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A Different Approach Makes All The Difference

Educating children with Language Learning Disabilities and Learning Differences

 


 Top Stories

Obama administration issues No Child Left Behind waiver renewal guidance
The Huffington Post
The Obama administration is inviting states to apply to renew their waivers from the No Child Left Behind Act. And according to a guidance issued, these renewed waivers could last all the way through the 2018-2019 school year — locking down some of President Barack Obama's education policy changes well into the next presidency. The new guidelines don't radically change the criteria for escaping the law's strictures. According to an Education Department document, states will have to ensure that schools cannot receive top ratings for accountability if they are not closing "significant achievement or graduation rate gaps" between different groups of students.
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Collecting IEP goal data: Students, teachers working in partnership
By: Pamela Hill
At the conclusion of an initial or annual IEP review, after everyone has shared information about the student and developed the best IEP plan for the student's success, everyone breathes a sigh of relief. The "save" button on the computer IEP program is pressed, and voila! The educational goals become active. These active goals become the crux for the student's special education instruction. The data collection for the goals begins almost simultaneously, as the data collection is evidence for how well the student is progressing toward meeting the educational goals.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword IEP.


10 lessons learned from the assessment field tests
THE Journal
According to Chief Technology Officer Brandt Redd, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium saw "significantly" fewer problems than it had expected during its spring 2014 field tests. "Things went more smoothly than our expectations," said Redd. "We didn't have any systemwide issues; issues that happened tended to be isolated." That lack of major issues was in large part due to the efforts of educators all over the country who put in the time to make sure everything would work before nearly 5 million students showed up to take the field tests — whether for Smarter Balanced, PARCC or one of the alternative state online initiatives.
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Looking to share your expertise?
In an effort to enhance the overall content of THE LD SOURCE, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of LDA and/or reader of THE LD SOURCE, your knowledge of learning disabilities and related issues lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit. Our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.


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 In the News


States expanded availability and uses of student K-12 data, new report says
Education Week
The number of states that provide data to parents allowing them to track their children's academic progress has more than doubled in the last three years from eight to 17, while more than 100 bills designed to better safeguard student data were considered in states, according to a recent report from the Washington-based Data Quality Campaign. The "Data for Action 2014" report from the group, which advocates for the availability and use of student data to improve K-12 achievement was released Nov. 19, 2014.
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Multi-state K-12 collaborative seeks proposals for OER
eSchool News
The K–12 OER Collaborative, an initiative led by a group of 11 states with the goal of creating comprehensive, high-quality, open educational resources, is releasing a Request for Proposals to create open educational resources supporting K–12 mathematics and English language arts. The resources will be designed to enable all students to master foundational skills and knowledge to achieve college and career readiness.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Student-Paced, Mastery-Based Math

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Focus on play in kindergarten may improve grades
Reuters
Training teachers to promote structured play among kindergarteners yields improved reading, vocabulary and math scores that persist into first grade, according to a new study. The technique, called "Tools for the Mind," seemed to be particularly effective in high-poverty schools, the authors write. "The active ingredient is children are taking responsibility for their own learning," said Clancy Blair of the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development at New York University, who led the study.
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How poorly designed classroom space puts student learning at risk
The Hechinger Report
Space matters. For over 200 years we have been teaching in row-by-column seating. Many experts argue that this classroom style has conditioned both educators and students to ineffectively utilize space. Researchers have said that space affects human behavior in powerful ways. So it is striking to realize that in education, empirical research on space is largely underutilized.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Schools try shuffling schedules for success (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
Growing up with ADHD (TIME)
Study: Nagging parents to help their kids learn to read works (Vox)
Approach to fractions seen as key shift in Common Core Standards (Education Week)
New NCLB waiver guidance from Department of Education (U.S. News & World Report)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



How to reframe the education reform debate
The Washington Post
Education policymakers have successfully framed the language of modern school reform to reflect specific values — “accountability,” for example, means standardized test-based accountability, and “no excuses” means that teachers are to blame if students don’t do well. The author of the following post argues that to move past this limiting reform model supporters of public education will have to reframe the debate with language that infuses their own values of shared responsibility and empathy.
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Are schools in New Orleans failing students with disabilities?
NPR
In New Orleans, schools have long struggled to provide for students with physical, emotional and mental disabilities. Even before Hurricane Katrina, many parents had to fight for extra help. But many say things have only gotten harder since the city's public school district shifted almost entirely to charter schools. Crystal Walker is a 34-year-old single mother of two boys, ages 7 and 9, and a 12-year-old daughter. All three attend Akili Academy charter school in New Orleans, and all have been diagnosed with various physical, emotional and learning disabilities, including ADHD and dyslexia. Walker describes her struggle to secure appropriate services for her children.
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THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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