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More than 1 in 10 kids diagnosed with ADHD
Disability Scoop
The number of American children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is on the rise, according to new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 1 in 10 kids ages 4 to 17 has been diagnosed with ADHD and an increasing number of them are taking medication to address their symptoms, the CDC said. The findings released Friday come from a survey of over 95,000 parents, which was conducted in 2011. The agency found that about 11 percent of kids — or roughly 6.4 million — had been given a diagnosis of ADHD, which is characterized by difficulty paying attention or controlling impulsive behaviors.
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Which states are most vulnerable to K-12 sequester cuts?
Education Week
Sequestration — those 5 percent across-the-board cuts that hit school districts this year and are slated to be in place for a decade — has affected some districts and states harder than others. Part of the reason? Some states are much more dependent on federal funding than others. So which states are the most vulnerable to federal cuts? The American Association of School Administrators took a look at that in a report.
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Shedding new light on learning disorders
Michigan State University
A Michigan State University researcher has discovered the first anatomical evidence that the brains of children with a nonverbal learning disability — long considered a "pseudo" diagnosis — may develop differently than the brains of other children. The finding, published in Child Neuropsychology, could ultimately help educators and clinicians better distinguish between — and treat — children with a nonverbal learning disability, or NVLD, and those with Asperger's, or high functioning autism, which is often confused with NVLD.
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 In the News


Carbon monoxide detectors in schools: Only 2 states require them
Deseret News
Connecticut and Maryland are the only states that require carbon monoxide detectors in schools, and most U.S. schools don't have them, the Associated Press reported, soon after 44 students and adults were sickened by CO fumes at Utah's Montezuma Creek Elementary School on Nov. 18. The Utah event is only the latest in a string of similar incidents at U.S. schools. Last December, 49 people were treated for CO poisoning after exposure at an Atlanta elementary school.
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Is it better to have a great teacher or a small class?
The Atlantic
When it comes to student success, "smaller is better" has been the conventional wisdom on class size, despite a less-than-persuasive body of research. But what if that concept were turned on its head, with more students per classroom — provided they're being taught by the most effective teachers? That's the question a new study out today from the conservative Thomas B. Fordham Institute set out to answer, using data on teachers and students in North Carolina in grades 4 through 8 over four academic years. While the results are based on a theoretical simulation rather than actually reconfiguring classroom assignments in order to measure the academic outcomes, the findings are worth considering.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    New website offers Common Core lesson plans for special educators (Education Week)
Lower expectations for students with disabilities? (eSchool News)
Getting kids to read: The 5 key habits of lifelong readers (The Washington Post)
Cursive handwriting: 7 states fight for cursive writing in school (The Associated Press via The Christian Science Monitor)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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Located in the heart of southern New England, at the mouth of the Thames River and entrance to Long Island Sound, Mitchell College is set on 68 acres in a safe residential neighborhood in the city of New London, Connecticut. Once a private estate, the campus is laid out across bluffs that slope to the water’s edge, with rolling lawns and wooded walkways, sandy beaches, towering shade trees and indigenous landscaped gardens
Where Students
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Summit View, a WASC-accredited school and college preparatory program, offers comprehensive elementary, middle, and secondary school programs for students with learning differences. An innovative and integrated curriculum utilizing the latest technology, small class sizes, and high teacher to student ratio enables students to experience academic success.
For information, visit www.summitview.org.
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3 strategies to promote independent thinking in classrooms
Edutopia
Imagine the intentional focus you would bring to crossing a rushing creek. Each stepping-stone is different in shape, each distance uneven and unpredictable, requiring you to tread with all senses intact. The simple act of traversing water on stones is an extraordinary exercise in concentration. Now think of how, with all the tweeting, texting and messaging that technology has given us, our attention is frittered away by the mundane. The speed of communication undermines the continuum of thought. That rushing creek is much harder to cross.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CLASSROOMS.


Science says: Here's how to reach every student brain
eSchool News
By now, most educators know that classroom practices such as differentiating instruction, critical thinking and making the environment less stressful for students are critical to a 21st century education. But ... why does it work? One education and brain expert says it all comes down to chemicals and neurons. Dr. Sarah Armstrong, the senior director for statewide K-12 professional development at the University of Virginia and a former elementary school principal and assistant superintendent of curriculum, said she became a "brain junkie" in the 1980s and never looked back.
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Seclusion rooms used 23,000 times in Connecticut schools
WVIT-TV
"[They] used to lock me up in that room all the time and I used to jump on there," recalled nine-year-old Robert Eldred. Robert's experience with seclusion, or "scream," rooms started when he was a kindergartner. His parents said Robert was forced into the rooms nearly every day. Seclusion rooms come in many shapes and sizes. Some have windows or padding. Typically, children are placed in the rooms alone and are not allowed to leave until an adult allows them to do so. Often, the rooms are small in size.
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ADHD study: Expensive training programs don't help kids' grades, behavior
Medical Xpress
Many parents spend thousands of dollars on computer-based training programs that claim to help children with ADHD succeed in the classroom and in peer relationships while reducing hyperactivity and inattentiveness. But a University of Central Florida researcher says parents are better off saving their hard-earned cash. Psychology professor Mark Rapport's research team spent two years analyzing the data from 25 studies and found that those programs are not producing significant or clinically meaningful long-term improvements in children's cognitive abilities, academic performance or behavior.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Which states are most vulnerable to K-12 sequester cuts?
Education Week
Sequestration — those 5 percent across-the-board cuts that hit school districts this year and are slated to be in place for a decade — has affected some districts and states harder than others. Part of the reason?

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Study: MRI might allow earlier diagnosis of dyslexia
HealthDay News
Brain scans may help diagnose people with the common reading disorder dyslexia, a new study reveals. MRI scans in 40 kindergarten children revealed a link between poor pre-reading skills and the size of a structure that connects two language-processing areas in the brain, the researchers said.

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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Schools create social opportunities for disabled kids
Orlando Sentinel
Nolan Lang, a baseball player at Dr. Phillips High, wrapped the hands of fellow student Cameron Meena into his own. Together, they swung the bat. "Run, Cameron!" said Nolan, a 17-year-old senior, as the ball sailed off the tee. "Let's go!" Keeping his hand on Cameron's shoulder, Nolan led Cameron around the bases. Nolan and Cameron, who has autism, are part of a movement in Central Florida and elsewhere to create more social opportunities for disabled students to interact with their nondisabled peers.
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More states are collecting and using student data to improve education
U.S. News & World Report
More now than ever, states are expanding the ways they use student data to inform how they make changes to and improve their education systems, according to a report from the Data Quality Campaign. The Washington-based nonprofit measures states by a list of 10 benchmarks that show how effectively they use different data measures, such as linking K-12 and higher education data and creating progress reports with student-level data for teachers, students and parents. The group found that in 2013, Arkansas and Delaware were the first two states to meet all 10 benchmarks.
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Teens' mental disorders often untreated in US, study finds
HealthDay News
Less than half of American teens with mental health disorders receive treatment, and those who do get help rarely see a mental health specialist, a new study indicates. The findings underscore the need for better mental health services for teens, said study author E. Jane Costello, associate director of the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy in Durham, N.C.
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Early testing reveals high toxic chemical levels at Malibu, Calif., high school
Los Angeles Times
Preliminary testing at Malibu, Calif., high school has uncovered toxic chemicals at levels that exceed regulatory limits, according to a statement released Friday by the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District. The findings trigger what could be a "very large, very expensive" remediation plan in which the district will have to conduct additional testing and ultimately clean up the chemicals, district Supt. Sandra Lyon said. That potentially years-long process will be overseen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, she added.
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