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Lead in preschool kids' blood tied to behavioral problems
Medical News Today
Although it is well documented that lead exposure lowers children's IQ, we know little about its effect on their behavioral and emotional health. Now, a new study shows that emotional and behavioral problems are apparent even at relatively low levels of lead exposure in preschool children, and they go up in line with rising blood lead levels. Writing in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, Dr. Jianghong Liu of the School of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and colleagues report how they analyzed links between blood lead levels in over 1,300 Chinese preschoolers and behavioral and emotional problems, such as showing signs of being anxious, depressed or aggressive.
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Understanding 'attention deficit' in dyslexics could help improve reading
Medical Xpress
A new study from researchers in our Department of Psychology has revealed that understanding attention deficits in adults with dyslexia may help develop new techniques for reading and writing. Dyslexia is well known as a condition that impacts on visual language processing, but recently a number of studies have discovered that it is accompanied by deficits in attention and perception. As part of the study, just published online via the journal Neurocase, researchers monitored how adults with and without dyslexia responded to an "interference test." Their results revealed large differences in terms of attention deficits for adults with dyslexia.
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What will the classroom and curriculum of the future look like?
eSchool News
It's an interesting question: What will something look like or be able to do 5, 10 or 20 years down the road? Classrooms and curriculum are no different. With education stakeholders calling for reform and a stronger focus on measuring 21st-century skills, classrooms and curricula must change.
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 In the News


Common Core accused of leaving special needs students behind
Deseret News
There are 6.5 million special-education students in the U.S. today, and most are falling further behind their peers under Common Core standards. "The latest government figures show that the dropout rate for students with disabilities is twice that for non-disabled students," NPR's Claudio Sanchez reported. "Two-thirds of students with disabilities are performing well below grade level in reading and math. By the eighth grade, that figure rises to 90 percent." Secretary of Education Arne Duncan responded to the rising problem of special education failing under Common Core in a press conference, expressing his disregard for schools claiming it's enough that they are following the standards of Common Core in their special-education classrooms.
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Childhood abuse tied to dyslexia
PsychCentral
New research discovers that adults who have dyslexia are much more likely to report they were physically abused before they turned 18 than their peers without dyslexia. Researchers at the University of Toronto and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill found that 35 percent of adults with dyslexia report they were physically abused before they turned 18. In contrast, seven percent of those without dyslexia reported that they had experienced childhood physical abuse.
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Understanding 'attention deficit' in dyslexics could help improve reading
Medical Xpress
A new study from researchers in our Department of Psychology has revealed that understanding attention deficits in adults with dyslexia may help develop new techniques for reading and writing.

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Help students with disabilities succeed in college
NCLD
Many parents often wonder what will happen after their child graduates high school. How will your child get the help he deserves in college? What schools can provide the supports your child needs?

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Study: Language problems common for kids with ADHD
HealthDay News via WebMD
Children who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are nearly three times more likely to have language problems than kids without ADHD, according to new research.

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Bullying online leads to offline fear at school
Medical News Today
Cyberbullying creates fear among students about being victimized at school, a recent study by Sam Houston State University found. While traditional bullying still creates the most fear among students, cyberbullying is a significant factor for fear of victimization at school among students who have experienced bullying or disorder, such as the presence of gangs. The fear from cyberbullying is most prominent in minority populations. "It cannot be overstated — online victimization has offline consequences, and those consequences may have a number of negative effects for students, including fear of victimization," said Ryan Randa, Assistant Professor at Sam Houston State University, College of Criminal Justice.
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Can the Maker Movement infiltrate mainstream classrooms?
MindShift
At the White House Maker Faire recently, where Obama invited "makers" of all ages to display their creations, the president investigated a robotic giraffe, a red weather balloon and shot a marshmallow cannon made by a student. With so much fanfare and media attention on the event, some educators are hopeful that the idea of tinkering as a way of learning might finally have made it back to the mainstream. But will the same philosophy of discovery and hands-on learning make it into classrooms?
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Predicting dyslexia — Even before children learn to read (MindShift)
Most states deficient in special education (Disability Scoop)
Explicit instruction works best for struggling math students (U.S. News & World Report)
Funding formulas for special education benefit some districts, penalize others (Education Week)
A 'major shift' in oversight of special education (National Public Radio)

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New Obama initiative stresses equal access to good teachers
The Huffington Post
The Obama administration will announce plans to enforce a long-ignored federal mandate: a decade-old requirement that states give students of all ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds equal access to good teachers. The new initiative, called "Excellent Educators for All," aims to bring states into compliance with a teacher equity mandate in the No Child Left Behind Act, the George W. Bush-era law that requires states to reward and punish schools based on standardized test scores.
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US states greet new fiscal year with more spending, school funding
Reuters
Days before most U.S. states' new fiscal year begins, 40 states have passed budgets that boost spending and dedicate extra funding primarily for education, according to a brief by the National Association of State Budget Officers. But in many states spending increases and tax cuts are not as dramatic as their governors proposed this winter, due to softer-than-expected revenue, NASBO found. Typically, governors suggest budgets in January that legislatures use as starting points to negotiate.
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Is free play essential for learning?
Psychology Today
Dr. Marilyn Wedge, is a family therapist and the author, writes: "Three years ago, I wrote a blog here at Psychology Today called "Play and the Child's Sense of Self" in which I argued for the importance of free play in the life of a child. It turns out that having ample opportunity for free play not only has psychological advantages for a child; it has educational advantages as well."
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

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