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 Top Stories

State chiefs: Common Core requires flexibility, not a pause
Education Week
The Council of Chief State School Officers is rejecting calls for a moratorium on any high stakes tied to the Common Core State Standards, and is instead suggesting that states have almost all of the power they need to smooth the way for what could be a rocky transition. What the chiefs do want, however, is some flexibility from the U.S. Department of Education and from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan — from No Child Left Behind itself or the waivers already granted — during these next couple of tricky years as the Common Core is fully implemented and common tests come on line. In fact, about three-dozen chiefs or their representatives met with three high-level federal department officials last week in Chicago to talk about these issues.
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State tells Seattle schools to fix problems in special education
The Seattle Times
Seattle Public Schools has 18 months to fix persistent problems in its special-education programs, or risk losing millions of dollars in federal special-education funding or control over how it can spend that money. The state Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction set the deadline after years of warnings. The district, state officials say, is failing to keep an accurate count of its special-education students, doesn't ensure that all students who qualify for special-education services receive them, and often doesn't follow the academic plans all such students must have. That's just a sampling.
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New campaign aims to curb restraint and seclusion
Disabilities Scoop
Disability advocates are looking to jump-start their efforts to end abusive restraint and seclusion practices in the nation's schools with a campaign kicking off this week. Organizers of the new effort known as "Stop Hurting Kids" say they hope to raise public awareness of the dangerous consequences often resulting from the use of restraint and seclusion techniques in the classroom. They are also looking to spur a grassroots movement by asking supporters to sign up and take a series of weekly actions to learn about restraint and seclusion, advocate for policy change and share their stories, according to Jonathan Riethmaier of TASH, one of over two-dozen disability advocacy groups backing the new campaign.
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 In the News


Can video games make dyslexic children read better?
IGN
While the contention that video games are bad for kids is slowly, stubbornly slipping from the public conscious, it seems that study at the other end of the spectrum — how video games might be good for children — is still very much in its infancy, and often met with scepticism and disdain. A recent example of this is a paper published in Current Biology earlier this year from The University of Padua, bearing the eye-catching title "Action Video Games Make Dyslexic Children Read Better." The title is largely self-explanatory: the study claimed to show that young children aged 7-13 with dyslexia, a mental condition that can greatly hinder reading ability, could read faster after 80 minute play sessions of select minigames from Rayman Raving Rabbids.
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Brain activity in sleep may impact emotional disturbances in children with ADHD
Medical News Today
Sleep consolidates emotional memories in healthy children but not in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to research published May 29 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by TK and colleagues from TK. The study suggests these deficits in sleep-related emotional processing may exacerbate emotional problems experienced in the daytime by children with ADHD. For the study, healthy adults, healthy children and children with ADHD were shown pictures that had emotional relevance, such as a scary animal, or neutral pictures showing an umbrella or lamp.
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7 amazingly easy video ideas for capturing and keeping students' attention
THE Journal
Keeping students attentive in the 21st century classroom is no easy feat. Sure, there's the buzzword — "engagement" — that pervades education technology rhetoric, but what does engagement really look like, and how do teachers achieve it? For veteran educators Dotty Corbiere, a math specialist at Meadowbrook School in Weston, Mass., and Rushton Hurley, founder of the nonprofit organization Next Vista for Learning and a former high school Japanese language teacher and principal, the answer is video.
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No Child Left Behind: Pass or fail?
The Hill
If you are a parent of one of the 50 million public schoolchildren in the United States, the odds are your child has taken a standardized test within the past few weeks. The odds also suggest that you took such a test yourself once upon a time, though probably not as early or as often as your kids. You and your children have the federal No Child Left Behind Act to thank for the modern ubiquity of standardized testing. No Child Left Behind is something of a forgotten stepchild now, having been expired without formal reauthorization longer than it was actually in effect.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    ADHD: How many children are misdiagnosed? (NBC Latino)
Special education could face $2 billion in cuts (Disability Scoop)
Caution and the Common Core (The New York Times)
Public spending per student drops (The Wall Street Journal)
Special education best practices inspire successful expanded learning time for all students (Edutopia)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


