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K-12 advocates braced for fresh budget battles
Education Week
School districts anxiously awaiting another round of across-the-board cuts to federal education programs will have to endure another few months of uncertainty, under a bipartisan deal that put an end to the first government shutdown in nearly two decades and prevented the nation from defaulting on its debt. Instead of breathing a sigh of relief as the impasse came to an end, education advocates are steeling themselves for yet another high-stakes budget battle. The agreement signed by President Barack Obama Oct. 17 to end the partial shutdown would keep all programs in the U.S. Department of Education running at current funding levels until Jan. 15.
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Dyslexia center offers alternative teaching mode for kids
The Voice
You can't fit a square peg in a round hole, but you can add some corners to the hole so the peg goes in clean. In the same way, children with dyslexia can learn the same things others do, but not in the same manner. According to the Michigan Dyslexia Institute, "the presence of dyslexia does not indicate a lack of intelligence. The core weakness underlying dyslexia is a unique, neurologically based deficit in processing phonetic information. It results in difficulty in decoding words and/or slower reading speed and/or poor reading comprehension."
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What teaching teaches the teacher
Edutopia
The Dixie Diarist, a special education teacher, writer and artist, writes: "I'm a special education teacher who thinks kids are the most important people on Earth, and that teachers and headmasters and principals and assistant principals — as sneaky as they are — are pretty darn important to the educational process, too. I became a teacher when I was old enough to have legitimate ear hair concerns, backed up with a whole lot of life and work experience. And the classroom gave me a whole lot more — ear hair included."
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 In the News


Non-regular bedtimes tied to kids' behavior problems
Reuters
Kids without a regular bedtime tend to have more behavior problems at home and at school, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when children started going to sleep at a more consistent time, their behavior improved as well. "If you are constantly changing the amounts of sleep you get or the different times you go to bed, it's likely to mess up your body clock," said Yvonne Kelly, who led the study.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Modern technology and new approaches help kids with dyslexia (Deseret News)
Smart strategies that help students learn how to learn (MindShift)
5 ways to motivate young writers and readers (Psychology Today)
What makes a successful tutor? (Edutopia)
EEG brainwave tests help diagnose ADHD symptoms (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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Strong parent-professional partnerships
Psychology Today
Decades of research show that when families and schools partner together, children are better positioned to reach their greatest potential as learners and active members of the school community. There's simply no doubt that parental involvement is directly linked to students with higher self-confidence and more positive attitudes toward school and learning. From better attendance and higher grades, to better homework completion rates and higher graduation rates, the most consistent predictor of high academic achievement and positive social adjustment for children is engaged parents.
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On the road to school success
Politico
Lagging far behind their international peers. Shamefully low reading and math competency. A staggering achievement gap. We've heard the alarming statistics about the trajectory of American students. After 10 years, No Child Left Behind has failed to put American children back on a competitive academic track. But we are beginning to see real results in America's cities, the epicenters of innovation, including the four we lead: Denver; Providence, R.I.; San Antonio; and Sacramento, Calif.
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School psychologists call for evidence-based practices, especially for students who struggle with writing
Medical News Today
Writing instruction in U.S. classrooms is "abysmal" and the Common Core State Standards don't go far enough to address glaring gaps for students and teachers, a Michigan State University education scholar argues. In a new study, Gary Troia calls for a fresh approach to professional development for teachers who must help students meet the new writing standards. His research, funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences, appears in the journal School Psychology Review.
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Keep bullying on the front burner
Edutopia
Sadly, it seems that terrible tragedy needs to keep striking in order for bullying to retain its status as worthy of serious efforts to eliminate it. The latest incident involves 12-year-old Rebecca Sedwick's leap to her death in response to persistent cyber-bullying, and the subsequent arrest of two juvenile female honor students. While all this attention spotlights the serious consequences of this stubborn issue, schools and parents must be equally persistent in providing constant reminders of the dangerous and damaging impact caused by hurtful words, threats and actions when horrors like this aren't center stage.
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What do Common Core and the fiscal fight have in common?
Education Week (commentary)
Quick political quiz for education nerds: What do the shutdown/almost-default-on-the-national-debt and common core have in common? I'll give you a minute ... Give up? They're both issues that divide the GOP. In particular, they are areas on which the grassrootsy, tea party, activisty side of the Republican Party doesn't exactly see eye-to-eye with the business community.
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Why kids take on adults' math anxiety
MindShift
We know a lot about how relationships can enhance learning. We learn better when we "apprentice" ourselves to someone more knowledgeable, for example; when we ourselves teach others; and when we discuss and debate with our peers. But there are also times when relationships suppress learning. This is the case when parents and teachers — figures of towering importance in the world of children — pass on negative views about particular academic subjects. This passing-on is not deliberate, of course. No parent or teacher would wish to impart feelings of anxiety or aversion regarding learning. And yet that's often just what happens, according to Elizabeth Gunderson, a researcher at the University of Chicago.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
K-12 advocates braced for fresh budget battles
Education Week
School districts anxiously awaiting another round of across-the-board cuts to federal education programs will have to endure another few months of uncertainty, under a bipartisan deal that put an end to the first government shutdown in nearly two decades and prevented the nation from defaulting on its debt.

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Kids yoga may help relieve ADHD
The Huffington Post
September ushers in autumn, back-to-school, and National Yoga Month. Designated by the Department of Health & Human Services, National Yoga Month features yoga's numerous health benefits.

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Special education testing standards may soon be tightened
Disability Scoop
The U.S. Department of Education wants to do away with a rule that allows states to count some students with disabilities as academically proficient even if they do not meet grade-level standards.

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The not-so-hidden cause behind the ADHD epidemic
The New York Times
Between the fall of 2011 and the spring of 2012, people across the United States suddenly found themselves unable to get their hands on ADHD medication. Low-dose generics were particularly in short supply. There were several factors contributing to the shortage, but the main cause was that supply was suddenly being outpaced by demand. The number of diagnoses of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder has ballooned over the past few decades. Before the early 1990s, fewer than 5 percent of school-age kids were thought to have ADHD. Earlier this year, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that 11 percent of children ages 4 to 17 had at some point received the diagnosis — and that doesn't even include first-time diagnoses in adults.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ADHD.


ADHD kids often show autistic traits
Psych Central
Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder often exhibit autistic traits, which can lead to even greater problems with socialization, according to new research presented at the 26th European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Congress. Previous research has shown that children with autism spectrum disorder often also have a diagnosis of ADHD. This new study suggests that the reverse may also be true.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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