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Researchers explore links between learning disorders in children
Medical News Today
New interdisciplinary research from Western University has uncovered fundamental links among three major learning difficulties in some school-age children. Although many children have specific problems with dyslexia, specific language impairment and dyscalculia, this study is the first to show a significant portion of these children have overlapping deficits. Importantly, the research team has also devised a 10-minute screening test that could be administered broadly in primary schools to identify children at risk for the different disorders.
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Common Core academic standards force teachers to work on critical thinking over memorization
The Associated Press via Fox News
Remembering the plot of a short story is no longer good enough in teacher Amy Lawson's fifth-grade classroom. Today's students are being asked to think more critically. For example, what might a character say in an email to a friend? "It's hard. But you can handle this," Lawson tells them. Welcome to a classroom using the Common Core State Standards, one of the most politicized and misunderstood changes in education for students and their teachers in kindergarten through high school.
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Survey: Districts heavily focused on new tests, materials, for Common Core
Education Week
A new survey by an education marketing organization finds that school districts are making a top priority of shifting materials, instruction and assessments to reflect the Common Core State Standards. That's not too surprising, of course, given that all but four states have adopted the standards. But it offers yet another thermometer of sorts to measure the level of attention and activity around the new standards.
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 In the News


Recognizing the signs of dyslexia
Leader-Post
Children begin learning to read early in their education. Very often, some children seem to excel at reading and writing, while others may struggle. The obstacles kids struggle with may disappear as they age and grow more accustomed to reading, but no such relief comes for kids struggling with dyslexia. The Mayo Clinic defines dyslexia as a learning disorder characterized by difficulty reading. It is a common condition and does not mean a child has subpar vision or intelligence. Dyslexia often goes undiagnosed, and many kids reach adulthood before realizing they are dyslexic. According to Dyslexia Health, 70 to 80 percent of people with poor reading skills are likely to be dyslexic, and dyslexia is the most common cause of difficulties with reading, spelling and writing.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.


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How an iPad can overcome 'print disabled' curriculum
eSchool News
One of the signature findings of the cognitive revolution of mind, brain and education research over the last few decades has been the overwhelming recognition of the tremendous diversity of human brains. In our population of students, there is a stunning variety of talents and capacities, and some of our peculiarities are both great strengths and weaknesses. For instance, an incredibly high proportion of the world's leading astrophysicists are dyslexic. As it turns out, in the complex architecture of the brain-eye connection, some of us have very strong central vision, while others have very strong peripheral vision.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    More than 1 in 10 kids diagnosed with ADHD (Disability Scoop)
Shedding new light on learning disorders (Michigan State University)
Is it better to have a great teacher or a small class? (The Atlantic)
Which states are most vulnerable to K-12 sequester cuts? (Education Week)
Science says: Here's how to reach every student brain (eSchool News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


12 NCLB-waiver states want extra year for full teacher-evaluation rollout
Education Week
A dozen states have applied for extra flexibility from the U.S. Department of Education to give them another year of wiggle room as they roll out new teacher-evaluation systems. And 15 states have asked federal officials for a special waiver so they can give fewer tests to students, the department announced. States including Maryland, Kentucky, and North Carolina want to delay, by one year, tying teacher evaluations to teacher personnel decisions. That's something federal officials offered back in June as states struggled to implement new common standards, new tests, and high-stakes teacher-rating systems that tie personnel decisions to student growth.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
How an iPad can overcome 'print disabled' curriculum
eSchool News
One of the signature findings of the cognitive revolution of mind, brain and education research over the last few decades has been the overwhelming recognition of the tremendous diversity of human brains.

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Study: MRI might allow earlier diagnosis of dyslexia
HealthDay News
Brain scans may help diagnose people with the common reading disorder dyslexia, a new study reveals. MRI scans in 40 kindergarten children revealed a link between poor pre-reading skills and the size of a structure that connects two language-processing areas in the brain, the researchers said.

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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Longtime special education resource to be reborn as part of new center
Education Week
Resources created by the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities — widely known by the acronym NICHCY, a holdover from the name it had over 30 years ago — will remain available online, though the center closed down after its last grant from the Department of Education's office of special education programs ended in September. The center, once known as the National Information Center for Handicapped Children and Youth, had for decades provided direct resources to parents through mail and a telephone hotline.
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Cards let schools, parents keep eye on their student
USA Today
When fourth-grader Abby Ahrens boards her school bus in this Cincinnati suburb, she thrusts out a white card as she passes a small computer screen next to the bus doors. It beeps, and the monitor lights up briefly. Her mother gets a text message saying her daughter has made it onto the bus. The same thing happens when Abby gets off the bus at Dater Montessori School in Cincinnati, so Mom knows that Abby has arrived safely. The ZPass program, a partnership between Cincinnati Public Schools and First Student bus company, is billed as a tool to inform parents and improve ridership data. But it's also one way schools are trying to keep tabs of their students — often to track attendance.
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Redefining the writing process with iPads
Edutopia
Take a moment to think about how you learned to write. What steps did you go through? What was your process? Most of us learned the same core set of skills on paper: organize, draft, edit, revise, turn in. Our teachers then marked up what we had handwritten or typed, and returned our writing. From there, maybe it ended up tacked to a bulletin board, stuck on the refrigerator door, stuffed into a notebook or tossed in the nearest trash can.
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