read, but not well or often (Reuters)
Study: You really can 'work smarter, not harder' (The Atlantic)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


How can teachers inspire learning? By empowering students
eSchool News
How can today's teachers inspire their students? Where does true engagement in learning come from — and how can technology play a role? These questions were the focus of a unique professional development event held in Dallas, during which attendees heard from an all-star lineup of educators.
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Low-income children benefit from program to reduce behavior problems, boost math, reading
Medical News Today
A program aimed at reducing behavior problems in order to boost academic achievement has improved performance in math and reading among low-income kindergartners and first graders, according to a study by researchers at New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of Educational Psychology, point to the value of well-designed interventions to improve education, the study's authors say.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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