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Federal funding targets technology for students with disabilities
THE Journal
A new $1.4 million federal grant will fund the establishment of a Center on Technology and Disability. The goal of the award is to help children with disabilities, their families, and their schools to access and use assistive technology to improve learning outcomes. The grant, administered by the United States Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, was funded through the Technology and Media Services for Individuals with Disabilities program, authorized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. It was awarded to Family Health International, which will operate the center along with American Institutes for Research and PACER Center.
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E-readers can make reading easier for those with dyslexia
Smithsonian via Science Daily
As e-readers grow in popularity as convenient alternatives to traditional books, researchers at the Smithsonian have found that convenience may not be their only benefit. The team discovered that when e-readers are set up to display only a few words per line, some people with dyslexia can read more easily, quickly and with greater comprehension. Their findings are published in the Sept. 18 issue of the journal PLOS ONE.
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In push for Common Core, many parents left uneducated
NPR
Forty-five states have adopted the Common Core State Standards, the first-ever national academic standards for students. But opposition is growing, and some lawmakers are having second thoughts about their states' support. Meanwhile, proponents of the standards are still struggling to explain the initiative to parents, many of whom say they've never even heard of the Common Core.
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 In the News


Dyslexia really a form of creative genius?
Las Vegas Guardian Express
Imagine yourself at the back of a classroom on your first day of school. The scene painted before you is full of colors, faces and imagery dancing in tides of letters on the wall and voices from the hall. It seems so magical, mystical even, the way the walls come together to meet the floor, splaying out into a colored array of children's costume cloaks and pencils squared by rectangular sheets of white paper. The picture is beautiful. You can almost hear the music coming out of the bricks, aware of how many times the carpenter placed hands to the wall in order to construct such a meeting space. Then the teacher writes three letters next to one another on the black board and speaks the word they supposedly make. The artistic scene crumbles from around your eyes as the teacher calls your name and asks you to read the next three letters written, for they hold no meaning and no charm. Could this be your child? Is dyslexia really a form of creative genius?
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Kids yoga may help relieve ADHD
The Huffington Post
September ushers in autumn, back-to-school, and National Yoga Month. Designated by the Department of Health & Human Services, National Yoga Month features yoga's numerous health benefits. Now research reports that yoga may help relieve attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children. ADHD is one of the most common childhood behavioral disorders. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 8.4 percent of American children are diagnosed with ADHD.
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Guide to supporting students with dyslexia published
Medical Xpress
The Institute of Physics (IOP) has produced a practical guide to supporting Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics (STEM) students with dyslexia — thought to be about 5 percent of all STEM students in higher education. It aims to show how dyslexia affects students in STEM and describes some simple measures for making teaching and learning more accessible.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Why teaching mindfulness benefits students' learning (MindShift)
Students' happiness at school goes a long way in learning (News-Leader)
Special education spending declines (Disability Scoop)
Youth more likely to be bullied at schools with anti-bullying programs, UT Arlington researcher finds (Medical News Today)
How educators can address parents' confusion about Common Core (MindShift)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


US states still holding back on school spending
Reuters via Yahoo News
Public schools around the United States are still waiting to feel the recovery from an economic recession that officially ended four years ago, mostly because states have kept education spending low and property taxes remain depressed, according to a report. At least 34 states are providing less funding per student in the current school year than before the recession hit. Moreover, at least 15 have lower funding than a year ago, according to the liberal-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, which closely tracks state spending.
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Federal funding targets technology for students with disabilities
THE Journal
A new $1.4 million federal grant will fund the establishment of a Center on Technology and Disability. The goal of the award is to help children with disabilities, their families, and their schools to access and use assistive technology to improve learning outcomes.

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Dyslexia in the classroom
Everyday Health
Dyslexia is the most common learning disability, affecting one out of every five children. Most people who have it are never formally diagnosed. It's an invisible problem that makes school incredibly challenging for millions of children, many of whom aren't getting the services and support they need.

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Study: MRI might allow earlier diagnosis of dyslexia
HealthDay News
Brain scans may help diagnose people with the common reading disorder dyslexia, a new study reveals. MRI scans in 40 kindergarten children revealed a link between poor pre-reading skills and the size of a structure that connects two language-processing areas in the brain, the researchers said.

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School counselors urged to end stigma over mental illness
Sun Sentinel
A seminar that encouraged counselors to alter the stigma of mental illness at their schools assumed a special urgency as a rash of shootings, most recently at the Washington Navy Yard, focuses the nation's attention on mental health. More than 100 elementary school counselors in the Palm Beach County School District learned a new curriculum aimed at fourth- and fifth-graders called "Breaking The Silence: Teaching the Next Generation About Mental Illness."
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School districts aim for age-appropriate bullying prevention
Sioux City Journal
Kristin Whitsel slips Slowdown Snail onto her hand and asks her kindergarten class why he's there. Without hesitation, a little girl answers that the puppet reminds them to slow down and not be so bouncy and talkative. Whitsel nods her head in agreement. "He reminds us to slow down and think, think, think about how we treat others," Whitsel said. In another wing at Sioux City's Spalding Park Elementary School, Tina Buhrman teaches her fifth-graders about supportive behavior through a scenario in which an aunt's playful teasing embarrasses her nephew in front of his friends. She shows her class a picture of a young boy placing a comforting hand on his friend's shoulder.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Sasser, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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