This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive    Media Kit |  Bilingual Education Marketplace:    

Home   Research   Advocacy   Publications   Conference   Press Room   About Us   Join   NABE Store Feb. 14, 2013


Great Teachers Wanted: Multiple Languages


French, Spanish, Chinese, and ELL needed to teach
in our diverse schools in Baton Rouge, Louisiana
ebrschools.org


You Can Make
A Difference!


Tyler ISD is currently seeking bilingual teachers and instructional leaders with expertise in Bilingual/ESL education.
MORE

 




 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S COLUMN

You were part of an amazing success story — Si se pudo!
NABE
On behalf of the NABE Executive Board, Conference Co-Chairs, Affiliate Chairs and Members, Sponsors, Volunteers, Exhibitors, Parents, Students, Teachers, Professors, Administrators, Attendees, Policy makers, Disney Staff, Conference Coordinator, Staff and Executive Director, I personally extend our heartfelt thanks of appreciation and gratitude for your participation in our 42nd Annual International Bilingual Education Conference recently held in one of the most beautiful settings in the country at Disney Coronado Springs Resort in Orlando, Fla. The much anticipated "Bilingual Education: Magic Happens" conference was attended by almost 3,000 education professionals throughout the nation and the world and enjoyed a stellar lineup of internationally renown presenters such as Ofelia Garcia, Eduardo Padron, Alberto Carvalho, Alma Flor Ada, Martha Kanter, Kenji Hakuta, Diane August, Joanne Urrutia, Xavier De La Torre, David Lawrence, Catherine Snow, Luis Zayas, Javier Palomares, Consuelo Kickbush and many more.

Conference participants enjoyed in depth professional development and best practices on Helping English Language Learners meet the Common Core Standards; Getting Ready for the New Assessments; Building a Better Accountability System for All; Strategies for Closing the Opportunity and Achievement Gap, in a Globally Competitive Technological Era; Preparing Students and Teachers for Career Readiness and Colleges, Business Expectations in a Global Market, and the Importance of Parent-Child-Teacher Interaction. The Conference was highlighted by over 300 concurrent, featured and special sessions, including SIGs. A full day was dedicated to a strong Parent Education Component and a very successful National Education Leadership Forum. Affiliate members came as far away as Guam, Palao, Puerto Rico, Philippines and Alaska.

NABE invites everyone to participate in its upcoming Intensive Dual Language Summer Institute in Puerto Rico during the first week of July and also at the NABE's 43rd annual conference in San Diego, Calf., on Feb. 12-16, 2014. Reservation is required for the Puerto Rico conference by calling the NABE (240-450-3700) office and providing your name and contact information.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article




Important notice on the NABE 2013 election
NABE
This year, NABE Members will be voting to elect a total of three regional members of the NABE Executive Board. One representative will be elected from each of the three regions (eastern, central and western). Deadline for submitting the documentations (nomination petition, candidate information sheet, black and white photograph) is March 2. All documents must be received in the NABE office by March 2 at the close of business. This year's election will be conducted by electronic, online voting beginning May 3-31. The executive director will be certifying the election results and the board will announce the newly elect representative of the NABE Executive Board on June 7. All of the forms are available online at www.NABE.org. You may also contact Executive Director Dr. Santiago Wood (svwood@bellsouth.net) for additional information.

Special notice:

Section A. Nomination of Candidate.
Qualified candidates for the NABE Executive Board may be nominated for election in one of two ways: (1) by the Written petition of any NABE affiliate organization in good standing, which may nominate one candidate for Executive Board each year, or (2) by the written petition of any five NABE members in good standing.

Section B. Qualifications of Candidates.
Candidates for the Executive Board of Directors must be NABE members in good standing, and must have been members in good standing for one year prior to their nomination.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


 INDUSTRY NEWS


Education Trust slams NCLB waivers for neglecting at-risk students
Education Week
On the day a Senate committee is holding hearings on the waivers granted under No Child Left Behind, the Education Trust released a report criticizing the Obama administration's flexibility plan for failing to address the needs of at-risk students. The report called "A Step Forward or a Step Back? State Accountability in the Waiver Era," reiterates many of the criticisms the Ed Trust and other advocacy groups have raised. It clearly shows that although some of the Ed Trust's ideas were incorporated into the waiver requirements, the advocacy group is unhappy with how these waivers are playing out.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ReadingA-Z.com Makes Reading Fun!

Improve your students’ reading abilities no matter what language they speak with ReadingA-Z.com! This 27-level reading plan allows students to progress at their own speed while learning with the rest of the class. Thousands of printable and projectable books and support materials. Available in English, British English, Spanish and French.
 


Duncan to Congress: Giving states flexibility is working
U.S. Department of Education
Secretary Arne Duncan testified on Capitol Hill Thursday during a hearing on ESEA flexibility. States and their schools are breaking free from the restrictions of No Child Left Behind and pursuing new and better ways to prepare and protect all students, Education Secretary Arne Duncan told a Senate committee.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


California failing to deliver vital instruction to thousands of English learner students
District Administration Magazine
The organizations have sent a demand letter to State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson and members of the State Board of Education urging them to fulfill their statutory and constitutional duties by taking specific steps detailed in a report. More than 20,000 English language students across 251 school districts — more than a quarter of California school districts that have English language students enrolled — have not been receiving any services to help them learn English. The lack of instruction violates legal mandates and is in spite of studies showing that English language students denied those services are more likely to fail or drop out of school.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Reader's Theater Helps Increase Achievement

K-6 scripts in Spanish or English have roles at the right level for each student, and test scores improved with a curriculum that included multi-leveled Reader's Theater series. Literary and content-area scripts make learning active, effective, and fun, while also making complex text and grade-level content accessible. Free sampler.
 


