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Mixed reviews to Common Core highlight of Education Nation town hall
The Hechinger Report
Students and teachers at the annual Education Nation town hall on Sunday expressed mixed reactions to the Common Core, mirroring divisions in the wider national conversation about new standards in math and English adopted by 45 states and the District of Columbia. "I see students rolling their eyes," said Melissa Harris-Perry, MSNBC host and moderator of the Student Town Hall, after College Board president David Coleman — who was deeply involved in writing the standards — promoted their value before several hundred students.
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Does class size matter?
Education Week (commentary)
Elementary school principal Peter DeWitt writes: "This is not meant to be political ... Nor is it meant to make absolute generalizations ... Some teachers do really well with large class sizes....but don't do well with small ones. This happens because they can draw in a large group of students and create an intimate setting much like a great speaker can draw in a large audience. Other teachers have the complete opposite talent. They do a spectacular job with a small class size because they need to make personal connections with every child in their class."
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Deciding who sees students' data
The New York Times
When Cynthia Stevenson, the superintendent of Jefferson County, Colo., public schools, heard about a data repository called inBloom, she thought it sounded like a technological fix for one of her bigger headaches. Over the years, the Jeffco school system, as it is known, which lies west of Denver, had invested in a couple of dozen student data systems, many of which were incompatible. In fact, there were so many information systems — for things like contact information, grades and disciplinary data, test scores and curriculum planning for the district's 86,000 students — that teachers had taken to scribbling the various passwords on sticky notes and posting them, insecurely, around classrooms and teachers' rooms.
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 In the News


Dyslexia is more common than you think
Health
Dyslexia is not a disease; it’s a neurological disorder, often hereditary and a condition that you are born with. People with dyslexia are not stupid or lazy. Most have average or above-average intelligence, and they work very hard to overcome their learning problems. It interferes with the acquisition and processing of language. There are differences in how people think. Non-dyslexics have verbal thoughts, which are thinking in words and has a linear process that occurs with a speed of about 150 words per minute. Dyslexics have non-verbal thoughts, which are thinking in pictures, where the picture grows as the thought process adds more concepts. Therefore, it’s much faster, possibly a thousand times faster.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Navigating special education disputes in schools (District Administration Magazine)
Good talk: Raising smart learners through rich conversations (MindShift)
16 engaging homework help resources (eSchool News)
Clinician observations of preschoolers' behavior help to predict ADHD at school age (Medical Xpress)
Sequestration cuts sting, say Impact Aid districts (Education Week)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


5 things adults need to know about cyberbullying
Psychology Today
According to a recent study by the Cyberbullying Research Center, approximately 20 percent of kids aged 11-18 say they have been victims of online aggression. In a world of catastrophized headlines and sensational sound bites, these numbers don't actually sound so bad, but take the time talk to any school-aged technology-user and you will no doubt gather that the danger posed by cyberbullying is not in the breadth of its perpetrators and victims, but rather in the depth of damage that online aggression can cause. Just what is it that makes cyberbullying so bad?
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CYBERBULLYING.


