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Why nurses are the new auto workers
The Economist
Car manufacturing was the defining industry of the 20th century. In the 21st, it is healthcare. Health spending comprised 17 percent of America's gross domestic product in 2012. Those who are not doctors have a particularly important role — nurses and lesser-trained workers can monitor and care for patients out of hospital, which should result in better quality of life for patients and lower costs for everyone else. But just as the car industry was the 20th century's main battleground for fights over labor, it is increasingly clear that health workers will be at the center of the latest bitter conflict.
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MARN NEWS & UPDATES


Career Guides needed for ANA - Massachusetts (formerly MARN) Career Connections Program! New nurses need you!
ANA - Massachusetts (formerly MARN) is happy to announce that the new program to help senior nursing students and new graduates who anticipate entering their first professional nurse position is very popular! The aim of the Career Connections program is to match a novice nurse (the Seeker) with a professional nurse career guide. This is a great opportunity for nursing professionals to share their knowledge and experiences with novice nurses through this important transition to a professional position in nursing. Career Guides support and encourage the seeker throughout their transition as they enter professional practice. The role of the Career guide is to guide Seeker to:
  • Identify possible entry level positions
  • Critique cover letters and resumes
  • Provide coaching for interviews with nurse recruiters
  • Listen and support to novices’ questions and answer job-related concerns
Once matched, Career Guides and novice nurses arrange to meet at a mutually agreeable time. The connection is meant to end when novice nurses find their first position. To participate send name, position, snail mail address and phone number to Sabianca Delva at sabianca.delva@gmail.com

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Announcing CDC's Alcohol SBI Implementation Guide for Primary Care
Announcing the release of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s new resource, Planning and Implementing Screening and Brief Intervention for Risky Alcohol Use: A Step-by-Step Guide for Primary Care Practices.

Background:
At least 38 million adults drink too much but only about 5 million are alcoholics. Drinking too much includes high daily use, binge drinking, high weekly use, and any alcohol use by pregnant women or those under age 21. It causes about 88,000 deaths in the US each year, and in 2006 cost the economy about $224 billion.
Research shows that health professionals can use alcohol screening and brief intervention (SBI) to help people who are drinking too much to drink less. Alcohol SBI consists of a few questions asked in a doctor’s office and a short conversation. It can reduce excessive drinking by up to 25 percent. But a recent study showed that only 1 in 6 people reported ever talking with their doctor or other health professional about their alcohol use.
CDC hopes this guide will help practices implement alcohol SBI and thus reduce the wide range of health problems related to excessive drinking.

The Guide:
This guide provides detailed steps and resources to help staff in any primary care practice implement alcohol SBI.
It includes information on risky alcohol use, its effects on health, and how it can be addressed through alcohol SBI. The guide consists of 10 steps arranged in four major sections.

What you can do:
We need your help to get this guide into medical practices, encourage practices to use it, and encourage patients, health plans and employers to demand SBI.
We look forward to continuing our work together to ensure that we do all we can to make alcohol screening and brief intervention a routine part of healthcare.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  JBI Evidence-Based Practice Resources

Advance healthcare using content and tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), a global leader in evidence-based practice, only on Ovid. Search evidence in any specialty including systematic reviews, recommended practices, evidence summaries, patient handouts and more. Then use JBI’s unique tools to get evidence into practice.
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NCSBN Provides Nursys e-Notify Free of Charge to Nurse Employers
National Council of State Boards of Nursing has now eliminated the fee for nurse employers to utilize the e-Notify product!
When an employer subscribes to the tool, the employer can receive automatic notifications re: license renewal/expiration and/or disciplinary action taken on nurse employees. These notifications are provided for all nurse licenses a nurse may hold in any of the 50+ jurisdictions participating in Nursys.com — Here is a brief video.

The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) will now provide automatic licensure, discipline and publicly available notifications quickly, easily, securely and free of charge to institutions that employ nurses or maintain a registry of nurses free of charge through Nursys e-Notify.
Nursys is the only national database for licensure verification, discipline for registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical/vocational nurses (LPN/VNs) and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). Nursys data is pushed directly from participating[1] boards of nursing’s (BONs) databases through frequent, secured updates. Nursys is live and dynamic, and all updates to the system are reflected immediately.
Nursys is designated as a primary source equivalent database through a written agreement with participating BONs. NCSBN posts licensure and discipline information in Nursys as it is submitted by individual BONs. Institutions who subscribe to this innovative service do not have to proactively seek licensure or discipline information about their nurses because that information will be sent to them automatically. The e-Notify system alerts subscribers when modifications are made to a nurse’s record, including changes to:
  • License status;
  • License expirations;
  • License renewal; and
  • Public disciplinary action/resolutions and alerts/notifications.
If a nurse’s license is about to expire, the system will send a notification to the institution about the expiration date. If a nurse was disciplined by a BON, his/her institution will immediately learn about the disciplinary action, including access to available documents.
Institutions can learn more about Nursys e-Notify by viewing an introductory video at www.nursys.com.
For questions, contact nursysenotify@ncsbn.org.

[1] Except Alabama, Hawaii, Kansas and Oklahoma.

