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 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S COLUMN





45th Annual NABE Conference
March 3-5
Hilton Chicago

NABE
NABE's mission is to advocate for our nation's Bilingual and English Language Learners and families and to cultivate a multilingual multicultural society by supporting and promoting policy, programs, pedagogy, research and professional development that yield academic success, value native language, lead to English proficiency, and respects cultural and linguistic diversity.

NABE seeks proposals that engage participants in topics related to quality education for DLLs such as:
  • achieving educational equity for DLLs
  • ensuring social justice for DLLs through strong linguistic and academic attainment
  • providing equal educational opportunities for DLLs
By using a peer review process with a panel of over 35 reviewers from across the nation NABE ensures that all accepted proposals are of the highest quality for our attendees.

NABE invites all education experts, researchers, authors and successful practitioners with information of interest to submit a proposal. We also encourage multilingual proposals.

Click here to Submit your proposal. Proposal submission will be open through June 30.

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AFT, NABE, TESOL on Senate Bipartisan ESEA Bill
NABE
Leaders of three organizations representing the majority of educators who teach English language learners said Monday they are encouraged by the Senate bipartisan Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization proposal. "The proposed bill represents a significant step forward to support the academic and language needs of ELLs, to adequately prepare teachers to work with ELLs, and to promote equity," said leaders of the American Federation of Teachers, the National Association for Bilingual Education and TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) International Association, in a statement to their members.
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Every Child Achieves
NABE
The Coalition for Teaching Quality — comprised of more than 100 civil rights, disability, rural, youth, parent, community, educator and principal organizations — thanks you for your leadership in developing bipartisan legislation to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the Every Child Achieves Act. We write today to specifically comment on the teacher and principal quality provisions in the bill.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Opposition to Inclusion of S. 1052 (GREAT) Act in ESEA
NABE
As 91 organizations concerned with promoting educational quality and equity, particularly for students who have traditionally been least well-served by our education system, we are deeply committed to the development of well-prepared, experienced, and effective teachers for all communities, and to ensuring that every student has a fully prepared and effective teacher. We write to you with significant concerns about S.1052, the "Growing Education Achievement Training Academies for Teachers and Principals (GREAT) Act." We strongly oppose its enactment or inclusion in ESEA reauthorization.
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Selected recommendations on ESEA reauthorization regarding English language working group on ELL Policy
ELL Policy
English language learners comprise almost 10 percent of the U.S. student population at any given time. Many more students have been ELLs at some point in their schooling. In four states (Texas, New Mexico, Nevada and California) the percentages are significantly higher, ranging from 15 to 24 percent of the state's students. Moreover, many states in the Southeast and Midwest have experienced explosive ELL growth. Since the last re-­authorization of ESEA, the numbers of ELLs have increased substantially, and growth is more broadly distributed across the nation.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
 
Gwinnett County Public Schools, located in metro Atlanta, is the largest school system in Georgia with 173,000 students and growing. GCPS is a school system of choice for people moving to the Atlanta area and a two-time winner of the Broad Prize of Urban Education (2010 & 2014).
 


Title III English Leaners FY16 Final
NABE
As the Subcommittee considers the Fiscal Year 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations bill, we respectfully urge you to provide the President's Budget request of $773.4 million for Title III Language Acquisition Grant, consistent with the considerable growth of English learners being served in our nation's public schools.
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Seal of Biliteracy Guidelines released
NABE
The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, the National Association of Bilingual Education, the National Council of State Supervisors for Languages, and TESOL International Association, have officially drafted recommendations for the implementation of the Seal of Biliteracy. The Seal of Biliteracy is an award made by a state department of education or local district to recognize a student who has attained proficiency in English and one or more other world languages by high school graduation. The recognition of attaining biliteracy becomes part of the high school transcript and diploma for these students.
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NCLR applauds bipartisan effort on education bill; remains concerned about accountability
NCLR
he Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee voted unanimously to send the "Every Child Achieves Act" to the Senate floor. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) applauds the leadership of Chairman Lamar Alexander, R–Tenn., and Ranking Member Patty Murray, D–Wash., on their bipartisan work in moving the bill this far. "We are grateful for the efforts of members of Congress who have put the future of our nation's children at the forefront of the discussion and joined together in this bipartisan effort," said Delia Pompa, Senior Vice President of Programs, NCLR.
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NABE 2017
Scheduled for Hilton Anatole, Dallas on Feb. 23-25 with Pre-Conference on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017.


