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House GOP pushes through curbs on No Child Left Behind
The Christian Science Monitor
Six years after Congress was supposed to reauthorize the federal No Child Left Behind education law, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill — with no Democratic support — that would roll back much of the law's accountability requirements and lock in lower levels of education funding. Supporters of HR 5, the Student Success Act, say it restores flexibility to local school districts, gives broader choice to parents, and encourages innovation by scaling back the federal footprint. Opponents say it would reverse longstanding efforts to improve education, particularly for the most disadvantaged groups of children.
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House NCLB rewrite contains adaptive-testing provision
Education Week
Among the provisions included in the newly passed, GOP-only House of Representatives reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act is language that would allow states to fulfill federal testing requirements by using computer-based adaptive tests. Recently, Education Week highlighted the growing support for the tests, which adjust the difficulty of their questions based on whether the test-taker gets prior answers correct. Education Week also highlighted a lingering controversy over the nuance of how adaptive tests should be implemented — specifically, whether the exams should be allowed to ask questions above or below a student's grade level, an approach that some disability rights advocates and testing experts vehemently oppose.
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Federal cuts force impact-aid districts to cut staff, close schools
Education Week
It's been almost five months since Congress slashed education spending through across-the-board cuts known as "sequestration," which were intended to force a still completely elusive, long-term bipartisan budget deficit-reduction deal. The school districts that became the poster children for these cuts? The ones that get money from the $1.2 billion Impact Aid program, which helps districts that have a big federal presence (such as a military base or an American Indian reservation nearby) make up for lost tax revenue. About 1,200 districts receive those funds, and a small handful rely on them heavily.
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 In the News


Study finds spatial skill is early sign of creativity
The New York Times
A gift for spatial reasoning — the kind that may inspire an imaginative child to dismantle a clock or the family refrigerator — may be a greater predictor of future creativity or innovation than math or verbal skills, particularly in math, science and related fields, according to a study published in the journal Psychological Science. The study looked at the professional success of people who, as 13-year-olds, had taken both the SAT, because they had been flagged as particularly gifted, as well as the Differential Aptitude Test.
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Helping children with learning disabilities using a computer-interfaced drawing pad
Medical News Today
For less than $100, University of Washington researchers have designed a computer-interfaced drawing pad that helps scientists see inside the brains of children with learning disabilities while they read and write. The device and research was be presented at the Organization for Human Brain Mapping meeting in Seattle. A paper describing the tool, developed by the UW's Center on Human Development and Disability, was published this spring in Sensors, an online open-access journal. "Scientists needed a tool that allows them to see in real time what a person is writing while the scanning is going on in the brain," said Thomas Lewis, director of the center's Instrument Development Laboratory.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Reading the brain: FDA approves first scan for diagnosing ADHD (TIME)
States show improvement in special education (Disability Scoop)
The perils of giving kids IQ tests (The Atlantic)
Common strategies for uncommon achievement (Center for American Progress)
A nation of kids with gadgets and ADHD (Mobiledia)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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Research sheds new light on our unique ability to learn languages
RedOrbit
A neural pathway unique to humans allows us to learn new words and languages, European scientists reported. Experts have long believed language acquisition — a distinctively human ability — depends on the integration of information between motor and auditory representation of words in the brain, although the precise neural mechanisms behind this interaction remained unclear.
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The genetics of dyslexia and language impairment
Medical News Today
A new study of the genetic origins of dyslexia and other learning disabilities could allow for earlier diagnoses and more successful interventions, according to researchers at Yale School of Medicine. Many students now are not diagnosed until high school, at which point treatments are less effective. The study is published online and in the American Journal of Human Genetics.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.


Study finds clues on how to keep kids engaged with educational games
North Carolina State University via PhysOrg.com
If you want teams of students to stay engaged while playing educational games, you might want them to switch seats pretty often. That's one finding from a pilot study that evaluated how well middle school students were able to pay attention to game-based learning tasks. Students at a Raleigh, N.C., middle school were divided into two-person teams for the pilot study. Researchers from North Carolina State University then had each team test gaming concepts for an educational game called "Engage," which allows only one student at a time to control gameplay. The researchers were trying to determine how effective educational gaming tasks were at teaching computer science concepts, but were also monitoring how engaged each student was.
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Study finds spatial skill is early sign of creativity
The New York Times
A gift for spatial reasoning — the kind that may inspire an imaginative child to dismantle a clock or the family refrigerator — may be a greater predictor of future creativity or innovation than math or verbal skills, particularly in math, science and related fields, according to a study published in the journal Psychological Science.

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Genetics of dyslexia and language impairment unraveled, earlier diagnosis to come
Medical Daily
People affected by dyslexia often go undiagnosed until they're well into high school — living years without intervention and with stunted academic performance.

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What stops girls from learning math?
Gifted Challenges
Math is for geeks. Nerds. The robotics kids. Definitely not for girls. Really? Why do some girls go from budding math scholars in grade school to a "dumbed down" shell of themselves in high school?

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4 reasons why the Common Core are losing popularity
eSchool News
In what could be compared to, well, many education reform initiatives over the years — educational technology included — a once-widely, and quickly, accepted initiative is dividing the education community; begging the question, "Are the Common Core State Standards just another flash in education's pan?" 45 states and the District of Columbia have adopted the CCSS in what was once lauded as a giant step in the right direction in trying to improve student achievement and college- and career-readiness.
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Yale initiative raises dyslexia awareness in Latino communities
Latina Lista
"People who are dyslexic cannot read." "People who are dyslexic cannot perform well in school." "A child reversing their letters is a sure sign of dyslexia." These are all common myths about dyslexia that the Multicultural Dyslexia Awareness Initiative wishes to dispel in an effort to raise awareness about the learning disability across all communities, including Latinos. Dyslexia affects one in five people, and many people in Latino communities are often left undiagnosed and not offered the proper services, which is a trend the MDAI hopes to change.
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Report: 2013 trends in online learning virtual, blended and flipped classrooms
Tech&Learning
The term "digital conversion" is becoming increasingly prevalent in school site and district office conversations about how to improve student achievement, enhance teacher effectiveness and stimulate new levels of parental engagement in schools. As discussed in Project Tomorrow's "Speak Up 2012 National Report" on the digital learning views of educators and parents, teachers are on the front lines of all of these digital conversions.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Sasser, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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