New laws on testing for Dyslexia launch, without clear rules
Press of Atlantic City
New laws to get more help for children with reading disabilities have taken effect, but parents may see few changes in their child's school this year. School district officials are waiting for the New Jersey Department of Education to provide regulations and guidelines for how to implement the new laws. A bill that would require all children be tested for potential reading disorders did not pass the Assembly and is being revised.
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What the shutdown means for disability services
Disability Scoop
As the first U.S. government shutdown in more than 17 years takes hold, some programs benefiting people with disabilities will continue with business as usual while others grind to a halt. The shutdown, which began Oct. 1, comes after Congress failed to reach a deal to fund the federal government for the new fiscal year starting in October. Under a shutdown, some services considered "essential" will continue operating while many other government activities will come to a standstill as 800,000 federal workers are sent home until a new budget takes effect.
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Lack of empathy keeps victims of bullying from getting help they need
The Tennessean
Bullying prevention and intervention efforts will be recognized across the United States this October. Activities and events will focus on helping young people, their families and schools. Even our workplaces will address the issue of bullying and harassment. Practitioners, researchers and leaders in the field of education, psychology and social work continue to search for answers to this perplexing issue.
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Recession continues for classrooms as school funding lags
Bloomberg
As she hands out student papers to juniors in her English class at Nathan Hale High School in Tulsa, Oklahoma, teacher Jessica West tells them she needs their help grading. She has 216 students this year, up from 150 in past years. One class has 39. "I just realized, time-wise, I can't do it on my own," she said. Tulsa's public-school class sizes have swollen after state education cuts that linger amid the economic recovery. Oklahoma is one of 34 states spending less per pupil in kindergarten through 12th grade this year than six years ago, when adjusted for inflation, the Washington-based Center on Budget & Policy Priorities said in a report. Oklahoma's 23 percent reduction was deepest, followed by Alabama, Arizona and Kansas.
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Maine data on student restraint, seclusion to help guide policies
Portland Press Herald
Maine schools reported that more than 850 students were physically restrained and hundreds were placed in seclusion in the last year, according to the first statewide data on the sometimes controversial methods that schools use to handle out-of-control students. The information, by the state Department of Education, is part of a years-long effort to more closely define what constitutes restraint and seclusion, describe when a teacher is allowed to restrain a student, and spell out mandatory reporting to parents, local school officials and the state.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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What the shutdown means for disability services
Disability Scoop
As the first U.S. government shutdown in more than 17 years takes hold, some programs benefiting people with disabilities will continue with business as usual while others grind to a halt. The shutdown, which began Oct. 1, comes after Congress failed to reach a deal to fund the federal government for the new fiscal year starting in October.

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New ADHD test is progress against skepticism
The Boston Globe
For years, the growth in the number of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder has prompted skeptics to ask whether the condition is over-diagnosed. Couldn't some of the nearly one in 10 adolescents diagnosed in the United States just be more rambunctious than their classmates?

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What stops girls from learning math?
Gifted Challenges
Math is for geeks. Nerds. The robotics kids. Definitely not for girls. Really? Why do some girls go from budding math scholars in grade school to a "dumbed down" shell of themselves in high school? What happens to these gifted girls who love the logic, complexity and challenge of math, but feel they must forego their passion to fit in?

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Report: Common math standards 'lower the bar'
Education Week
A new paper argues that the common standards in math do not demand a level of skill that is sufficient for selective colleges, or for students planning careers in math or science. In a white paper released today, the Boston-based Pioneer Institute, one of the most vocal critics of the Common Core, seeks to back up its argument with comments made by one of the math standards' lead writers, Jason Zimba.
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How to become a super-learner with standard apps
Psychology Today
It's that time of year when many students start to worry about how they're doing in their classes. Commonly, students approach instructors with similar complaints: They're spending a lot of time studying and don't understand why that isn't leading to good test performance. As instructors, my colleagues and I often hear things like, "I re-read my notes several times," or "I looked at the material and felt like I understood it when I was looking at it, so I don't understand why I did so badly on the test." Usually, it's not that students aren’t spending time studying. Rather, it's that they're simply not doing the right things with their time.
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Transition program for students with disabilities victim of shutdown
Education Week
There's been little impact so far from the government shutdown on K-12 schools around the country, but a handful of public and private school students in the Washington area are an unfortunate exception. These students, about 40 in all, are part of a national program called Project SEARCH, which helps prepare students with disabilities for the workforce. The program, which is operated by a non-profit organization in Cincinnati, helps students and young adults with disabilities gain career experience and workplace skills through a blend of classroom instruction and on-the-job training. The interns, who are typically in their final year of eligibility for special education services, spend a year at a range of job sites, including hospitals, banks and universities.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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