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Home   Research   Advocacy   Publications   Conference   Press Room   About Us   Join   NABE Store May. 30, 2013


Great Teachers Wanted: Multiple Languages


French, Spanish, Chinese, and ELL needed to teach
in our diverse schools in Baton Rouge, Louisiana
ebrschools.org

 




 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S COLUMN

NABE Perspectives Jan-Feb 2013
NABE
Dear NABE Members,
One of the premier benefits that NABE members receive is the highly prized Perspectives, the magazine of the National Association for Bilingual Education. The magazine is editor reviewed, and it includes articles especially designed for bilingual educators and provides cutting edge information on exemplary dual language, multicultural and biliteracy programs. It also deals with public policy issues, research developments, best instructional practices, and other valuable information affecting administrators and educators who work with English language learners.

Click here is the latest issue of the Perspectives, with a strong focus on bilingual special education. Click here for more information on how to update your NABE profile.
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Immigration bill update
U.S. State Senate Committee Channel
As you will recall, HEC wrote the Senate Judiciary on five education-related committee amendments within the Senate immigration debate. Two highlights:
  • The committee passed Hirono 21, as amended (to allow DREAMers and Blue Card holders to qualify for federal loans, work study, and services under the Higher Education Act; Pell was taken out)
  • The committee passed Coons 10 (to allow all individuals authorized to work access to professional, commercial, and business licenses; this approach would effectively prevent anti-immigrant states and localities from keeping professional licenses (like teaching certificates and medical and nursing licenses) and small business permits from many immigrants).
The two amendments on STEM moneys were addressed. The Blumenthal amendment on Little DREAMer has not been raised so far.

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 INDUSTRY NEWS


North Carolina school a standout for bilingual education
La Prensa
A North Carolina school has become a national model for its bilingual curriculum that offers students of different origins an education in both English and Spanish. When the eighth-grade students at Charlotte's Collinswood Language Academy finish their classes they will be the first group to complete one of the most innovative programs for bilingual education in the United States.
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SHOWCASE
  Help Denver change the future

At CMS Community School in Denver, CO we need educators with a passion for developing bi-literate, multicultural students. A dual-language school located in Southwest Denver, we are striving to help Spanish-, Vietnamese-, and English-speaking students learn and excel in Spanish and English. Learn more about the opportunities at CMS here.
 


Language is in our biology
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology via Science Daily
If you want to master languages, you should pick your parents with care, new research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology shows. A good working memory is perhaps the brain's most important system when it comes to learning a new language. But it appears that working memory is first and foremost determined by our genes. Whether you struggle to learn a new language, or find it relatively easy to learn, may be largely determined by "nature."
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Schools face shortage of digital curricula for English learners
Education Week
In California's Baldwin Park Unified School District , students just learning to speak English can use a combination of digital materials designed just for them, as well as general education software programs that allow teachers to adapt lessons to various learning levels. A student in the 14,500-student district might, for example, log on to BrainPOP ESL, an animated computer program that helps teach English-learners grammar and literacy. Or a student might use Voki, which allows students to create animated avatars that can speak using a student's recorded audio or listen to a digital voice that articulates text.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    How bilinguals switch between languages (Science Daily)
Study backs dual-language pre-Ks for ELLs (Education Week)
How bilinguals switch between languages (Science Daily)
Sequestration forces Indian land, military base schools to make drastic cuts (The Huffington Post)
School plans change for English language learners (South Coast Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Spending per student falls for first time ever
NBC News
The amount of money spent per public school student fell in 2011 for the first time since the Census Bureau began keeping records more than three decades earlier, as economic woes finally caught up with educational realities. The recession officially ran from December 2007 to June of 2009, but experts say there was some lag time before things like the housing bust began really hurting tax revenues, in turn crimping state and local budgets. In addition, the federal government's economic stimulus plan helped offset some of the initial tax revenue drops, so it took some time before state and local lawmakers had to tackle one of the least popular options: Cutting education funding.
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Educators worried summer school cut could hurt English language learners
Alaska Public Media
Normally, students in the Anchorage School District in Alaska would be starting summer school soon, but funding cuts have canceled the program for the first time in recent memory. The cuts will impact struggling students most — especially immigrant, refugee and other students learning English.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
Language is in our biology
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology via Science Daily
If you want to master languages, you should pick your parents with care, new research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology shows.

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Dual language programs prepare students for a global society
Daily Herald
Most kids get excited about pizza and cupcakes when their parents let them host birthday parties. Chase Dorn always preferred sushi and seaweed. The 15-year-old Conant High School sophomore wants to go into law and work for a Japanese company.

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Study backs dual-language pre-Ks for ELLs
Education Week
Young English language learners still developing oral and literacy skills in their home languages benefit most from early-childhood programs that regularly expose them to both languages.

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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword NABE.



School to transition to computer-based language learning
Williams News
In Arizona's Williams High School language classes, students may be learning French, German and Mandarin at the same time in the same classroom. That's because the school will begin offering language classes through Rosetta Stone, a computer program that offers 25 languages at five different levels. In the past, WHS offered two face-to-face language classes, Spanish I and Spanish II.
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Students who haven't mastered English are casualties of strict system
Orlando Sentinel
Time is running out for the kids in Melanie Gathers' English 3 class. The Dr. Phillips High students grew up speaking Spanish, Haitian Creole, French, Portuguese and Arabic. And they have only one year left to demonstrate mastery on tests given entirely in English if they hope to graduate on time. If they're like the students who came before them, many won't. Across Orange County, Fla., and the state, thousands of students such as those at Dr. Phillips are finding themselves lost in translation. They enter public school without fluency in English — and many never catch up.
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Picking up a second language is predicted by ability to learn patterns
Association for Psychological Science via Science Daily
Some people seem to pick up a second language with relative ease, while others have a much more difficult time. Now, a new study suggests that learning to understand and read a second language may be driven, at least in part, by our ability to pick up on statistical regularities. The study is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
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Federal ELL Clearinghouse remains in limbo
Education Week
The U.S. Department of Education's process to find a new contractor to manage the National Clearinghouse for English-Language Acquisition seems to be one without end. For the second time in the past six months, a protest of the department's contracting process has prompted agency officials to say they will hold a "do over" of sorts in their competition to award a $1.5 million contract for the clearinghouse, known best as NCELA. That decision means NCELA won't likely have a new contractor overseeing its operations until well into the summer. A spokesman for the Department of Education has not responded to my request to more fully explain the contracting situation.
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