 INDUSTRY NEWS


What we talk about when we talk about best practices: Reading and writing
By: Debra Josephson Abrams
In previous articles, we have explored best practices in curricula, methods and approaches, multiple instructional approaches, choosing materials and assessment. In this article — the final in the series — we examine the content elements necessary for inclusion in a best practices-based curriculum. There is no dispute that a broad and deep vocabulary is necessary for academic success, just as there is no dispute that ELLs generally have a paucity of vocabulary.
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Texas protects dual language education
Language Magazine
Texas has been an advocate for dual language education since 1973 when former Governor Dolph Briscoe signed into law the Bilingual Education and Training Act, which abolished the English-only teaching requirement imposed in 1918. This April, Texas Senator José Rodríguez’s Senate Bill 159, which will help maintain and expand cutting-edge dual-language education in schools across the state, including programs in the El Paso Independent School District, passed the Senate and will now move to the Texas House.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword BILINGUAL.


In US schools, undocumented youths strive to adjust
Education Week
Kevin faced a traumatic journey to the United States in search of a better life. The 19-year-old undocumented immigrant from El Salvador faced yet another set of challenges when he arrived in the United States last year and enrolled in school. First came the laughs of classmates poking fun at his halting English. Then came the puzzled looks from teachers struggling to understand those same words. But a new place in the same place has made all the difference for Kevin.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    On the high school diploma: A 'bilingual' stamp of approval? (NPR)
Selected recommendations on ESEA reauthorization regarding English language working group on ELL Policy (ELL Policy)
Learning the language: Hour-long class helps young Latinos become fully bilingual (The Times News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



Learning English happens best when conversation is part of curriculum
Phys.org
A new teaching model using small groups significantly improves how well English language learners increase vocabulary and reading comprehension, according to a pioneering new study by researchers at the University of Georgia. Using a conversational instruction method, where a teacher presents small groups of students with a question and asks them to work out the answer among the group, English language learners increased language skills and reading comprehension when compared with traditional classroom teaching.
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JCPS tweaks waiver request for English language learners
The Courier-Journal
Jefferson County Public Schools in Kentucky is scaling back a waiver request to the state that would take some of the burden off schools with large populations of students with limited English proficiency. As the Courier-Journal recently reported, JCPS has requested a waiver from the Kentucky Department of Education to have the accountability results of students who are still learning English to be attributed only to the district, instead of potentially bringing down schools' scores. Right now, English-language learners are granted one year of English instruction in Kentucky before their scores start counting toward schools' and districts' accountability scores. JCPS' original waiver was to remove from schools' scores the test results of students who are shown to be below a certain level of proficiency in English.
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Reading to children causes brain activity in areas essential to language development
Medical Daily
Many of our earliest memories feature us curling up next to our parents and listening to them read our favorite book. Whether it was Dr. Seuss (my personal favorite was “Hop on Pop”) or “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie,” our parents were doing us a serious favor by sharing a good story, helping us to develop our reading and language skills for later. While it has long been known that reading to a child before preschool is important in cognitive development, researchers at the Pediatric Academic Societies have found, through MRI technology, that reading to a child causes activity in the brain related to reading skill development, verbal development, and image development, giving children a cognitive advantage early on.
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As funding dries up, a rural school district struggles to help Latino kids
StateImpact Ohio
Tecumseh School District, just outside of Springfield, includes the tiny towns of New Carlisle and Medway — and a whole lot of farm fields and two-lane highways. "This is a cow," says English paraprofessional Liz Toro. She's giving two little girls at Park Layne Elementary their daily English lesson. "What sound does a cow make?" she says, pointing at a picture of a cow. "Moo! Yes." There are more than 60 English language learners here — Toro and another English aide see each of them for about a half hour a day, in small groups. She says when the kids go to take standardized tests, something as simple as a reference to a cow could get lost, because the kid knows what a cow is, but doesn't know the English word.
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A new path to English language learning
Boston College via Science Daily
Migration and globalization are placing thousands of second language learners in the classrooms of teachers who lack training in language instruction. As a result, schools face the challenge of preparing educators to foster inclusive, effective language learning. In a 7-year study at a Boston elementary school where half the students are English language learners, setting a school-wide goal of improved writing skills and using a genres-based instructional method improved the performance of ELL students on state and internal assessments, according to Boston College Lynch School of Education Professor Maria E. Brisk, who presented her findings at the American Educational Research Association annual meeting.
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NABE Weekly eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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