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U.S. Department of Education releases results of new special education evaluation process
Education Week
Fewer states are meeting requirements for serving students with disabilities now that the U.S. Department of Education is focusing less on compliance with voluminous rules and more on how well those students are being educated, the department said recently. The move toward what the department's office of special education is calling "results-driven accountability" began last year and has already had an effect.
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The brain science behind Dyslexia
WBUR-FM
VideoBriefAbout 1 in 10 Americans struggle with dyslexia, a learning disability which can make reading a challenge. Children with dyslexia are often stigmatized, and feel the sting of failure when struggling with their disability. And that struggle can last for years. By the time a student is diagnosed with dyslexia, frequently in second or third grade, they've often already experienced numerous failures in school.

Listen to this broadcast from WBUR, Radio Boston.

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 In the News


Pediatrics group to recommend reading aloud to children from birth
The New York Times
In between dispensing advice on breast-feeding and immunizations, doctors will tell parents to read aloud to their infants from birth, under a new policy that the American Academy of Pediatrics will announce soon. With the increased recognition that an important part of brain development occurs within the first three years of a child’s life, and that reading to children enhances vocabulary and other important communication skills, the group, which represents 62,000 pediatricians across the country, is asking its members to become powerful advocates for reading aloud, every time a baby visits the doctor.
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Inspiring students with learning disabilities to take up a language
The Guardian
Jon Gore, now 25, was not diagnosed with dyslexia until after he'd struggled through French and German classes at school. "I always found the written part of it particularly hard," he says. "It's almost like a mental block when it comes to thinking what it is I need to say. I struggle with that in English, so when it comes to French and German, it's exacerbated." "I can't imagine the spelling in my mind. Sometimes I can't even begin to formulate what letters it's made up of. If I was trying to spell "bibliothéque", I know it starts with a "b", and there's got to be a "q" in there somewhere. I usually end up having to spell it phonetically, but obviously that doesn't always work out."
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The 'common' in Common Core fractures as state support falters
The Hechinger Report
The Common Core's main selling point was that new, shared standards would ensure American students were learning at the same rates across state lines. Common standards — linked to common tests — would tell schools in Illinois how they stacked up against schools in Massachusetts or California.

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Help students with disabilities succeed in college
NCLD
Many parents often wonder what will happen after their child graduates high school. How will your child get the help he deserves in college? What schools can provide the supports your child needs?

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Study: Language problems common for kids with ADHD
HealthDay News via WebMD
Children who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are nearly three times more likely to have language problems than kids without ADHD, according to new research.

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The 'common' in Common Core fractures as state support falters
The Hechinger Report
The Common Core's main selling point was that new, shared standards would ensure American students were learning at the same rates across state lines. Common standards — linked to common tests — would tell schools in Illinois how they stacked up against schools in Massachusetts or California. Now, as more states back out of the tests, the "common" in Common Core is threatened. In 2010, 45 states adopted the Common Core State Standards, a set of skills in math and English students should master in each grade.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword COMMON CORE.


Special education program brings kids back to their classrooms
RIPR-FM
VideoBriefSchools in Rhode Island spend hundreds of millions of dollars every year on special education, a broad category that includes physical and learning disabilities, emotional problems and autism. Right now, the students needing the most attention are often sent to special schools, but a growing program from Bradley Hospital shows promise in reducing the cost of special education by keeping more students in their own school districts, in their own schools.
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Nebraska officials look for path to waiver from No Child Left Behind
Omaha World-Herald
Nebraska officials are looking for a way to break loose of No Child Left Behind as the widely-spurned federal law tightens its grip on the state's public schools. Nebraska Commissioner of Education Matt Blomstedt said he is talking with federal officials about whether there is a pathway for Nebraska to obtain a waiver from No Child Left Behind and its push for 100 percent student proficiency.
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MRI scan for iron in the brain could help with ADHD diagnosis
New York Daily News
Recent research suggests iron levels in the brain could identify attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and lead to more individualized interventions. A study published in the journal Radiology has identified a magnetic reasonance imaging technique to measure brain iron levels that could provide accurate, non-invasive diagnoses. ADHD can be hard for doctors to distinguish from other psychiatric conditions, particularly because diagnosis is based on subjective clinical consultations.
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Bill aims to create dyslexia detection pilot program
WESA-FM
About 15 to 20 percent of Americans has dyslexia, a disorder that results in slow or inaccurate reading, poor spelling and writing or confusing similar words. But many cases go undetected, making schooling difficult for those who have it. A new bill that aims to address this issue just passed the House and Senate recently and awaits Pennsylvania's Gov. Tom Corbett's signature.
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7 steps to authentic learning
eSchool News
Why authentic learning? There are so many reasons to choose from, some of the most important being: providing deep purpose for learning, empowering students, providing differentiation and choice options in learning, connecting students to others locally and globally, and allowing opportunities to develop empathy, creativity and innovation skills. While there are many wonderful resources on the Web regarding Problem Based Learning Units and authentic learning, it seems best to boil it down to a common definition teachers can remember. One that has worked is real purpose, real product and a real audience.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Help students with disabilities succeed in college (NCLD)
Does the way a classroom is decorated affect learning? (The New York Times)
Children taught to read with phonics could be 2 years ahead (MadeForMums)
How state education agencies spend federal education dollars and why (Center for American Progress)
6 ways to make digital content universally accessible (eSchool News)

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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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