This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.



  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Jul. 18, 2013

Home   About Us   Become a Member   Annual Conference    News    For Professionals   Contact Us





Summit Camp & Travel Programs

Comprehensive summer camp, travel, and school year programs that offer fun, success, and a sense of belonging. summitcamp.com


 


 Top Stories

States show improvement in special education
Disability Scoop
A growing number of states are meeting their responsibilities to provide special education services, federal officials say. In letters sent to each state this month, the U.S. Department of Education indicated that 38 states met their obligations to serve students with disabilities for the 2011-2012 school year. That's up from 29 the year prior. Each year, the Education Department assesses how well states fulfill their plans under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and assigns one of four ratings: "meets requirements," "needs assistance," "needs intervention" or "needs substantial intervention."
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


SHOWCASE
  Selective

Since 1926, Selective has been providing businesses like yours with the insurance solutions you need We know, Response is everything®,and we'll prove it to you when you work with us. Selective offers a wide range of insurance solutions for you.
Click here for more..
 


Common strategies for uncommon achievement
Center for American Progress
What does it take to improve a school? What kinds of programs, systems and people need to be in place for educational outcomes to improve overall? These and other questions continue to vex policymakers who — along with researchers, reformers, and advocates — pore over data and case studies looking for tools to transform schools into places where all students achieve. Sadly, there is no silver bullet. But there are features and structures of schools that have shown improvement that can help educational leaders see a path forward.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
Confidence soars with 50 phonics games and 90+ decodable stories that build phonics skills!

With Go Phonics you get the support you need to teach a student with dyslexia/LLD. Integrated tools and lesson plans are Orton-Gillingham based and compatible. This primary phonics foundation links ALL the skills. In building block fashion students learn, practice, and apply skills in decodable stories they can really read. Confidence soars!

Go Phonics Reading Program
Download Sample Lessons or Visit: www.gophonics.com
Where Students
with Learning Differences Excel


Summit View, a WASC-accredited school and college preparatory program, offers comprehensive elementary, middle, and secondary school programs for students with learning differences. An innovative and integrated curriculum utilizing the latest technology, small class sizes, and high teacher to student ratio enables students to experience academic success.
For information, visit www.summitview.org.
Students
Shouldn't Struggle!


Easy Grammar &
Daily GRAMS texts

“We began to learn grammar. These kids were getting it! You could see it in their eyes—kids who had previously done poorly were gleaming with pride... and understanding.” S.W.

Dr. Phillips includes ideas that promote mastery.
Easy to Learn!
www.easygrammar.com


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    What stops girls from learning math? (Gifted Challenges)
ADHD drugs don't boost kids' grades (The Wall Street Journal)
5 learning techniques psychologists say kids aren't getting (Psychology Today)
Personal discovery on dyslexia may aid many (The Boston Globe)
Education reform movement learns lesson from old standards (NPR)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



 In the News


Reading the brain: FDA approves first scan for diagnosing ADHD
TIME
It's the first test to diagnose the behavioral disorder using brain wave patterns, but it won't be the last. The idea of reading the brain's activity for clues to mental illness is gaining ground. As Roxanne Khamsi reported in TIME recently, researchers are learning enough about the signature patterns of normal, and abnormal brain activity that they believe it may be possible to diagnose mental illnesses ranging from depression, schizophrenia, autism and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder by studying readouts of brain waves, much in the way they now rely on elecrocardiograms to diagnose heart problems.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


  FEATURED COMPANIES
ADD ADHD LD Asperger's

Charis Hills is designed for campers with learning differences to build confidence and find success. Emphasis on social skills. Choose from over 20 recreational activities. MORE
Advertise here!

To find out how to feature your company in the LDA eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact James DeBois at 469-420-2618.
MORE


Austerity is leaving children sick with lead poisoning
ThinkProgress
Back in March, the House passed a budget written by Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., that cuts overall domestic spending even further than sequestration. But the consequences of that budget are only now becoming clear, as the House writes specific spending bills for next year. Just one of the critical programs that would fall victim to this budget is lead poisoning prevention. The House Appropriations Committee recently approved legislation to cut lead removal programs by more than half, leaving children in homes that are poisoning them every day. Decades of progress in protecting children from lead poisoning will come to an end if House Republican budget cuts become law. Lead poisoning is among the most important and overlooked national public health problems. Exposure to lead causes permanent brain damage, and half a million American children have elevated levels of lead in their blood. Lead poisoning is linked to lower IQs, learning disabilities and even criminal behavior.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword LEAD POISONING.


Tougher requirements ahead for teacher prep
Education Week
A panel tapped by the national accreditation body for teacher preparation has finalized a set of standards that, for the first time, establishes minimum admissions criteria and requires programs to use much-debated "value added" measures, where available. The action promises to have major ramifications for how programs select, prepare, and gauge the success of new teachers. Already, programs planning to seek the seal of approval from the Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation say the standards are significantly more demanding than those used by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, one of two accreditors that preceded CAEP.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Reading the brain: FDA approves first scan for diagnosing ADHD
TIME
It's the first test to diagnose the behavioral disorder using brain wave patterns, but it won't be the last. The idea of reading the brain's activity for clues to mental illness is gaining ground.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
A nation of kids with gadgets and ADHD
Mobiledia
Go to any family restaurant and you'll be surrounded by kids, ranging from toddlers to teens. Some are antsy, others are well-behaved, but a good number play on their phones and iPads. Oh, and 1-in-10 have ADHD. It's an epidemic

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Is the Common Core initiative in trouble?
The Washington Post
Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently met with Chamber of Commerce leaders and urged them to be more vocal and forceful in defending the Common Core State Standards. Why?

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


The perils of giving kids IQ tests
The Atlantic
In last week's LD Source the same book, Ungifted: Intelligence redefined ...", by Scott Barry Kaufman was reviewed, with a different interpretaion when compared to this week's article from The Atlantic. The reviewer from the "Atlantic" included information from the book that discussed using data from IQ testing as a means of gathering information important to identifying a students specific educational needs and designing the IEP.
Scott Barry Kaufman knew he was different from his classmates. The evidence was overwhelming: he was about to enter the third grade for the second time, and he was subjected to beatings on the bathroom floor, doled out by bullies who regularly reminded him that he would never, ever be anything other than a failing third-grader. As Kaufman recounts in a book released this spring, his family finally had his intelligence tested, and that afternoon with the school psychologist would change the course of his life.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
 
THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Hailey Sasser, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
Contribute news

This edition of THE LD SOURCE was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
July 11, 2013
July 3, 2013
June 27, 2013
June 20, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063