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US office of civil rights decision about students with disabilities in a virtual charter school
U.S. Department of Education
The U.S. Department of Education announced that its Office for Civil Rights has entered into an agreement with Virtual Community School of Ohio to ensure compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act for students with disabilities at the school. This first-of-its-kind resolution promises equal access to educational opportunities for students with disabilities in virtual charter schools.
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States seek to calm districts' Common Core jitters
Education Week
State education leaders are moving to calm political tempests over the Common Core State Standards by adopting or reaffirming policies aimed at asserting local control over data, curriculum, and materials. But the classroom-level impact of those moves could be negligible as states forge ahead on Common Core implementation. On the one hand, officials' actions in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana and Michigan highlight anxieties over the privacy of information about individual students and what some see as state and federal intrusion into classrooms. At the same time, the specific steps, all in states run by Republicans, largely emphasize existing policy or practice.
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The most important lesson schools can teach kids about reading: It's fun
The Atlantic
In a 2005 speech to the American Library Association, then-senator Obama described his view of the importance of literacy: "In this new economy, teaching our kids just enough so that they can get through Dick and Jane isn't going to cut it," he said. "The kind of literacy necessary for 21st-century employment requires detailed understanding and complex comprehension."
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Is the Common Core unfair to special needs students?
EdTech Magazine
The Common Core State Standards Initiative has weathered its fair share of criticism on its way to adoption in 45 states, the District of Columbia and four U.S. territories. Critics have argued that the initiative, which aims to raise student achievement through a national set of academic standards, has been poorly implemented, unfairly labels teachers as ineffective in the event of poor standardized test scores, and forces students to think too narrowly about the lessons and problems they set out to solve, among other potential deficiencies.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities (Education Week)
Imagery: A key to understanding math (MindShift)
The mind of a middle schooler: How brains learn (Edutopia)
What will Common Core assessments cost states? (eSchool News)
Bullying interventions increase bullying (or do they?) (Psychology Today)

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Located in the heart of southern New England, at the mouth of the Thames River and entrance to Long Island Sound, Mitchell College is set on 68 acres in a safe residential neighborhood in the city of New London, Connecticut. Once a private estate, the campus is laid out across bluffs that slope to the water’s edge, with rolling lawns and wooded walkways, sandy beaches, towering shade trees and indigenous landscaped gardens
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Summit View, a WASC-accredited school and college preparatory program, offers comprehensive elementary, middle, and secondary school programs for students with learning differences. An innovative and integrated curriculum utilizing the latest technology, small class sizes, and high teacher to student ratio enables students to experience academic success.
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Learn skills for success in college, employment and independent living for young adults on the Autism Spectrum and with Learning Differences. CIP’s personalized support programs provide one of the most comprehensive programs in the world.

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Ready to learn? The key is listening with intention
MindShift
Listening and observing can be passive activities — in one ear and out the other, as our mothers used to say. Or they can be rich, active, intense experiences that lead to serious learning. The difference lies in our intention: the purpose and awareness with which we approach the occasion. Here's how to make sure your intentions are good. Research on how we learn a second language demonstrates that effective listening involves more than simply hearing the words that float past our ears. Rather, it's an active process of interpreting information and making meaning. Studies of skilled language learners have identified specific listening strategies that lead to superior comprehension.
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Learning to type before learning to write?
Psychology Today (commentary)
One of the most important and simplest lessons in preschool and Kindergarten are the ABCs. At an early age, children learn to recognize the letters, then to print them, in both lowercase and uppercase. If this was 1960, the children would then progress to cursive writing. If cursive writing is disappearing from the public school curriculum, what is next to go? In the next decade, will children learn to type more proficiently than they learn to handwrite?
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Dyslexia: The latest in education and research
WOSU-TV
Iamgnei tyirng to raed lkei tihs. For the 40,000 Americans with dyslexia, letters look like numbers, words shift around the page and reading means decoding gibberish. This hour we'll learn about dyslexia's auditory roots and what new research means for future diagnosis and treatment. We'll also talk about helping dyslexic kids stay confident and foster a love of learning.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword EDUCATION.


Educational video games help students with math skills
Science World News
Though video games can often be a distraction from chores or school work, a recent study shows how they can also be a motivator help enhance children's math learning skills. According to researchers at New York University and the City University of New York, they found that by playing a math video game either competitively or collaboratively with another student, participants were able to adjust their mindset into learning more about numbers and equations.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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States seek to calm districts' Common Core jitters
Education Week
State education leaders are moving to calm political tempests over the Common Core State Standards by adopting or reaffirming policies aimed at asserting local control over data, curriculum, and materials.

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Study: MRI might allow earlier diagnosis of dyslexia
HealthDay News
Brain scans may help diagnose people with the common reading disorder dyslexia, a new study reveals. MRI scans in 40 kindergarten children revealed a link between poor pre-reading skills and the size of a structure that connects two language-processing areas in the brain, the researchers said.

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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US 'report card' for 2013: Student achievement creeps upward
The Christian Science Monitor
America's students continue to make incremental improvements in math in fourth and eighth grades, and in eighth-grade reading. But schools and educators have made little progress on closing gaps in student performance by race — even over a two-decade period — and the gains that have been made are small ones. That's the verdict from the latest data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, otherwise known as the "nation's report card," which regularly measures students' performance on a variety of subjects.
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Students with disabilities vulnerable to bullying
New Haven Register
Students with disabilities are more frequently the targets of bullies, according to education experts. Children identified as having special needs are three to five times more at risk for being the targets of bullies than other children, according to the state Department of Education’s web site. "Often, it takes shape in a way that presents the least resistance to being held accountable, and often occurs when adults are not paying attention," department spokeswoman Kelly Donnelly said. "Bullying often occurs when an aggressor is presented with the opportunity to tease, taunt, threaten, exclude, or even cause physical harm and there is a low likelihood of being caught in the act."
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ADHD is overdiagnosed, leading to needless and harmful treatment, researchers say
MinnPost
Widening the definition of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder has led to an overdiagnosis of the condition, causing many people, especially children, to receive needless and potentially harmful medical treatment, according to a research analysis published in the British Medical Journal. The expansion of the definition of the disorder also threatens to create a skepticism about ADHD diagnoses that may harm people who have severe cases and "who unquestionably need sensitive, skilled specialist help and support," warn the Australian and Dutch authors of the analysis.
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New less restrictive lice policies at some schools leave parents scratching their heads
The Associated Press via The Washington Post
Some schools are letting kids with live lice in their hair back in the classroom, a less restrictive policy that has parents scratching their heads. "Lice is icky, but it's not dangerous," says Deborah Pontius, the school nurse for the Pershing County School District in Lovelock, Nev. "It's not infectious, and it's fairly easy to treat." Previously, most schools have required children with lice to be sent home, in an attempt to prevent the spread to other children. Children haven't been allowed to return to the classroom until all the lice and nits, or lice eggs, are removed.
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