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Call for Nominations ANA Massachusetts Awards
Deadline extended through January 15, 2015 for Living Legends in Massachusetts Nursing and Loyal Service Awards
AN OPPORTUNITY TO HONOR YOUR COLLEAGUES
American Nurses Association Massachusetts Awards open to All Nurses

ANA Massachusetts Awards honor the remarkable, but often unrecognized work of Massachusetts members. You probably work with or know nurse colleagues whose commitment to nursing and to patient care is exemplary. Yet in the rush of today's world, there is often little time to acknowledge them and their professional contributions.

You work with or know nurse colleagues whose commitment to nursing and to patient care is exemplary. Yet in the rush of today's world, there is often little time to acknowledge them and their professional contributions. ANA Massachusetts Awards provide you the opportunity to honor their remarkable, but often unrecognized practice.

ANA Massachusetts Awards are not restricted to ANA Massachusetts members. Nominees can be a member of ANA Massachusetts or a non ANA Massachusetts member who is nominated by a member of ANA Massachusetts. These awards can be peer or self nominated. ANA Massachusetts has established several awards that provide you the opportunity to recognize those nurses who have made a difference at the bedside, in the classroom, and in the practice of nursing.
More Information and to access applications, click here.

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Friend of Nursing Award
This award is for a person or persons who have demonstrated strong support for the profession of nursing in Massachusetts. The candidate for this award may be self- nominated or be nominated by a colleague. Award recipients are asked to serve on the following year’s selection committee. Click here to nominate a friend.
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Authors Wanted for the Massachusetts Report on Nursing
Needed: Articles for The Spring 2015 edition of the Massachusetts Report on Nursing
Remember: The ANA Massachusetts newsletter is read by about 110,000 RNs in the Commonwealth! This is YOUR newsletter so we need YOU to make a contribution!
This year we are focusing on safe staffing and encourage you to weigh in on this important issue!
Your ideas about features to include in future newsletters are always welcome. The more input, the better!!
Your contribution can be sent to myracacace@charter.net or mailed to ANA Massachusetts Newsletter, P. O. Box 285, Milton, MA 02186.
Deadline date for submission is January 10, 2015!

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  CNE by Nurses, for Nurses.

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ICN-Burdett Global Nursing Leadership Institute 2015 open for applications
Burdett Trust for Nursing
The International Council of Nurses (ICN) and the Burdett Trust for Nursing today opened applications for the 2015 Global Nursing Leadership Institute (GNLI) to be held in Geneva, Switzerland, Sept. 5-11, 2015. Under the theme the “Future Work of Nurses,” participants in the 2015 GNLI, will have the opportunity to learn policy and sustainability strategies and innovations in a Post-2015 world. The next goal in public health will be the implementation and evaluation of universal health coverage.
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Save the Dates
Massachusetts Student Nurses Association
2015 Career Forum
Sunday, March 22, 2015
Event Flyer, click here.

ANA Massachusetts Health Policy Legislative Forum
Tuesday, March 24, 2014
Massachusetts State House

Annual Business Meeting
Friday, April 10, 2015

ANA Massachusetts Spring Conference
Living Legends in Nursing and Annual Awards Banquet
Friday, April 10, 2015

Annual Spring Conference
Theme: The Courage to Care in the Face of Infectious Disease
Saturday, April 11, 2015
Dedham Hilton Hotel • Dedham, MA

Massachusetts Health Council's 5th Women's Health Forum Getting Healthy, Staying Healthy: Knowledge is Everything
April 16, 2015
Westin Copley Place, Boston

Celebrate National Nurses Day with ANA Massachusetts at Fenway
Wednesday, May 6, 2015
Pregame Networking Event
Game time - Red Sox vs. Tampa Bay

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As 2014 comes to a close, the publisher of the ANA-Massachusetts Nursing Flash would like to wish its readers, partners and other industry professionals a safe and happy holiday season. As we reflect on the past year for the industry, we would like to provide the readers of the ANA-Massachusetts Nursing Flash a look at the most-accessed articles from the year. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 6, 2015.


