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Nurses: Overworked and understaffed on the front lines
Healthline
There are 2.7 million nurses in America, and a new survey of more than 3,300 of them found that nurses are stressed, overworked, underappreciated and underutilized. Of more than 3,300 nurses surveyed by the Vickie Milazzo Institute in Houston, 64 percent said they rarely get seven to eight hours of sleep per night, and 31 percent said they get enough sleep just two to three nights a week. And despite being in the health industry, 77 percent of nurses said they regularly do not eat well.
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MARN NEWS & UPDATES


Career Guides needed for ANA - Massachusetts (formerly MARN) Career Connections Program! New nurses need you!
ANA - Massachusetts (formerly MARN) is happy to announce that the new program to help senior nursing students and new graduates who anticipate entering their first professional nurse position is very popular! The aim of the Career Connections program is to match a novice nurse (the Seeker) with a professional nurse career guide. This is a great opportunity for nursing professionals to share their knowledge and experiences with novice nurses through this important transition to a professional position in nursing. Career Guides support and encourage the seeker throughout their transition as they enter professional practice. The role of the Career guide is to guide Seeker to:
  • Identify possible entry level positions
  • Critique cover letters and resumes
  • Provide coaching for interviews with nurse recruiters
  • Listen and support to novices’ questions and answer job-related concerns
Once matched, Career Guides and novice nurses arrange to meet at a mutually agreeable time. The connection is meant to end when novice nurses find their first position. To participate send name, position, snail mail address and phone number to Sabianca Delva at sabianca.delva@gmail.com

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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


Nurse firing highlights hazards of social media in hospitals
ABC News
One of the most dramatic scenes so far from the second season of ABC's New York Med had nothing to do with gunshot wounds or heart transplants. It came when emergency room nurse Katie Duke was fired for posting a photo to Instagram. The photo captured a messy but empty trauma room that had been used to treat a man hit by a New York City subway train. Duke posted the photo with the caption "#Man vs 6 train."
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Nurses play key role in vaccination success
Healthcare Traveler
Nurses are on the front line when it comes to battling the resurgence of diseases like pertussis and measles. Anti-vaccination movements and economic factors have both contributed to the reappearance of these and other preventable diseases, and experts say that nurses might be the best tool healthcare has to fight a problem of epidemic proportions.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Free CNE credits are just a click away.

We've made it easy to earn free CNE online by offering 24/7 access to more than 40 courses on pediatric and adolescent healthcare. We also offer several courses approved for the ethics credits you now need and our new, short, CNE-accredited video tutorials are perfect for watching on the go.
 


Nurse empowerment: We need a workforce that accepts nothing but excellence
Advance
Colleen Villamin, a clinical resource nurse, writes: "It has occurred to me recently that many nurses feel powerless to address daily issues that affect patient safety and nurse satisfaction. I often hear grumblings ranging from difficult nursing assistants who do not give baths to medical teams who do not address end of life issues until the time of an impending code. The phrase "that's the way it is" implies that nurses are powerless to change behaviors that negatively affect patients and drive nurses away from the bedside.
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Pediatric nurses use four habits model to prepare for emotionally difficult discussions
Medical News Today
A child's illness and hospitalization are extremely stressful for both the child and the parents. A new study reports that the Four Habits Model of Highly Effective Clinicians, a core set of communication skills developed to help physicians communicate with patients, can successfully prepare inexperienced nurses for emotionally difficult conversations with parents of pediatric patients.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
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Nurses and technology: Friends or foes?
EndoNurse
Nurses are constantly being asked to embrace new technology changes, often without being provide a full explanation to the benefits and impact to patient care. They comply, but can become frustrated and this can lead to job dissatisfaction or even burnout.

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Nurses learn to work through generational diversity
By Keith Carlson
There are four generations currently working within the nursing profession. Although this diversity can be seen as a positive aspect of our collective culture, it is easy to understand that there is also room for misunderstanding and mistrust between the generations.

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6 reasons why nurses are the unsung heroes of the ER
The Huffington Post
Nurses frequently go above and beyond the call of duty, while receiving little recognition for their amazing work and dedication. It is a situation we all should do our best to improve.

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Researchers show the danger of dormant viruses in the body
By: Dorothy L. Tengler
Sepsis is caused by many different types of microbes, including bacteria, fungi and viruses. This is a major challenge in the intensive care unit of hospitals, where it is one of the leading causes of death. Every year, severe sepsis strikes about 750,000 Americans. It's been estimated that between 28 percent and 50 percent of these people die — far more than the number of deaths in the United States from prostate cancer, breast cancer and AIDS combined. Now, a provocative new study links prolonged episodes of sepsis to the reactivation of otherwise dormant viruses in the body.
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Many women don't believe their breast cancer risk numbers
American Medical News
Telling patients how likely they are to develop breast cancer within the next five years might not be enough to ensure that women make informed decisions related to that risk, a recent study said. Nineteen percent of women who completed a breast cancer risk assessment survey didn't believe their calculated five-year risk. They also did not believe estimates on how much their cancer risk would be reduced by taking the chemoprevention drugs tamoxifen or raloxifene, according to the study in the August issue of Patient Education and Counseling.
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Elevator buttons more likely to be colonized by bacteria than toilet surfaces
Infection Control Today
Elevator buttons are more likely to be colonized by bacteria than toilet surfaces, a new Sunnybrook-led study of three large urban hospitals has found. "Elevators are a component of modern hospital care, and are used by multiple people with ungloved hands who will later go on to make contact with patients," says study co-author Dr. Donald Redelmeier, a staff physician in the division of general internal medicine at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and a researcher with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences.
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Study: Emergency surgeries on weekends riskier for kids
HealthDay News
Children who have emergency surgery on weekends are at greater risk for complications and potentially even death than those who have weekday surgeries, according to a new study. However, the Johns Hopkins researchers noted that the risk of death was "miniscule." The researchers analyzed data on nearly 440,000 simple emergency surgeries that children across the United States underwent over a 22-year period.
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Minimally invasive surgery underused at many US hospitals
John Hopkins Medicine
Hospitals across the country vary substantially in their use of minimally invasive surgery, even when evidence shows that for most patients, minimally invasive surgery is superior to open surgery, a new study shows. The finding represents a major disparity in the surgical care delivered at various hospitals, the study's authors say, and identifies an area of medicine ripe for improvement.
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Study: Advanced EHRs save 10 percent per patient
Health Leaders Media
A large study of electronic health records systems, which includes automation of ancillary services such as clinical data repository, pharmacy and laboratories, shows that they save money for third-party payers and patients, but not necessarily for hospitals. A sweeping examination of more than 5 million inpatient records at 550 hospitals during 2009 identified savings averaging 9.6 percent per patient — or $731 — from the 19 percent of hospitals that used advanced electronic health records when compared with hospitals that did not.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Nurses learn to work through generational diversity (By Keith Carlson)
6 reasons why nurses are the unsung heroes of the ER (The Huffington Post)
Minimizing burn out: how to take care of nurses (EndoNurse)
How to cut overreliance on contract nurses (Health Leaders Media)
Dark chocolate may ease walking for patients with artery disease (Reuters)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

MARN Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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