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Fixing the gender gap in nursing pay
By Keith Carlson
According to the Institute for Women's Policy Research, full-time female workers earned 78 cents on the dollar as compared to their male counterparts in 2013. So-called "pay parity" has long been on the minds of many stakeholders, but the rate of change in this regard has been woefully slow. Recently, a study published by the American Medical Association elucidated that men working as nurses earn considerably more than female nurses, even though men make up only 9 percent of the nursing workforce.
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ANA MASSACHUSETTS NEWS & UPDATES


Register now for these Spring events!
Massachusetts Health Council's 5th Women's Health Forum Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy: Knowledge is Everything
April 16, 2015
Westin Copley Place, Boston
MHC Women's Health Conference Registration
Forum Flyer, click here.

2015 Annual Spring Symposium - Continuing Nursing Education: Boot Camp
Friday, May 1, 2015
8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Symposium Flyer, click here.
Registration, click here.
$199 includes lunch
Wellesley Gateway Building, Wellesley, MA

American Nurses Association Massachusetts will be celebrating Nationa Nurses Day at Fenway Park!
Red Sox vs. Tampa Bay
Wednesday, May 6, 2015
7:10 p.m. (game time)
Red-Sox Tickets: $25 each
Be sure to join us at the pre-game Networking event from 5 - 6:30 p.m. at the Cask & Flagon
Networking Event: $25, ANA Massachusetts member rate, $35 non-member rate, $15 student rate
Register today for the Networking event!
Please note that you do not need tickets to the game to attend the pre-game Networking event.

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UPDATE: Easier Nomination Process for Modern Healthcare's 100 Most Influential
Modern Healthcare is accepting nominations for its annual “100 Most Influential People in Healthcare” ranking. This prestigious honor salutes transformative leaders in health care. The nomination deadline is Friday, April 17.

** We are happy to report that the nomination process just got easier! Previously you had to provide brief statements to address 3 of 5 nomination criteria when completing the nomination form. Now, only the nominee’s name, title and organization are required to complete the process. And yes, you can still nominate more than one person, AND you can nominate a person multiple times!*** We encourage you to submit nominations for ANA President Pam Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, and ANA CEO Marla Weston, PhD, RN, FAAN.

Please submit your nomination here, and spread the word!

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  CNE by Nurses, for Nurses.

TxHealthSteps.com makes it easy to earn CNE online. Browse our list of 50+ courses and short tutorials that are perfect for CNE on the go.
 


Joint Alert from Division of Health Professions Licensure
In response to The National Transportation Safety Board safety study, Drug Use Trends in Aviation: Assessing the Risk of Pilot Impairment the Board of Registration in Dentistry, the Board of Registration in Nursing, Board of Registration in Pharmacy, and the Board of Registration of Physician Assistants, on behalf of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Division of Health Professions Licensure issued a joint alert regarding prescribing and dispensing controlled substances in November, 2014.
Click here to find an update to that original alert.

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Become an active member!
Join the ANA Massachusetts Technology Committee

The overall goal of the committee is to identify and implement technological upgrades for the organization. Are you an ANA Massachusetts member who is looking for a way to become more involved in the organization? Do you have an interest or skill/expertise in IT and/or Technology projects. If you are looking for new opportunities, then we are looking for you! Contact info@anamass.org for more information
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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