Common Core technology requirements outlined
Education Week
One of the two consortia designing tests for the Common Core State Standards recently released new guidance on the minimum technology standards states will need to meet to give those tests, beginning in 2014-2015. The Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC, says the guidance is meant to provide direction to states and districts on the extent to which current technology meets testing standards, or whether upgrades will be required.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Literacy by 3rd grade a renewed priority for states
The Associated Press via The Huffington Post
Flunked, retained, held back. Whatever you call it, increasing numbers of states are not promoting students who are struggling to read at the end of third grade. Thirty-two states have passed legislation designed to improve third-grade literacy, according to the Education Commission of the States. Retention is part of the policies in 14 states, with some offering more leeway than others.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


FEATURED ARTICLE
TOP TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Pinellas, Fla., schools aim higher for non-English speaking students
Tampa Bay Times
While total enrollment in Pinellas, Fla., schools has been steadily declining, the number of English language learners has increased 45 percent in six years. A growing piece of a shrinking pie, these students will more and more define the success of Pinellas schools. But they're not doing particularly well. English language learners in Pinellas perform significantly worse than their native-speaker peers on reading, math and science tests, and their scores are below average for English language learners across Florida.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
What the Latino achievement gap really looks like
ABC News
This year, 1-in-4 public elementary school students is Latino, an indication that the young Latino population is growing quickly. But, Latino students still lag behind their white peers in high school graduation rates across the country, according to preliminary data released last week by U.S. Department of Education. The report shows that in a state-by-state breakdown of high school graduation rates, Hispanic students were less likely to graduate from high school than whites and Asians in all but two states over the 2010-2011 school year.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Schools falter at keeping ELL families in the loop
Education Week
As thousands of communities — especially in the South — became booming gateways for immigrant families during the 1990s and the early years of the new century, public schools struggled with the unfamiliar task of serving the large numbers of English learners arriving in their classrooms. Instructional programs were built from scratch. Districts had to train their own teachers to teach English to non-native speakers or recruit teachers from elsewhere. School staff members had to figure out how to communicate with parents who spoke no English.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


For bilingual instructor the classroom is family
Keizertimes
One day almost 20 years ago, Linda Gerig was working with a group of new fifth-grade students in the library at Kennedy Elementary School and the students began chatting about the many things they had in the U.S. and how they compared to what they had in Mexico. Gerig turned it into a lesson about comparing and contrasting and asked the students what they had in Mexico that they didn't have in the U.S. The question spurred silence until one brave student raised his hand.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Pinellas, Fla., schools aim higher for non-English speaking students
Tampa Bay Times
While total enrollment in Pinellas, Fla., schools has been steadily declining, the number of English language learners has increased 45 percent in six years. A growing piece of a shrinking pie, these students will more and more define the success of Pinellas schools. But they're not doing particularly well. English language learners in Pinellas perform significantly worse than their native-speaker peers on reading, math and science tests, and their scores are below average for English language learners across Florida.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Holding states and schools accountable
The New York Times
As Congress contemplates rewriting No Child Left Behind, President George W. Bush's signature education law, legislators will tussle over a vision of how the federal government should hold states and schools accountable for students’ academic progress. At a Senate education committee hearing to discuss waivers to states on some provisions of the law, Senator Lamar Alexander, Republican of Tennessee, forcefully urged the federal government to get out of the way.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more




Teachers team up for English language learning
Twin Falls Times-News
About 15 English language learners looked at a list of error-filled sentences projected onto a whiteboard at Canyon Ridge High School in Idaho. "Who wants to do one?" English teacher Ron James asked. A few hands shot up. One student went up to the whiteboard, grabbed a whiteboard marker and started adding missing punctuation to a sentence. Classmates pointed to the board and told him what else he needed to change.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


No Child Left Behind: Early lessons from state flexibility waivers
U.S. Department of Education
Testimony of Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions: "Chairman Harkin, Ranking Member Alexander, and Members of the Committee. Thank you for inviting me here today to testify on the flexibility that the Department of Education has provided under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to empower States, districts, and schools to move forward with reforms that benefit all students. I say that we have provided flexibility under the law to States, which is true, but the guiding principle of ESEA flexibility is that it is for students."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


US states, local governments plead for new 'No Child Left Behind'
Reuters
U.S. state and local officials again called on Congress to pass renewed "No Child Left Behind" education legislation, writing in a letter on Tuesday that it must become "a top priority for every member of the House and Senate." Nearly a year ago — on Feb. 6, 2012 — the same groups, including the National Governors Association, the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National School Boards Association, made a similar plea to reauthorize the federal education funding law.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Quincy, Mass., teachers about to get U.S.-mandated training
The Patriot Ledger
Quincy, Mass., will be among the first school districts in the state to enroll teachers in training mandated by the U.S. Department of Justice on how to better cater to students who are learning English. The training is part of the state's response to an admonishment from the U.S. Department of Justice, which two years ago found that Massachusetts was not in compliance with a federal law that requires equal education opportunities.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


 

NABE Weekly eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Hailey Sasser, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
Contribute news

This edition of the NABE Weekly eNews was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Feb. 14, 2013
Feb. 7, 2013
Jan. 31, 2013
Jan. 24, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063