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 Top Stories

Feds: Most states failing to meet special education obligations
Disability Scoop
Federal officials indicate that less than half of states are meeting their obligations under special education law. The U.S. Department of Education says that just 19 states qualified for the "meets requirements" designation for the 2013-2014 school year. The rest of states were classified as "needs assistance" or "needs intervention." Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the Education Department must evaluate states annually on their efforts to implement special education programs. The ratings carry significant weight. If a state fails to meet requirements for two or more years, the Department of Education must take enforcement action, which can include a corrective action plan or withholding funds, among other steps.
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ESEA rewrite: What to expect from House-Senate conference
Education Week
Education leaders from both chambers of Congress begin brokering an overhaul of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act this week after recent passage of starkly differing House and Senate bills, in hopes of delivering something to the president's desk this fall.
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Monitoring accommodations for effective learning
By Pamela Hill
Students who receive special education services rely on accommodations to help them learn and to help make learning environments accessible. The accommodations are typically chosen by the special education team during a student's annual or initial Individualized Educational Plan meeting. Accommodations can also be added any time a change is necessary. However, there are also formal measures that should be considered when recommending an accommodation.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Student-Paced, Mastery-Based Math
Since 2004, Math-U-See has worked with intervention and special education teachers to reach struggling special needs math students. Math-U-See corresponds to math ability rather than traditional grade levels, so it can be used with students of any age. We provide tools and training for an explicit, structured, systematic, cumulative program using multi-sensory teaching techniques. MORE
 


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In an effort to enhance the overall content of THE LD SOURCE, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of LDA and/or reader of THE LD SOURCE, your knowledge of learning disabilities and related issues lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit. Our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.



 In the News


Senate approves a bill to revamp 'No Child Left Behind'
The New York Times
For the first time in 14 years, the Senate approved a revised version of No Child Left Behind, the signature Bush-era education law that ushered in an era of broadly reviled, high-stakes standardized testing. But the passage of the bill on a vote of 81-17, coming just a week after the House narrowly passed its own version, sets up a showdown between the two chambers, and leaves the fate of a final measure in doubt. Both bills return some key power to local governments but differ over the role of the federal government and funding allocations.
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Budget allocates $10 million for training in positive discipline
EdSource
Lawmakers have set aside $10 million in one-time funds to be used during the next three years to train teachers and administrators across the state on how to use more positive approaches to disciplining students. The funding, which was part of a trailer bill to implement the budget, is for training educators to develop a Multi-Tiered System of Supports — from creating a positive school climate for all students to providing individualized counseling to troubled students.
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Identifying literacy and learning disabilities early
Language Magazine
New research from Northwestern University has found a quick way to detect future literacy challenges in children who have not yet learned to read or write. The study, entitled Auditory Processing in Noise: A Preschool Biomarker for Literacy, found that preliterate children who were unable to successfully decipher speech in a noisy environment were more likely to have future trouble with reading and language development.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword LITERACY.


The importance of the teacher supply to education reform
Brookings
Many contemporary education reform efforts attempt to leverage teacher evaluation policy to improve teacher quality, by making the evaluation process more rigorous or by tying results more directly to student learning outcomes, for example. By increasing the demand for high-quality teaching and teachers, these reforms have had some success. However, insufficient attention to the supply of teachers may be preventing many teacher quality and evaluation reforms from realizing their full potential.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Inform Attention Related Diagnoses
Develop a comprehensive evaluation using the gold standard Conners CPT 3™, an auditory test of attention, the Conners CATA®, and the early childhood Conners K-CPT 2™. All assessments have been updated with easily interpreted reports, representative normative samples, and new scores to pinpoint the exact issue. Learn more: www.mhs.com/cpt3
 


Improving education will require strategy, commitment
Bozeman Daily Chronicle
As Congress crafts a new federal education law, it is the right time to think back about the "No Child Left Behind" experience, learning what worked and what did not, while revisiting basic elements needed for quality schools. NCLB clearly helped reveal the reality of an achievement gap that aligns with poverty, children of color, non-English speakers and students of special needs. Too many schools ceremoniously raised a flag announcing they were a "blue ribbon school," only to hide the reality that success largely resulted from students from higher wealth families (which were the majority in these schools), while other students fell further behind. NCLB forced schools and districts to come out from behind the curtain.
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K-12 college preparatory school supporting bright students’ individual learning styles.
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Districts turning to neuroscience for new instruction strategies
Education Dive
Neuroscience research has disrupted many traditional notions of students' learning ability — especially the idea that traits like IQ or ability are set in stone. Much of the research districts are using reveals just how much context and classroom structure can influence what students are able to learn and retain.
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Younger students increasingly drawn to online learning, study finds
US News and World Report
Prospective online students are skewing younger, tend to enroll in local institutions and put a program's cost and reputation at the top of their priority list, according to a recent survey. Those and other findings are outlined in "Online College Students," a report by Aslanian Market Research and the Learning House, a company that helps colleges ​and universities improve their online degree programs.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Report: Asbestos found in kids' crayons, toy kits (HealthDay News via WebMD)
Simple classroom measures may reduce the impact of ADHD (Medical News Today)
House passes ESEA rewrite 218-213; Senate debate continues (Education Week)
Accelerate learning with creative teaching techniques (By: Susan Kahn)
Senate considers No Child revision to limit federal role (The Associated Press via The Washington Post)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



Social-emotional skills on the rise
Education Week
If you've felt like the term "social-emotional learning" is gaining more buzz among educators recently, you wouldn't be wrong, according to a new study for Education Week. The study, which was released by the publication's research arm, found a steady increase in the number of educators who said social-emotional learning is very important to student achievement.
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Parent checklist flags key questions for boosting advocacy
Education Week
The U.S. Department of Education, in conjunction with several advocacy and education organizations, has released a parent checklist aimed at helping to ensure families are equipped with resources to guarantee a high-quality education for their children.
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