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NURSING & HEALTHCARE NEWS


Questioning medicine: EHRs and attention deficit
MedPage Today
Andrew Buelt, DO, and Joe Weatherly, DO, residents in family medicine at Bardmoor Family & Preventive Care in St. Petersburg, Florida, offer their views on issues confronting clinicians in their Questioning Medicine podcast. In this guest blog, Weatherly gives his take on how EHRs distract from patient care.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Free CNE credits are just a click away.

We've made it easy to earn free CNE online by offering 24/7 access to more than 40 courses on pediatric and adolescent healthcare. We also offer several courses approved for the ethics credits you now need and our new, short, CNE-accredited video tutorials are perfect for watching on the go.
 


HPV vaccine uptake remains 'unacceptably low,' CDC Says
Medscape (free login required)
Uptake of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in teenage girls and boys remains unacceptably low, even though there was a slight increase in coverage from 2012 to 2013. HPV coverage for girls increased 3.5 percent, from 53.8 percent in 2012 to 57.3 percent in 2013, according to data published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).
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Healthcare industry experiencing new demands for nurses
Richmond Times Dispatch
Nursing continues to be one of the fastest-growing occupations in the nation, as nurses make up the majority of the health care industry workforce. In fact, recent projections from a January 2014 report published in the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Occupational Outlook Handbook estimate the job growth to be 19 percent faster than the average occupation through 2022.
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Wanted: Nurse PhDs
Health Leaders Media
Of the nation's 3 million nurses, only about 1 percent of them hold doctoral degrees in nursing or a related field, but a new program from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation aims to boost that number. "We certainly hope to cause a bump in the trend," says Julie Fairman, RN, Ph.D., FAAN, Nightingale Professor in Nursing and Director of the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.
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Dextromethorphan abuse: A common choice for addicts of all ages
By Cynthia Sheppard Solomon
Available since the 1950s, dextromethorphan can be found in more than 140 different cough-and-cold remedies — both prescription and over the counter. When given for a cough at recommended low doses, usually it is free of serious side effects. But when the drug is taken in higher amounts, bizarre behavior, including hallucinations, is common. Given the effects of DXM abuse, patients are unlikely to present for care before considerable concentrations of the drug have been absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
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Why nurses are the new auto workers
The Economist
Car manufacturing was the defining industry of the 20th century. In the 21st, it is healthcare. Health spending comprised 17 percent of America's gross domestic product in 2012. Those who are not doctors have a particularly important role — nurses and lesser-trained workers can monitor and care for patients out of hospital...

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Replacing horizontal violence in the nursing profession
By Keith Carlson
Nurse bullying and so-called "horizontal violence" are rampant in our profession. Nurses bully and harass one another, using intimidation and other tactics as they jockey for power in a healthcare system that does not proactively attempt to prevent such disruptive behavior.

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Where's the best place to be a nurse?
The Clinical Advisor
Research based on job availability, competition, and salary suggests the Pacific Northwest states are the best places for nurses to practice. Oregon and Washington top WalletHub's “2014′s Best & Worst States for Nurses” list, while Southern regions states...

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Having a new imperative: Pleasing the patient
Dallas/Fort Worth Healthcare Daily
Although patient relationships consistently rank at the top of physician-satisfaction surveys, that relationship is changing. Patients, their demands, and time pressure are conspiring to sap physician autonomy. According to consultant PwC, five trends are driving the transformation from patient encounter to “customer experience.”
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Best practice for weight control targets preschoolers and parents
PsychCentral
New research finds a key element in the treatment of overweight and obese preschoolers is parental involvement. Investigators discovered traditional approaches to overweight prevention and treatment focusing only on the child are outdated, with interventions targeting both parent and child more effective.
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Spotlight on dermatology nursing
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
At Memorial Sloan Kettering, nurses are an integral part of our multidisciplinary care teams. Today, we’re putting the spotlight on our ten dermatology nurses, who treat patients with skin cancers as well as those whose skin is affected by other cancers or their treatments. Like other MSK nurses, our dermatology nurses practice relationship-based care, an approach that emphasizes the nurses’ relationships with patients and their families, with colleagues, and with themselves. “This translates to patient and family care that is nurturing, compassionate and individualized,” explains dermatology nurse Anna Skripnik.
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Could a probiotic prevent obesity?
Medical News Today
Between 1980 and 2008, the prevalence of worldwide obesity more than doubled. In the U.S. alone, almost 35 percent of adults are obese. With figures like these, the race is on to reduce obesity incidence and its related health complications. Now, researchers from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, say a probiotic that prevents obesity could be in sight.
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Cognitive impairment a concern for younger Type 1 diabetes patients
Diabetes in Control
Researchers from the Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, both in Houston, Texas, have found that sometimes within days of diagnosis, impairment of cognitive function can be seen in Type 1 children and adolescents. The study included 147 children with Type 1 diabetes between 5-18 years old. Children completed neurophysiological testing at the time of diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes and this data was compared to data from children in the same age range without the disease.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    More US RNs retire later, causing a larger workforce (Health Affairs Blog)
Finding work-life balance: Chore or joyful pursuit? (By Keith Carlson)
Reconsidering the 12-hour shift for nurses (Healthcare Traveler)
Cardiopulmonary events: Facial analysis may suggest severity (Medscape (free login required))

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

MARN Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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