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 Top Stories

Resources for writing IEPs aligned to Common Core State Standards
Education Week
Christina Samuels, a contributor for Education Week, writes: "A few weeks ago, I hosted a chat on writing standards-based individualized education program goals aligned to common core reading and math standards. The guests, Barbara Van Haren and Carol Kosnitsky, did a great job answering questions from our audience, but one inquiry that came up over and over was from educators looking for clear examples of just what a standards-based IEP goal would look like. In the context of an hour-long webchat, we weren't able to link to all the information out there on this topic. I've gathered some resources from educators and my own research for this blog post, with an eye out to resources that offer as many examples as possible."
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ADHD is a life-long condition, say experts, and long-term effects of meds are uncertain
The Washington Post
People who had ADHD diagnosed in childhood will probably have it into their adult years. About 11 percent of U.S. children age 3 to 17 have ADHD, according to 2011 figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among such people, almost 30 percent will have symptoms that meet the full ADHD diagnosis beyond childhood, according to a 2013 study, and another third will continue to have some persisting symptoms and impairment. "We tend to think that ADHD is a lifetime condition," said psychiatrist J. J. Sandra Kooij of the Netherlands. "You don't outgrow it." ADHD adults married to spouses who share organizational duties tend to cope well, as do those who find careers that avoid the hurdles imposed by desk jobs, Kooij said.
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Disability advocates 'encouraged' by budget deal
Disability Scoop
A congressional budget deal announced this week that would ease many of the spending cuts set to hit special education and other disability programs is a step in the right direction, advocates say. The bipartisan agreement would mitigate the across-the-board cuts that took effect earlier this year under a process known as sequestration. And, if approved, disability advocates say the deal would bring at least some relief to everything from special education to housing, supported employment services, research and other federally-funded programs benefitting people with disabilities. "We are very encouraged," said Kim Hymes senior director of policy and advocacy at the Council for Exceptional Children, which lobbies on behalf of special educators.
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 In the News


Are NCLB waiver states intervening in the right schools?
Education Week
In Nevada during the 2011-2012 school year, 86 schools were in "restructuring" under the No Child Left Behind Act — the most aggressive sanction under the federal school accountability law. But after the state got an NCLB waiver, by the 2012-2013 school year, 75 of those schools got relief from the toughest interventions. These are schools that hadn't made adequate yearly progress for six years in a row. For half of the worst NCLB-era schools in 15 states, waivers proved to be an escape hatch, according to a new paper released today from New America Foundation policy analyst Anne Hyslop, who has delivered some of the most comprehensive research yet on the implications of new NCLB waivers.
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Is learning 'visible' to students?
Education Week
Waiting for the next assignment or task, while not knowing what it may be, is very difficult for students. Yet, in some (perhaps...many) classrooms too many students wait at their desks for the next sheet of paper or the next assignment to come their way. Their learning needs take a back seat to the script the teacher is required to stick to ... and in some cases, the teacher holds all of the content.
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Learning science concepts using the iPad
The Boston Globe
Technology is often seen as a powerful way to improve education, but just handing out the latest gadgets won't by itself improve how children learn. That's something educators and administrators are wrestling with, as schools experiment with rolling out iPads and tablets. Enter Matthew Schneps, a researcher at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who studies dyslexia and has long been intrigued by technology's potential to help people with this learning disability, who often struggle in an education system dominated by the textbook. The discoveries he has been making about how people with dyslexia analyze blurry images and read faster on hand-held devices led him to wonder about what kinds of non-text-based learning might be enabled by technology.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DYSLEXIA.


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Dyslexia linked to brain communication breakdown (Scientific American)
Age of distraction: Why it's crucial for students to learn to focus (MindShift)
How to get students to love reading (Edudemic)
Inclusion on 'Nation's Report Card' goes up, but achievement gaps stay wide (Education Week)
Special educators strained by budget cuts (Disability Scoop)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Should gifted students get more resources?
The New York Times
In a country that has always been a little uncomfortable with the idea of an educational elite, it's tough to argue for more services for gifted students in public schools, particularly when so many districts are already starved for resources and high-quality programs. But that's what we did on Sunday in the third installment of our editorial series on fixing math and science education, and the touchy subject produced a particularly fervent response.
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Disability advocates 'encouraged' by budget deal
Disability Scoop
A congressional budget deal announced this week that would ease many of the spending cuts set to hit special education and other disability programs is a step in the right direction, advocates say.

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Common Core's promise collides with IEP realities
Education Week
One of the most promising elements of common academic standards for students with disabilities, say experts in special education, is that they offer explicit connections from one set of skills to another.

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Study: MRI might allow earlier diagnosis of dyslexia
HealthDay News
Brain scans may help diagnose people with the common reading disorder dyslexia, a new study reveals. MRI scans in 40 kindergarten children revealed a link between poor pre-reading skills and the size of a structure that connects two language-processing areas in the brain, the researchers said.

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The role of PBL in making the shift to Common Core
Edutopia
The Common Core has embedded within it some Big Ideas that shift the role of teachers to curriculum designers and managers of an inquiry process. How can project-based learning help with this shift?
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Republicans back away from Common Core as legislative roadblocks advance
The Washington Post
Even as international studies show American students falling farther behind Asian and European students in math, science and reading scores, a group of Republican governors, mostly in Southern states, are distancing themselves from a set of education standards that most of their colleagues are embracing. The governors find themselves under pressure from opponents of Common Core standards. Those opponents, largely made up of conservative activists, say the standards are a federal power grab aimed at dictating state education policy, which should be the domain of the states.
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Panel recommends new breed of assessments for science learning
Education Week
Laying out a new vision for science assessments, a panel of the National Research Council proposed that states design testing systems that integrate several key types of science learning, and blend classroom-based assessments with state-level "monitoring" tests and gauges of students' "opportunity to learn." The proposal, detailed in a 256-page report, offers an expert panel's ideas on how testing should change to fully reflect the Next Generation Science Standards adopted by eight states so far. The picture it paints departs markedly from current assessment practice, which tilts heavily toward students' knowledge of science facts, and typically takes place in one large-scale statewide exam each spring.
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5 ways to keep children safe from school shootings
Psychology Today
The shooting at the Arapahoe High School in Colorado, coming on the day before the one-year anniversary of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., reminds us that it's always a good time to have a serious conversation with your kids about school safety. These events, while rare, are growing in number, according to research just released by the FBI.
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