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Including assistive technology in teacher preparation: Exploring 1 approach
By Elissa Wolfe Poel, Jackie Wood and Naomi Schmidt in the latest edition of LDA's peer-reviewed publication "Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal," Spring 2013.
Assistive Technology is specifically addressed in the most recent reauthorization of IDEA, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (2004). The law insures that assistive devices and services are available for students with disabilities to help them access their environment at home, school, and in the work place. Therefore, it is important that teacher preparation programs in higher education establish required components for including AT in their programs of study.
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Fiber-optic pen helps see inside brains of children with learning disabilities
University of Washington via Science Daily
For less than $100, University of Washington researchers have designed a computer-interfaced drawing pad that helps scientists see inside the brains of children with learning disabilities while they read and write. The device and research using it to study the brain patterns of children will be presented June 18 at the Organization for Human Brain Mapping meeting in Seattle. A paper describing the tool, developed by the UW's Center on Human Development and Disability, was published this spring in Sensors, an online open-access journal.
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Will new tests measure any valuable skills?
MindShift
After more than ten years of national education policies like No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top, the words accountability and assessment have become synonymous at many public schools with high-stakes testing. The two government programs have attached consequences and rewards to standardized test scores, leading many educators to believe they have to teach to the test. But, as the well-known argument goes, teaching prescribed math and reading content doesn't help students build the skills like creativity, problem-solving and adaptability they need to adapt in the world outside of school.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ADHD.


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 In the News


Underdiagnosis of ADHD begins early for some groups
USA Today
New analysis finds that racial and ethnic disparities in ADHD diagnosis occur by kindergarten and continue until at least the end of eighth grade. Prior research has shown that black, Hispanic and other minority children are less likely than comparable white children to be diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, but a new study shows that this disparity starts as early as kindergarten and continues through middle school. Among those diagnosed with ADHD — the most common mental health condition among kids and teens — children who are ethnic or racial minorities are less likely to use prescription medication for the disorder, even when researchers account for such factors as health insurance coverage, socio-economic status and academic achievement.
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House committee passes partisan NCLB renewal bill
Education Week
Another markup of the Elementary and Secondary Education, another totally predictable partisan vote. The Senate education committee passed an ESEA bill with just Democratic support. This time, it was the House Education panel's turn to consider a bill to revise the No Child Left Behind Act. Everyone agrees the law is in desperate need of a makeover, but partisan divisions continue to get in the way. And today's debate on the bill, which was written by Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the committee, was no exception.
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Education chief lets states delay use of tests in decisions about teachers' jobs
The New York Times
Acknowledging that the nation's educators face large challenges in preparing students for more rigorous academic standards and tests, Arne Duncan, the secretary of education, told state education officials that they could postpone making career decisions about teachers based on performance evaluations tied to new tests. Duncan wrote in a letter to state education officers that they could delay using teacher evaluations that incorporate test results for "personnel determinations" by another year, until 2016-2017. The postponement was in response to growing complaints from teachers' unions and school administrators that they were being held accountable for results on tests before they had time to adjust to new curriculum standards.
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Summer learning loss study: Can 'summer slide' be prevented?
The Huffington Post
When summer relaxation is over and school starts back up, many students may find they've fallen behind. A recently released survey from the National Summer Learning Association confirms that teachers spend a significant amount of time reteaching material due to summer learning loss. The survey, which was based on answers from 500 teachers, found that 66 percent of teachers have to spend three to four weeks reteaching students course material at the beginning of the year, while 24 percent of teachers spend at least five to six weeks reteaching material from the previous school year.
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Mindfulness coping strategies help deal with stress
dailyRx News
Teaching kids how to cope with the everyday stress of school and life may promote emotional well-being. Mindfulness coping strategies may also work to reduce depression. A recent study tested the effectiveness of mindfulness coping strategies on adolescent students. The results of the study showed that kids who learned mindfulness techniques had lower stress and depression scores and a better sense of emotional well-being compared to kids that did not learn mindfulness.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Not all reading disabilities are dyslexia (Vanderbilt University)
A nation of kids with gadgets and ADHD (Mobiledia)
States seek flexibility during Common-test transition (Education Week)
No Child Left Behind bill passes Senate committee, but no end in sight for recasting Bush law (The Huffington Post)
Can digital games boost students' test scores? (MindShift)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


The dyslexic and creative mind
The Creative Mind
Although traditionally classified as a learning disability, dyslexia can also lead to advantages in thinking and behaving that enhance creativity. Dyslexia is defined by one authority as "a specific learning disability that is neurological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities."
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Including assistive technology in teacher preparation: Exploring 1 approach
By Elissa Wolfe Poel, Jackie Wood and Naomi Schmidt
Assistive Technology is specifically addressed in the most recent reauthorization of IDEA, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (2004).

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Study: Vision, dyslexia not linked
HealthDay News
A new brain imaging study appears to rule out one potential cause of dyslexia, finding that vision problems don't lead to the common reading disorder.

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A nation of kids with gadgets and ADHD
Mobiledia
Go to any family restaurant and you'll be surrounded by kids, ranging from toddlers to teens. Some are antsy, others are well-behaved, but a good number play on their phones and iPads. Oh, and 1-in-10 have ADHD. It's an epidemic.

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Stop penalizing boys for not being able to sit still at school
The Atlantic
Jessica Lahey, a contributor for The Atlantic, writes: "This year's end-of-year paper purge in my middle school office revealed a startling pattern in my teaching practices: I discipline boys far more often than I discipline girls. Flipping through the pink and yellow slips — my school's system for communicating errant behavior to students, advisors, and parents — I found that I gave out nearly twice as many of these warnings to boys than I did to girls, and of the slips I handed out to boys, all but one was for disruptive classroom behavior."
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Invent to learn: Makers in the classroom
MiddleWeb
The last decade and more has been a dark period for many schools. Emphasis on high-stakes standardized testing, de-professionalizing teachers, and relying on data rather than teacher expertise has created classrooms that are increasingly devoid of play, rich materials, and the time to engage in meaningful projects. What's more, the national rhetoric about the importance of STEM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) has sadly, for many schools, not been reflected in a revitalization of science or math curriculum.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Sasser, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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