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 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S COLUMN

NABE 44th Annual Conference Achieving Global Competence:
Biliteracy for All

NABE
The National Association for Bilingual Education is the only nationwide network of professionals dedicated to serving English language learners in the United States via education programs and legislative advocacy. For the past four decades, NABE has been committed to excellence in bilingual and biliteracy education for all students through enriched educational programs and intensive professional development for teachers, administrators, professors, policymakers and parents. Additionally, NABE provides extensive research in the field via its Bilingual Research Journal, NABE Perspectives, NABE Journal of Research and Practice and the NABE eNews. NABE is committed to promoting programs and innovations that prepare our nation's students to be fluently bilingual, technologically creative, globally competitive and well-rounded world citizens by advancing legislation and policies at both the state and national levels that best serve language minority students.
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NABE 2015 National Educational Leadership
NABE
Forum Courageous Leadership: Actualizing Biliteracy for ALL

Take advantage of this great opportunity!
Dr. Julio Cruz, President, NABE Presentation of the 2015
Vision and Action: Promoting Biliteracy for All Award
Recipient: Santa Clara County Office of Education

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Statement from The Education Trust on the Student Success Act, H.R. 5
The Education Trust
The Education Trust issued the following statement expressing our disappointment with the House Education Committee's passing of Chairman John Kline's "Student Success Act" or H.R. 5. "Each previous iteration of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, or ESEA, moved the country forward on correcting longstanding injustices in its educational systems. Unless it is significantly improved as it moves through Congress, the Student Success Act will turn back the clock."
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  FREE Samples at NABE Conference

Receive a FREE Spanish or English sample of Benchmark Education's informational texts, Reader's Theater, or intervention materials for Grades K-8. Innovative resources develop close reading, use of text evidence, and other skills for the new standards. Visit booth 307 or click here to request your free sample online.
 


The Student Success Act takes away resources from students who need them the most
NABE
The House of Representatives is expected to vote on the Student Success Act (H.R. 5), a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Help us oppose H.R. 5, which walks away from the commitment our nation made 50 years ago to help all our country's children succeed in school.
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NABE 2015 National Educational Leadership Forum
Courageous Leadership: Actualizing Biliteracy for ALL

NABE
Friday, March 6
In the 21st century, biliteracy and multilingualism, along with distinct skills such as communication, collaboration and critical thinking, are crucial for student success in a global economy and society. In this Educational Leadership Forum, participants will engage with national leaders who have been successful in leading efforts to promote biliteracy. Panelists will share their experiences that pertain to leadership roles at all levels (international, national, university, district and site) and describe how they attained positive results for bilingual/dual language immersion and world language programs.



 INDUSTRY NEWS


Simple exercises to improve ELL reading skills
By: Douglas Magrath
Reading is an essential means of communication. Reading involves the recognition of large units — words and word groups — along with phonetic decoding. Reading is not just a passive activity; rather it is an active skill where the reader interacts with the text bringing many different skills into the process. Strategies are deliberate steps that the learners take when processing new material. The students must not only know about these strategies, but they must also be trained in their use.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
 
Gwinnett County Public Schools, located in metro Atlanta, is the largest school system in Georgia with 173,000 students and growing. GCPS is a school system of choice for people moving to the Atlanta area and a two-time winner of the Broad Prize of Urban Education (2010 & 2014).
 


More conflict over cutting federal role in education
The New York Times
As the House of Representatives prepared to take up a Republican proposal for the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind, Congress and the White House inched toward a confrontation over the federal role in education. The House is expected to pass a plan this week that would cut back federal regulation of education from kindergarten through 12th grade and give state and local authorities more discretion over everything from assessing teacher and student performance to the flow of Title I money, the largest stream of federal funding for low-income students.
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New report shows decrease in college foreign language enrollment
Deseret News
A new report from the Modern Language Association shows a dramatic decrease in the number of college students enrolled in foreign language classes. The Washington Post reported that 100,000 fewer students were enrolled in foreign language classes in 2013 than in 2009. The decrease in language enrollment was also present in popular language classes, such as Spanish, marking the first time since 1958 that enrollment in Spanish has fallen.
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Capital culture
Language Magazine
Introducing cultural issues in the business English for specific purposes curriculum is a daunting task, given the complexity and scope of the topic, as well as the perceived limitations of a business English course. Many practitioners avoid raising these issues as a result, or simply because they appear to be beyond the scope of a language course, especially business English. Nonetheless, creating a curriculum that does not acknowledge the importance of culture, including pragmatics and critical thinking, and its effect on communication would be irresponsible when preparing students for international business interaction.
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Cross-cultural communication: Much more than just a linguistic stretch
McGill University via Science Daily
If you are a Mandarin-speaker from China and want to understand how someone else is feeling, you are likely to concentrate on their voice rather than on their face. The opposite is true for English language speakers in North America, who tend to "read" the emotions of others in their facial expressions rather than in their tone of voice. These cultural/linguistic differences run so deep that they are to be found not only in terms of behavior, but even at the level of brain activity, according to a study recently published by McGill researchers in Neuropsychologia.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How cultural differences can affect learning (By: Douglas Magrath)
English learners mastering language at quicker pace (The Oregonian)
New York compels 20 school districts to lower barriers to immigrants (The New York Times)
Statement from The Education Trust on the Student Success Act, H.R. 5 (The Education Trust)
Obama vows to fight back after federal ruling stalls immigration protections (Education Week)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



Dealing with Common Core backlash
District Administration Magazine
As debate over the Common Core continues to spread in major media outlets, local administrators must address parent and community concerns to keep the focus on student learning. "The need for parent communication with the Common Core caught many administrators by surprise, because this idea of having standards and revising curriculum isn't new for district administrators," says Sandra Alberti, director of field impact at Student Achievement Partners, a nonprofit started by Common Core creators to help educators implement the standards.
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Fariña adds deputy chancellor role for English language learners
Chalkbeat
New York City Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña has promoted the head of the office of English language learners to a deputy chancellor role, she announced, a move that underscores her focus on improving education for those students. Milady Baez, who has been serving as the chief of the division of English language learners since the newly independent office was created in August, has joined Fariña's small cabinet as deputy chancellor for English language learners, who account for one out of seven students in the school system.
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Miss an issue of the NABE Weekly eNews? Click here to visit the NABE Weekly eNews archive page.


The tangled roots of English
The New York Times
The peoples of India, Iran and Europe speak a Babel of tongues, but most — English included — are descended from an ancient language known as proto-Indo-European. Scholars have argued for two centuries about the identity and homeland of those who spoke this parent language, but a surprisingly sudden resolution of this longstanding issue may be at hand.
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9 lessons learned during ELL immersion
MiddleWeb (commentary)
Talk about immersion. In our state, every teacher and every school administrator is now being required to take an English Language Sheltered Immersion course for re-certification, and the mad scramble to get spots in the few courses being offered by the state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has been fierce.
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Language learning after 10 may be better for the brain
Counsel&Heal
Learning new languages after the age of 10 is better for the brain, according to a new study. New findings revealed that people who began learning English around age 10 showed significant improvements in white matter structure compared to other people who grew up speaking only English. Researchers noted that improvements in the brain's "higher levels of structural integrity" boost language learning and semantic processing.
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