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Insecticides may affect cognitive development in children
Nature World News
Insecticides may affect cognitive development in children, according to a new study. Pyrethroid insecticides are one of the most commonly used pesticides, with benefits in a variety of sectors including residential pest control, public health and agricultural purposes. They can also be found in many domestic products such as lice shampoo and mosquito repellent. With more toxic compounds such as organochlorides, organophosphates and carbamate having been banned due to health concerns, pyrethroids are now increasingly popular, and considered relatively safe for humans and mammals.
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Summertime for special educators: Learn something new
By: Pamela Hill
If you are a special educator and have reached the last day of school, congratulations! At some time during this month all schools that follow a traditional calendar will provide a summer break of several weeks. The special educator will have an extended time to have a break from teaching. One area of personal and professional development that will help you to strengthen your thinking and teach you about walking in the shoes of a student with diagnosed learning disabilities is to learn something new.
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Students with disabilities face uncertain paths after graduation
Education Week
Before the law that governs special education was enacted 40 years ago, youths with disabilities were often marginalized. Only about 1 in 5 children with disabilities was enrolled in public schools in 1970, according to the U.S. Department of Education. The legislation that later came to be known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act made a dramatic difference. Students with disabilities now have the right to be educated in public schools with their nondisabled peers and to be prepared for a positive and productive life after school.
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In an effort to enhance the overall content of THE LD SOURCE, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of LDA and/or reader of THE LD SOURCE, your knowledge of learning disabilities and related issues lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit. Our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.



 In the News


All learning relies on literacy
District Administrator Magazine
The biggest changes in reading instruction in the coming year center on embedding literacy across all subjects a student studies during the school day. Engineering concepts, for example, can be used to break down the plots of stories and analyze characters. And ESL specialists should collaborate with subject teachers to align instruction so students are learning the same words and concepts.
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$12.8 million in grants to improve services, outcomes for children with disabilities
U.S. Department of Education
The U.S. Department of Education announced the award of more than $12.8 million in grants to help improve services and results for students with disabilities. "We must ensure that students with disabilities receive a world-class education and that their teachers are equipped to help them be successful," said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.
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The kindergarten testing mess
The Washington Post
Kindergarten wasn't what Kimberley Asselin expected when the school year started last fall — and, unfortunately, that turned out to be a bad thing. Asselin, a first-year teacher in Virginia who had dreamed about teaching since she was a child, learned what many new teachers around the country have: That the K-12 experience has become dominated by standardized testing. And if there is one grade where it seems most detrimental and concerning, it is kindergarten.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inform Attention Related Diagnoses
Develop a comprehensive evaluation using the gold standard Conners CPT 3™, an auditory test of attention, the Conners CATA®, and the early childhood Conners K-CPT 2™. All assessments have been updated with easily interpreted reports, representative normative samples, and new scores to pinpoint the exact issue. Learn more: www.mhs.com/cpt3
 


Reading, writing, required silence: How meditation is changing schools and students
The Huffington Post
On a Wednesday afternoon in early May, after a full day of studying the Byzantine Empire and sitting through lessons on annotation and critical reading, the sixth-graders in Zsazita Walker's social studies and language arts class were, expectedly, acting like sixth-graders. School was almost over and the classroom, scattered with posters, worksheets and lesson plans, was buzzing with chatty, curious 10-, 11- and 12-year-olds who knew they'd soon be free from class.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword STUDENTS.


House looks to resurrect ESEA Bill
Education Week
Months after Republican leaders in Congress yanked a GOP-backed Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization off the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives amid sinking support from their own caucus, they appear poised to call it up again. As early as next week, according to sources, the Student Success Act could be brought to the floor under a new rule that allows members to vote on three new amendments in addition to final passage of the bill. The momentum comes after a difficult three months of whipping the bill which began losing support from Republicans after the Club for Growth and Heritage Action — two powerful conservative lobby organizations — announced their opposition to it.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Try reading this font and you'll better understand what dyslexia is like (Fast Company)
18 ways to advocate for your child with learning disabilities (By: Howard Margolis)
The daily habits of organized kids (ADDitude Magazine)
Debate persists around early reading standards (Education Week)
5 of the most extreme claims made against Common Core in the last 5 years (The Huffington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



Why students should read
TeachThought (commentary)
Terry Heick, a contributor for Teach Thought, writes: "Lately, there's something about reading that’s bothering me about how we teach reading and writing. I've written about it before and said a lot of what I say here, but never quite said what I was trying to say because I'm not sure what I really mean. It's got something to do with how schools frame it. Call it "literacy." Sterilize it. Cleave it cleanly from its human contexts until it's a school thing and good for you and you should totally do it and one day you'll be thankful you did."
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Researchers: 5 ignored factors affect outcomes for poor children
The Washington Post
School leaders and policymakers trying to improve academic results for disadvantaged children need to look outside the classroom at social and economic conditions that directly affect a child's ability to learn, according to a new report. The paper, written by Leila Morsy and Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute, a left-leaning think tank, focuses on five factors that new research suggests hinder the achievement of poor children: parenting practices in low-income households, single parenthood, irregular work schedules of parents in low-wage jobs, poor access to health care and exposure to lead.
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What to tell the school about your child's ADHD and medical needs
ADDitude Magazine
Each September parents of kids with attention deficit disorder (ADD ADHD) go through the same drill. You may wish to say nothing, but you absolutely must inform the school nurse, the classroom teacher, and other educational staff about your child's condition. If you're lucky, there will be an Individualized Education Plan or a 504 Plan in place, both of which identify and mandate the services and accommodations your child needs. If not, it's up to you to make sure that everyone involved understands how to best help your child.
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When guarding student data endangers valuable research
The New York Times
There is widespread concern over threats to privacy posed by the extensive personal data collected by private companies and public agencies. Some of the potential danger comes from the government: The National Security Agency has swept up the telephone records of millions of people, in what it describes as a search for terrorists. Other threats are posed by hackers, who have exploited security gaps to steal data from retail giants like Target and from the federal Office of Personnel Management.
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The parent's guide to privacy rights
Scholastic Administrator Magazine
Data privacy is the issue of the day — not only in the broader society but also in our nation's schools. As districts increasingly rely on technology to improve student-learning outcomes, collect and store electronic data for administrative efficiency, and provide online resources for students, many parents have expressed confusion about their rights to information that concerns their child's privacy.
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The constant movement in ADHD may help children think, perform in school
Medical News Today
The constant movement of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may be distracting — but the fidgeting also may improve their cognitive performance, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. The take-away message: The hyperactivity seen in ADHD may help children think. The study of pre-teens and teenagers with ADHD examined how movement — its intensity and frequency — correlated with accuracy on cognitively demanding tasks requiring good attention. It found that participants who moved more intensely exhibited substantially better cognitive performance.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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