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As 2012 comes to a close, LDA would like to wish its members, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of The LD Source, a look at the most accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume next Thursday, Jan. 3.

Study: Inclusion may not be best after all
Disability Scoop    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Nov. 8, 2012: Inclusion is often believed to be the best option for students with disabilities, but a new study calls into question whether or not the practice truly leads to better outcomes long term. Researchers found that students with autism who spent 75 to 100 percent of their time in general education classrooms were no more likely to complete high school, go to college or see improvements in cognitive functioning than those who spent more time in segregated environments. More

Technology Meets Tranquility at The Storm King School
With a campus rich in technology support for all students, including those in a program for bright college-bound students with learning differences, The Storm King School offers a welcome sense of balance. Teachers use a 6,000-acre forest classroom adjacent to campus for environmental science labs, experiential lessons, and art in the spirit of the Hudson River School painters. For more information, go to http://www.sks.org/academics/Mountain_Center.cfm


The upside of dyslexia
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Feb. 9, 2012: The word "dyslexia" evokes painful struggles with reading, and indeed this learning disability causes much difficulty for the estimated 15 percent of Americans affected by it. Since the phenomenon of "word blindness" was first documented more than a century ago, scientists have searched for the causes of dyslexia, and for therapies to treat it. In recent years, however, dyslexia research has taken a surprising turn: identifying the ways in which people with dyslexia have skills that are superior to those of typical readers. The latest findings on dyslexia are leading to a new way of looking at the condition: not just as an impediment, but as an advantage, especially in certain artistic and scientific fields. More

Listen up: Abnormality in auditory processing underlies dyslexia
Medical News Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Jan. 5, 2012: People with dyslexia often struggle with the ability to accurately decode and identify what they read. Although disrupted processing of speech sounds has been implicated in the underlying pathology of dyslexia, the basis of this disruption and how it interferes with reading comprehension has not been fully explained. Now, new research published by Cell Press in the Dec. 22 issue of the journal Neuron finds that a specific abnormality in the processing of auditory signals accounts for the main symptoms of dyslexia. More

Help High Schoolers with ADHD

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More states freed from No Child Left Behind law
The Associated Press via U.S. News & World Report    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
July 12, 2012: Although more than half the states are now exempt from the toughest requirements of the federal "No Child Left Behind" education law, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said his goal remains to help Congress fix the law, not to sidestep the stalled overhaul effort. More



Use of seclusion rooms upheld
Disability Scoop    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Sept. 27, 2012: Federal education officials are standing behind a North Carolina school's right to confine students with disabilities in seclusion rooms. In a complaint to the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights earlier this year, a North Carolina family argued that their 5-year-old's civil rights were violated when he was placed in a seclusion room at school. The family — who wished to remain anonymous — said the rooms were only being used for special education students, making them "discriminatory." But in concluding their investigation in late August, the Education Department found that the school district acted in compliance with regulations. More


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Study suggests long-term ADHD drug use appears safe
PsychCentral    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
July 26, 2012: Drugs used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder do not appear to have long-term effects on the brain, according to new research done with monkeys. Between 5 to 7 percent of elementary school children are diagnosed with ADHD, according to researchers from the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in North Carolina who undertook the new study. More

Need help with struggling readers and writers?

The MediaLexie Scribe 2012 is a unique, free-floating toolbar designed to support individuals in reading and written language activities. With text-to-speech, speech-to-text, word prediction, note-taking, and phonetic transcription tools, the MediaLexie Scribe 2012 allows students to access and use core content independently. MORE


Early brain changes may indicate dyslexia
ABC News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Jan. 26, 2012: A group of researchers say they may be close to finding a way to resolve what's known as the "dyslexia paradox": the fact that the earlier a child is diagnosed with dyslexia, the easier it is to treat, but because the disorder is characterized by difficulty in reading and speaking, it is not typically diagnosed until a child reaches third grade, which many experts consider to be late. More

New free font available to help those with dyslexia
Medical Xpress    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Oct. 4, 2012: A new font tailored for people afflicted with dyslexia is now available for use on mobile devices, thanks to a design by Abelardo Gonzalez, a mobile app designer from New Hampshire. Gonzalez, in collaboration with educators, has selected a font that many people with dyslexia find easier to read. Even better, the new font is free and has already been made available for some word processors and e-book readers. The font, called OpenDyslexic, has also been added to the font choices used by Instapaper — a program that allows users to copy a Web page and save it to their hard drive. More


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To find out how to feature your company in the LDA eNewsletter and other advertising opportunities, Contact James DeBois at 469-420-2618.
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Youngest kids in class may be more likely to get ADHD diagnosis
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Nov. 21, 2012: A new study from Iceland adds to existing evidence that kids are more likely to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder if they're among the youngest in their grade at school. The findings suggest — but don't prove — that some children are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder when they're just less mature than their peers. More

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Study: Signs of dyslexia start before reading
ABC News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
April 12, 2012: Signs of dyslexia may begin even before a child tries to read, according to new research published in the journal Current Biology. Dyslexia, a developmental reading disorder that occurs when the brain does not properly recognize and process certain symbols, cannot just be considered a language problem anymore, as it affects comprehension and visual understanding of symbols and patterns, said Andrea Facoetti, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Padova and co-author of the study. It has been widely "accepted that reading disorders arise from a spoken language problem, [but] results demonstrate the critical role played by visual attention in learning to read." More
 
THE LD SOURCE

LDA does not recommend or endorse any one specific diagnostic or therapeutic regime, whether it is educational, psychological or medical. The viewpoints expressed in THE LD SOURCE are those of the authors and advertisers.

Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Sasser, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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