1. American nurse with protective gear gets Ebola; how could this happen?
CNN
From Oct. 14: On the surface, the nurse in Texas seemed to have taken all the precautions needed to protect herself from Ebola. She wore a mask, gown, shield and gloves. Her patient, a man who contracted the virus in Africa, was in isolation at the Dallas hospital where she worked. And yet the woman, whose name has not been released, still contracted Ebola, marking the first known transmission ever in the United States. A nurse in Spain who also treated an Ebola patient also caught the virus.
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2. Ditching your stethoscope for your smartphone?
The Dallas Morning News
From Nov. 4: Speaking at the American Academy of Family Practice Assembly this month, Eric Topal, M.D., suggested many of our routine medical practice devices could quickly become "relics" as we all advance our technological services. As a cardiologist, Topal uses his smart phone for just about everything. He ditched his stethoscope and stopped taking patient's pulses. Instead, he is able to get more information from his smartphone. He demonstrated the technologically advanced use of his smart phone as an echocardiogram; in addition, he demonstrated use of the phone as a glucose monitor, blood pressure and heart rate tracker. Topal also suggests smartphone technology translates to less costs.
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3. Why nurses are the new auto workers
The Economist
From July 29: Car manufacturing was the defining industry of the 20th century. In the 21st, it is healthcare. Health spending comprised 17 percent of America's gross domestic product in 2012. Those who are not doctors have a particularly important role — nurses and lesser-trained workers can monitor and care for patients out of hospital, which should result in better quality of life for patients and lower costs for everyone else. But just as the car industry was the 20th century's main battleground for fights over labor, it is increasingly clear that health workers will be at the center of the latest bitter conflict.
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4. Blood test predicts Alzheimer's disease
CNN
From March 11: In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have developed a blood test for Alzheimer's disease that predicts with astonishing accuracy whether a healthy person will develop the disease. Though much work still needs to be done, it is hoped the test will someday be available in doctors' offices, since the only methods for predicting Alzheimer's right now, such as PET scans and spinal taps, are expensive, impractical, often unreliable and sometimes risky.
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5. National nursing shortage fueled by lack of teachers
ABC News
From Oct. 7: They’re often the first people you see at the doctor’s office, and the first line of defense in any ER – but America’s nursing population is shrinking fast. The nursing shortage may not be caused just by lack of interest. In many ways, it’s caused by lack of capacity. Each year, 80,000 applicants are turned away from nursing schools, often because there aren’t enough teachers or resources to accommodate growing student interest. “Suddenly, we turned around and realized we’re not attracting enough nurses to go into teaching,” said Dr. Kimberly S. Glassman, with patient care services and the chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Medical Center.
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6. Mysterious polio-like illness affects kids in California
USA Today
From Feb. 25: A mysterious polio-like syndrome has affected as many as 25 California children, leaving them with paralyzed limbs and little hope of recovery. "What's we're seeing now is bad. The best-case scenario is complete loss of one limb, the worst is all four limbs, with respiratory insufficiency, as well. It's like the old polio," said Keith Van Haren, a pediatric neurologist at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital in Palo Alto, California.
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7. Flu now widespread in the United States
USA Today
From Jan. 7: This year's flu season is now in full swing. Nationally people are beginning to be hospitalized and die due to the flu, which is in all parts of the country and still on the up slope, public health agencies report. At least one flu expert thinks anxiety will rise soon as this year's flu strain takes a higher toll on children and middle-age adults. The flu season began most heavily in the South but has now spread nationwide with cases increasing in all states, said Joseph Bresee, a flu expert with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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8. Nurses: Overworked and understaffed on the front lines
Healthline
From July 5: There are 2.7 million nurses in America, and a new survey of more than 3,300 of them found that nurses are stressed, overworked, underappreciated and underutilized. Of more than 3,300 nurses surveyed by the Vickie Milazzo Institute in Houston, 64 percent said they rarely get seven to eight hours of sleep per night, and 31 percent said they get enough sleep just two to three nights a week. And despite being in the health industry, 77 percent of nurses said they regularly do not eat well.
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9. A nurse's story: On the front lines of Ebola outbreak
CBS News
From Aug. 12: When Doctors Without Borders nurse Monia Sayah first arrived in Guinea in March, she couldn't have known she would witness the worst Ebola outbreak in history. Back then, there were 59 confirmed deaths from Ebola, a virus which can be fatal in up to 90 percent of cases. The death toll in West Africa has since soared to 932, the World Health Organization said. In Guinea, where the first cases were reported in March, Ebola has killed 363 people.
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10. Where's the best place to be a nurse?
The Clinical Advisor
From June 3: Research based on job availability, competition, and salary suggests the Pacific Northwest states are the best places for nurses to practice. Oregon and Washington top WalletHub's “2014′s Best & Worst States for Nurses” list, while Southern regions states Mississippi and Louisiana ranked last of among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. “The nursing industry is expected to grow far faster than the average occupation through 2022,” wrote WalletHub, “and the various day-to-day demands placed on nursing professionals are indeed profession-specific.”
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ANA Massachusetts Nursing Flash
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
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