Recent trends in the nursing pipeline: US educated BSNs continue to increase
Health Affairs Blog
To become licensed as a registered nurse (RN), graduates of nursing programs must pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) administered by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN). Foreign RNs wanting to practice in the U.S. must also take and pass the NCLEX. Thus, the annual data on the number of NCLEX exam takers and passers is a good metric of the nursing pipeline that will impact the future supply of nurses.
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3 must-have skills for nurse leaders
FierceHealthcare
In an era of increased physician leadership due to factors such as changing reimbursement and delivery systems, both doctors and nurses have more influence on the broader workings of the healthcare industry than ever, but that will require a different range of skills, according to a Harvard Business Review column. Success at the leadership level requires three major skills, writes Sachin H. Jain, M.D., chief medical officer at CareMore Health System.
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American Nurses Association panel aims to prevent violence, bullying in healthcare facilities
Endo Nurse
The American Nurses Association (ANA) has convened a panel of experts to make recommendations on preventing and reducing workplace violence, bullying and incivility, behaviors identified by research as particular problems in healthcare settings. The 25-member Professional Issues Panel on Workplace Violence, Bullying and Incivility is developing a position statement and detailed guidance for registered nurses and employers addressing the dangerous and disruptive behaviors. The panel, which received recommendations from hundreds of nurses on an affiliated advisory committee, is submitting its draft report for public comment through April 30.
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Nurse-directed intervention eases heart disease, diabetes
McKnight's
Having primary care nurses promote physical activity could be effective enough to reduce heart disease and Type 2 diabetes risk among seniors, according to a British study. Led by Tess Harris, M.D., at St. George's University of London, researchers assigned 298 patients ages 60 to 75 to receive standard care or a physical activity intervention. In four visits, nurses provided a physical activity plan and asked participants to track activity with a pedometer and a diary.
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How patient simulators help prospective nurses
The Associated Pres via Crain's Chicago Business
Melissa Thompson lay in her hospital bed, eight months pregnant. Her blood pressure was skyrocketing, and she was complaining of headaches. A group of nurses entered the room, circling Thompson's bed, keeping her warm with blankets, taking her vitals, administering a catheter, reading her charts. Her mother stood by and asked the nurse many questions as Thompson constantly asked for updates on her unborn baby.
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Why nurses need Twitter
The Huffington Post (opinion)
As scientists, early and mid-career academics, practicing nurses, and educators, we don't have a lot of free time. But we wouldn't be any of these things, nor be proficient at them, if we didn't keep in touch with the communities that undergrid everything we do. Twitter turns out to be the most powerful tool we have to do this. We each joined Twitter because we found ourselves ranting in front of our computers, over some scientific misconstruction in the media. We wanted a place to put these thoughts. We didn't set out to gather followers, and we didn't set out to position ourselves as the authority on anything — not even #nursing. It seems that there are a lot of folks on Twitter doing the same.
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Advice on primary permanent nursing
McKnight's
With the complexity in resident acuity on the rise, the need for licensed professionals is essential. By placing the nurse back at the bedside in a holistic care approach it allows for identification of deviation from patient/resident baseline ensuring early intervention and prevention of acute exacerbation. The continuity of the care giver ensures predictability of routine allowing for the desired anticipation of individual patterns as they pertain to the activities of daily living and behavioral deviations.
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New guidelines would greatly boost number of young people on statins
HealthDay News
If all healthcare providers followed new cholesterol guidelines aimed at children, almost half a million Americans aged 17 to 21 would be prescribed a cholesterol-lowering statin drug, a new study predicts. In 2011, the U.S. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute issued new guidelines on reducing heart disease in adolescents and young adults. Those guidelines recommended that all people aged 17 to 21 get their blood levels of cholesterol checked, and statin treatment be initiated if cholesterol was at a certain level.
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Less than recommended physical activity may still lengthen life
Reuters
Staying active, even only slightly, confers major longevity benefits, researchers say. During many years of follow-up, people who did less than the minimum recommended amount of physical activity still had a considerable decrease in risk of death compared to people who did no activity at all, in a new analysis of six studies. Based on self-reports of physical activity, people who did less than the recommended minimum of activity were still 20 percent less likely to die during the studies than people who were not active at all.
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Study: Fewer US children getting melanoma
HealthDay News
The incidence of deadly melanoma skin cancer is falling among American children, a new study finds. Researchers led by Lisa Campbell, M.D., of Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, looked at national cancer registry data from 2000 to 2010. They found that the overall number of new melanoma cases among children fell 12 percent each year from 2004 to 2010.
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Staff infections: What to do when exposed in the ER
MedPage Today
As emergency healthcare professionals, we are exposed to patients with a host of different infections, and sometimes are required to take post-exposure prophylaxis to prevent infection. Here is a look at some of the risks we encounter and the more common testing and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) agents you might need to know, either for your own practice as a healthcare provider (HCP) or for board exams.
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Detecting diabetes in children before symptoms appear
Reuters
Healthcare professionals may be able to detect Type 1 diabetes in children before they exhibit any symptoms of the disease, new research from Sweden shows. Scientists taking part in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) project have discovered four markers, or autoantibodies, in the blood of the study's participants that make it possible to detect the disease earlier, meaning that treatment can also start earlier.
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Migraine drug may up risk of eating disorders in some teens
HealthDay News
A new report has linked a migraine medication to increased odds of eating disorders in some teens. The drug in question is called topiramate (Topamax). It's an established migraine drug for adults that was just approved for use in teens in 2014. Appetite reduction and weight loss are common side effects of the drug, according to the report authors. It's important to note that the report only showed an association between taking the drug and eating disorders; it did not prove the drug can actually cause an eating disorder.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Chaos theory helps nurses cope in the emergency room (FierceHealthcare)
CNOs remain uncertain about DNP-prepared nurses (HealthLeaders Media)
Emergency department burden of constipation in the US from 2006 to 2011 (American Journal of Gastroenterology)
FDA issues draft guidance on abuse-deterrent opioids (U.S. Food and Drug Administration)
Data is no less secure even as HIPAA enforcement is here (By Lindy Benton)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

ANA Massachusetts Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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