How learning disability affect mental health
The Huffington Post
Barbara Arrowsmith-Young, author and founder of the Arrowsmith Program, writes: "In the 60 years that I have been part of the learning disabled world, I have both experienced and witnessed the suffering that is living with a learning disability. Learning disabilities are commonly considered a school-based issue; but struggling in school means struggling in life. This makes learning to be confident and acquiring a healthy mental attitude a particular challenge for those with learning disabilities. With children and youth as this year's focus for Mental Health Awareness Week, I would like to call attention to the relationship between mental health issues and learning disabilities."
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District leaders urge more time to implement Common Core State Standards
Education Week
Four organizations representing school district leaders today called for "adequate" time to manage the tricky transition to the Common Core State Standards and tests. "Adequate" isn't defined in the joint statement, however. "We must make adequate time for a thoughtful conversation about how assessments can be used to provide instructionally useful information to schools in a timely manner," say the American Association of School Administrators, the National Association of Elementary School Principals, the National Association of Secondary School Principals and the National School Boards Association.
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ADHD medications not tied to drug, alcohol abuse
Reuters
Taking Ritalin and other drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder doesn't affect a child's chances of trying or abusing alcohol and drugs later in life, a new review suggests. Researchers pooled data from 15 studies that included a total of 2,600 kids and teenagers with ADHD who were or were not medicated with stimulants and were followed for anywhere from 3 to 28 years. They found no clear difference in how many participants started using or abusing alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana or cocaine, based on how their ADHD was managed.
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Raising readers, writers and spellers
Psychology Today
Common Core State Standards — adopted by 45 states — is supposed to bring back writing in schools. Ironically, a writing revolution in schools happened 37 years ago when an eloquent professor named Donald Graves cracked the psychology of writing. Today some teachers fear Common Core is wrecking writing instruction in their classrooms. The father of the writing revolution in schools, the late Donald Graves, founded the Writing Process Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire in 1976 that would have profound impact on the teaching of writing in the English-speaking world. Graves and his research assistants conducted classroom research projects that gave authority to what he called "the writing process." Thousands of teachers came to visit and other researchers joined in and disseminated his work creating a worldwide educational movement.
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Globally, kids with disabilities struggling, UNICEF finds
Disabilities Scoop
Children with disabilities are among the world's most marginalized people, often going undocumented from birth and facing rampant discrimination, according to a new report from the United Nations Children's Fund. Globally, those with disabilities are the least likely to go to school or receive health care. Often tucked away in institutions, they are also among the most susceptible to violence, abuse and neglect, UNICEF found. The report known as "The State of the World's Children" is produced annually and this year focused on the global status of children with disabilities. The international organization is urging countries to embrace individuals with special needs, looking first at what they have to offer rather than just focusing on their deficits.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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Brain activity in sleep may impact emotional disturbances in children with ADHD
Medical News Today
Sleep consolidates emotional memories in healthy children but not in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to research published May 29 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by TK and colleagues from TK.

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Study: Brain anatomy in dyslexics varies by gender
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
The brains of males and females with dyslexia differ significantly, which suggests the learning disability needs to be treated separately in each gender, a new study has found.

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How iPads and tablets are changing the face of special education
We are Teachers
The past three years have seen a sea change in the use of technology in special education. The introduction of the iPad, followed by numerous other tablets, has put technology into the hands of students in a way unprecedented in the years before.

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Special education: Promoting more inclusion at your school
Edutopia
It is all too rare for discussions of school culture and climate and SEL to focus explicitly on students with disabilities. A shining exception is the Inclusive Schools Climate Initiative, a pilot project at Rutgers University, developed through a partnership with the Office of Special Education Programs at the NJ Department of Education. Eighteen schools are involved in the pilot project, and each one carries out an inclusion-focused assessment of school climate, the formulation of an ISCI leadership team, and the development and implementation of a School Climate Improvement Plan.
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Docs urged to address military kids' mental health
CNN
More than 2 million children have been affected by the military deployment of at least one parent within the past decade, and thousands have had to cope with a parent's death or traumatic injury, experts say. Therefore, it's imperative that pediatricians and other health care providers address the mental health and well-being of children from U.S. military families, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword MENTAL HEALTH.


Why do students with learning disabilities excel in opera?
CBC News
Researchers at UBC are studying why learning-disabled students in the university's demanding opera program excel. The study Libretti of Learning followed a group of eight students over two years to examine opera's effects. Nancy Hermiston, study co-author and opera chair at UBC, says the art helped gifted students living with attention deficit disorder and dyslexia concentrate. "Many of these gifted learning-disabled students, they tend to excel on the stage because they work best when they really have something that makes them concentrate, and really makes them focus," she said.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

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