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Study: MRI might allow earlier diagnosis of dyslexia
HealthDay News
Brain scans may help diagnose people with the common reading disorder dyslexia, a new study reveals. MRI scans in 40 kindergarten children revealed a link between poor pre-reading skills and the size of a structure that connects two language-processing areas in the brain, the researchers said. Previous studies have shown that this structure — called the arcuate fasciculus — is smaller and less organized in adults with poor reading skills than in those with normal reading ability. But it wasn't known if these differences caused reading problems or resulted from a lack of reading experience.
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ADHD more likely in children with asthma or allergies
Medical News Today
Children with a history of asthma and various allergies may be at higher risk of developing ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), according to a study published in the journal Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Researchers from Boston and the Netherlands conducted a case-control study among boys from the UK General Practice Research Database. The study authors analyzed 884 boys with ADHD, and 3,536 boys without the disorder.
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Most Americans unaware of Common Core, PDK/Gallup poll finds
Education Week
Nearly two out of three Americans have never heard of the Common Core State Standards, and among those who have, fewer than half believe the new, more rigorous academic goals in English/language arts and mathematics adopted by all but four states so far will make the United States more competitive in the world, according to a new poll from Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup. Sixty-two percent of respondents in PDK/Gallup's annual national survey on public education hadn't heard of the Common Core.
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School standards' debut is rocky, and critics pounce
The New York Times
The Common Core, a set of standards for kindergarten through high school that has been ardently supported by the Obama administration and many business leaders and state legislatures, is facing growing opposition from both the right and the left even before it has been properly introduced into classrooms. Tea Party conservatives, who reject the standards as an unwelcome edict from above, have called for them to be severely rolled back.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword COMMON CORE.


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 In the News


Dyslexia researchers launch multicultural-outreach effort
Education Week
Drs. Sally and Bennett Shaywitz, the co-directors of the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity, based at Yale University, and longtime researchers of the reading disorder, have started a campaign to bring greater awareness of dyslexia to communities of color. The Multicultural Dyslexia Awareness Initiative had its first meeting earlier this month, honoring well-known people with dyslexia, such as actor and activist Harry Belafonte and author Victor Villaseñor. The initiative plans to hold more meetings across the country in coming months, Sally Shaywitz said in a conversation with Education Week. Too many children, she said, learn that they have dyslexia almost by accident, after years of struggling with school.
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Bullying less likely in children who overestimate their popularity
Medical New Today
Children who overestimate their popularity are less likely to be bullies than those who underestimate or hold more accurate assessments of their social standing, finds new research presented at the 108th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. "The more kids overestimated their popularity, the less aggression they displayed," said Jennifer Watling Neal, an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University.
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Lead poisoning's impact: Kids suspended more at school
USA Today
Scientists have long known that children with high levels of toxic lead in their bloodstream are more likely than others to behave impulsively, have shorter attention spans and lower IQs and do poorly in school. Research out Tuesday finds that even children with just moderate levels of lead in their first three years of life are nearly three times as likely to be suspended from school by the time they're 9 or 10 as those whose blood-lead levels were below recent treatment thresholds. The study, appearing in the journal Environmental Research, analyzed medical and school discipline records of 3,763 children in Milwaukee Public Schools.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Empathy: The most important back-to-school supply (Edutopia)
Centers throughout the brain work together to make reading possible (University of Southern California via Science Daily)
Special education office moves toward measuring student outcomes (Education Week)
Literature-based social intervention used by parents to help children struggling with social issues (Medical News Today)
Helping students learn the language of science (NSTA Blog)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


10 ideas to get those back-to-school juices flowing
MindShift
Educators are getting prepared to welcome students back to school this month. Many have spent the summer reading up on new teaching strategies or getting inspired by colleagues across the country. To help get those idea juices flowing, here are some MindShift articles that delve into creative work, tools and methodologies. Happy back to school.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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Study: MRI might allow earlier diagnosis of dyslexia
HealthDay News
Brain scans may help diagnose people with the common reading disorder dyslexia, a new study reveals. MRI scans in 40 kindergarten children revealed a link between poor pre-reading skills and the size of a structure that connects two language-processing areas in the brain, the researchers said.

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Special education office moves toward measuring student outcomes
Education Week
Thirty-nine states have garnered a "meets requirements" rating from the U.S. Department of Education's office of special education programs on the quality of their programs for students with disabilities.

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A nation of kids with gadgets and ADHD
Mobiledia
Go to any family restaurant and you'll be surrounded by kids, ranging from toddlers to teens. Some are antsy, others are well-behaved, but a good number play on their phones and iPads. Oh, and 1-in-10 have ADHD. It's an epidemic.

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Poll: Demographics divide schools as minority, low-income parents see serious problems in education
The Associated Press via The Huffington Post
Minority and low-income parents are more likely to see serious problems in their schools — from low expectations to bullying to out-of-date technology and textbooks — than those who are affluent or white, according to an Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research Poll. Overall impressions of the nation's schools and teachers are similarly positive among all groups of parents, but deep demographic differences emerge in the details of how parents see teachers, schools and even their own roles in their children's education.
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Thousands caught in special education testing snafu
Disability Scoop
A leading education firm is acknowledging that it messed up when evaluating alternative assessments for thousands of students with disabilities. Pearson said that there were errors affecting more than 4,400 students who were part of the Virginia Alternate Assessment Program, which offers alternative assessments for students with significant cognitive disabilities, the company said. Unlike traditional testing, the alternative assessments are designed to measure student progress by evaluating a portfolio of work completed over the course of the year.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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