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Schools obligated to maintain IEPs when kids move
Disability Scoop
Schools have a special responsibility to provide continuity when students with disabilities move from one district to another, federal education officials say. In a letter to state directors of special education this summer, officials from the U.S. Department of Education clarified that schools have a duty under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act to provide comparable services to "highly mobile" students as they move between districts. This group includes kids from military families, those in foster care as well as migrants and children who are homeless, among others who move often, the department said.
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Feds invest $10 million into research for severe learning disabilities
Education Week
Developing strategies to help elementary students with the most severe learning disabilities is the focus of a new research project to be based at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. The National Center for Special Education Research awarded a 5-year, $10 million grant to the university to create an "Accelerated Academic Achievement Research Center." Between 2,000 and 3,000 students in Nashville schools will participate in the research. Doug Fuchs, a professor of special education and the grant's principal investigator, said in an interview that the academic performance of students with disabilities continues to be poor, even with a move toward inclusion and instructional strategies such as response to intervention.
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New ADHD test is progress against skepticism
The Boston Globe
For years, the growth in the number of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder has prompted skeptics to ask whether the condition is over-diagnosed. Couldn’t some of the nearly one in 10 adolescents diagnosed in the United States just be more rambunctious than their classmates? Or are some simply immature for their grade, as one 2010 study suggested? And why do some kids appear to outgrow ADHD with age? Without a single medical test to prove otherwise, the uncertainty surrounding the disorder — and the drugs needed to control it — has been hard to quiet.
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Technology helps special education students succeed
The Hanford Sentinel
A new focus on technology could be helping Kings County special education students learn better and increase interest in class. With more and more school districts making iPads, computers and other devices available to students for class use, teachers and special education students have more control than ever on how and what they learn. According to some local teachers, the devices have helped students' writing and communication skills as well as got them more interested in coming to class.
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 In the News


Supporting students with dyslexia: Tips, tricks and tech for teachers
The Guardian
1.2 million children in the U.K. have dyslexia, a print disability where students have difficulty reading and interpreting meaning. For them, though words are visible, they may swim or dance on the page and this can seriously affect their studies and performance. But with the right support from their teachers and the use of technology, simple changes can make a big difference.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIC.


Parents' goals guide ADHD treatment choice
HealthDay News
Parents' goals for treating their child's attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder tend to steer the treatment in a distinct direction, new research shows. When parents' main concern was their child's academic performance, they often chose medications as the treatment of choice, but if parents were more worried about their child's behavior they tended to opt for behavioral therapy as an initial treatment.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    With Common Core, fewer topics covered more rigorously (The New York Times)
Could a simple font help dyslexics read? (Daily Mail)
Researchers hoping to overhaul special education (Lawrence Journal-World)
6 ways to motivate students to learn (MindShift)
Say what? 5 ways to get students to listen (Edutopia)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Will new Common Core Standards mean less teaching to the test?
NPR
One of the big questions as Florida and 44 other states transition to new education standards and new tests over the next few years is how much time will teachers have to spend teaching to the test? Teachers complain that they can only spend classroom time on items which will appear on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. In addition, another complaint is that class time is used to teach kids how to take a test rather than imparting more important knowledge.
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Apps are the new flashcards for kids
Omaha World-Herald
Teachers, especially those in lower grades, for years have sent home notes encouraging parents to practice flash cards with their youngsters and to read for 20 minutes a day. These days, there's an app for that. Some schools and teachers have begun recommending educational apps and websites for families to use at home. They believe the technology, and the tools that come with it, help draw kids deeper into lessons.
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School takes on dyslexia
The Advocate
Just a few steps away from a Piccadilly restaurant, Sarah Reling is working with her second-graders in a new kind of public school. "So you have a vowel, two consonants and a silent 'e,'" Reling said. “Is that vowel long or short?" The lesson is part of a daily, intense focus on reading at the Louisiana Key Academy, a just-opened charter school that caters to children from kindergarten through second grade with dyslexia.
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More parents opting kids out of standardized tests
The Associated Press via The Huffington Post
While his eighth-grade classmates took state standardized tests this spring, Tucker Richardson woke up late and played basketball in his Delaware Township driveway. Tucker's parents, Wendy and Will, are part of a small but growing number of parents nationwide who are ensuring their children do not participate in standardized testing. They are opposed to the practice for myriad reasons, including the stress they believe it brings on young students, discomfort with tests being used to gauge teacher performance, fear that corporate influence is overriding education and concern that test prep is narrowing curricula down to the minimum needed to pass an exam.
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Common Core in action: Math in the middle school classroom
Edutopia
Aligning instruction to meet the Common Core State Standards is the new norm for educators across most of the United States. In the middle school math classroom, technology can be used to help students reach mastery of these Common Core skills. Let's take a look at a sixth grade geometry standard and how, using technology, teachers can promote engagement through student-centered exploration of this skill.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Will new Common Core Standards mean less teaching to the test?
NPR
One of the big questions as Florida and 44 other states transition to new education standards and new tests over the next few years is how much time will teachers have to spend teaching to the test?

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Study: MRI might allow earlier diagnosis of dyslexia
HealthDay News
Brain scans may help diagnose people with the common reading disorder dyslexia, a new study reveals. MRI scans in 40 kindergarten children revealed a link between poor pre-reading skills and the size of a structure that connects two language-processing areas in the brain, the researchers said.

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Reading the brain: FDA approves first scan for diagnosing ADHD
TIME
It’s the first test to diagnose the behavioral disorder using brain wave patterns, but it won’t be the last. The idea of reading the brain's activity for clues to mental illness is gaining ground.

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New school year brings sequestration pain for many districts
NPR
The superintendent of the Lancaster, Pa., school district is meeting with teachers and staff at George Washington Elementary. It's the start of a new school year, and he's trying to sound upbeat about the district's finances. "We continue to lose 5 and 10 percent of budgets each year," Pedro Rivera tells them. "And our overall goal is to make those plans and stretch out dollars to not impact you, because no kids should go without. Right?" Applause is polite but scattered, and Rivera's question hangs in the air. Employees here know the superintendent can't protect kids from the cuts the district is having to make.
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What if you only had 5 minutes to inspire a student?
Education Week
First impressions are important. We know this. We've heard about it in commercials and read about it in books. The statement, "You don't get a second chance to make a first impression," is a popular statement that is ingrained in our psyche. As much as we often think this only means adult-to-adult relationships, it also pertains to the relationships we have with our students.
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Recess can reduce bullying and prepare kids to learn, research says
The Washington Post
When D.C. students discovered that recess had been cut to a minimum of 15 minutes per day, many parents launched an immediate protest. Others merely shrugged. "Teachers should be teaching. Students should be learning," wrote Steve Sweeney, a parent at Tyler Elementary on Capitol Hill, whose three daughters told him that recess was no more than a chunk of unstructured social time in the middle of the day. But research released this spring showed that recess — when it's well-organized — can make a real difference in schools, resulting in students who feel safer, bully less and are more ready to learn.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

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