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A Different Approach Makes All The Difference

Educating children with Language Learning Disabilities and Learning Differences


 


 Top Stories

Helping parents deal with learning and attention issues
The New York Times
Nonprofit groups specializing in children's learning and attention issues will introduce a new website and a public service advertising campaign that was created with the Advertising Council. The website, Understood.org, is intended to help parents better understand these issues and provide advice on dealing with them. According to the 2014 State of Learning Disabilities Report from the National Center for Learning Disabilities, one in five people in the United States age 3 to 20 has problems with reading, math, writing, focus and attention.
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Looking to share your expertise?
In an effort to enhance the overall content of THE LD SOURCE, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of LDA and/or reader of THE LD SOURCE, your knowledge of learning disabilities and related issues lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit. Our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.


Holidays vs. standards: Which curriculum rules your school?
By: Thomas Van Soelen
I remember that in elementary schools 30 years ago, the year was chronologically marked by holidays. We started with a summer story, then a scarecrow or scary story, followed by a turkey story and ending the year with something about a snowman. The new year would offer a change of pace with nonfiction text, then it was back to narratives: Valentine's Day, St. Patrick's Day and Easter bunnies. But in the age of Common Core and far more rigorous standards, are we still allowing the hidden curriculum of holidays and seasons to run the show?
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Leveled Guided Reading - 93% Decodable

Help struggling readers build ACCURACY! Go Phonics teaches a strong foundation of phonics and language arts, applied in 7 volumes of leveled, phonetically sequenced, decodable stories. The phonics sequence minimizes confusion (Orton-Gillingham compatible). Lesson plans, 50 phonics fluency games, worksheets prep them for success. Sample Stories/Overview download: www.gophonics.com
 


Understanding the causes of dyslexia for effective intervention
Edutopia
For most of the 40-plus years the term "dyslexia" has been in existence — and although the diagnosis has long been considered a "learning disability" — it has been based on comparisons with average readers. Simply put, a child could be diagnosed with dyslexia if he or she shows an IQ in the "normal" range but falls at or below the 10th percentile on standardized reading tests. This cut-off has been arbitrary, often varying from district to district and based on Response to Intervention criteria. As a result, a child who falls at the 12th percentile might be considered a poor reader while a child at the 10th percentile would be diagnosed with dyslexia.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.



 In the News


Better academic support in high school crucial for low performers with ADHD
Medical Xpress
New research reveals that high school students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are using an unexpectedly high rate of services for their age group, yet many low achievers with ADHD are not getting the academic supports they need. Scientists from UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute and several other universities published the findings in School Mental Health after examining data for a large national sample of high school students with ADHD.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Student-Paced, Mastery-Based Math

Since 2004, Math-U-See has worked with intervention and special education teachers to reach struggling special needs math students. Math-U-See corresponds to math ability rather than traditional grade levels, so it can be used with students of any age. We provide tools and training for an explicit, structured, systematic, cumulative program using multi-sensory teaching techniques. MORE
 


How standing desks can help students focus in the classroom
MindShift
The rise of the standing desk may appear to be a response to the modern, eat-at-your-desk, hunched-over worker chained to her computer, but history paints a different picture: Hemingway, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson all stood while they worked. Donald Rumsfeld had a standing desk, and so did Charles Dickens. Workplaces are moving toward more standing desks, but schools have been slower to catch on for a variety of reasons, including cost, convenience, and perhaps the assumption that "sit down and pay attention" is the best way to learn.
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These are the states where kids have the best opportunities in education
The Huffington Post
While more students are graduating from high school and college, the number of young students enrolled in preschool in recent years has stagnated. A new index from the nonprofit groups Opportunity Nation and Measure of America looks at the level of opportunity afforded to citizens around the country in the areas of education, jobs and local economy, community health and civic life. The index ranks the best areas for educational opportunity, based on on-time high school graduation rates, the percentage of adults with an associate's degree or higher — and on preschool enrollment rates. And while the report found that levels of opportunity in America have improved overall since 2011, that accomplishment has not been the case for getting kids enrolled in preschool.
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Bullying of students with disabilities addressed in guidance to America's schools
U.S. Department of Education
As part of National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, the U.S. Education Department's Office for Civil Rights issued guidance to schools reminding them that bullying is wrong and must not be tolerated — including against America's 6.5 million students with disabilities. The Department issued guidance in the form of a letter to educators detailing public schools' responsibilities under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of Americans with Disabilities Act regarding the bullying of students with disabilities. If a student with a disability is being bullied, federal law requires schools to take immediate and appropriate action to investigate the issue and, as necessary, take steps to stop the bullying and prevent it from recurring.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Ensuring early reading literacy (District Administration Magazine)
Which are the most educated cities in the US — and why? (By: Archita Datta Majumdar)
Collaborating with students: Invite them to the IEP process (By: Pamela Hill)
State education funding lags behind pre-recession levels (U.S. News & World Report)
Why teaching kindness in schools is essential to reduce bullying (Edutopia)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



White House is root of test-reduction rhetoric, sources say
Education Week
President Barack Obama appears to be behind his administration's recent rhetorical push on the need to reconsider the number of tests students take, sources say. And the president's new thinking on tests would seem to put U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan in a pretty awkward position. For the first six years of his term in office, Duncan has bet big on student scores on state tests, pressing states to use them in pivotal decisions, such as teacher evaluations.
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Makerspaces for students with special needs
Edutopia
Maker education is a new school of educational thought which strives to deliver constructivist, project-based learning curriculum and instructional units. Makerspaces can be full high school workshops with a bevy of high-tech tools, or as small and low tech as one corner of an elementary classroom. What defines a makerspace isn't just the tools and equipment, but the learning that happens as students begin making and creating projects. Educators need to design these spaces to reach a diverse set of learners, particularly populations underserved in STEM subjects, and students with neurological differences, learning differences and special needs.
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Common Core revolt goes local
POLITICO
School districts from New Hampshire to Oregon are revolting against the coming Common Core tests. Even as political leaders in both red and blue states continue to back away from the standards — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is the latest example — the hottest battles have shifted to the local level, where education officials are staging public revolts against state and federal mandates to administer Common Core exams.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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