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 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S COLUMN


NABE 1st Annual Dual Language Symposium

July 8-10
Ana G. Mendez University System, Wheaton, Maryland
Register Now

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Dear NABE Membership
NABE
The NABE Executive Board voting period to elect 3 At-Large positions has just began from May 27 thru June 17. You will be receiving a notice with instructions on how to access the NABE 2015 Election Web page and cast your confidential ballot. You may select 3 candidates only. Please open the link below to view the candidates and their statements. You may also visit the NABE Web page for additional information.

Si se puede!
Santiago Wood



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AFT, NABE, TESOL on Senate Bipartisan ESEA Bill
NABE
Leaders of three organizations representing the majority of educators who teach English language learners said they are encouraged by the Senate bipartisan Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization proposal. "The proposed bill represents a significant step forward to support the academic and language needs of ELLs, to adequately prepare teachers to work with ELLs, and to promote equity," said leaders of the American Federation of Teachers, the National Association for Bilingual Education and TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) International Association, in a statement to their members.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


45th Annual NABE Conference
March 3-5
Hilton Chicago

NABE
NABE's mission is to advocate for our nation's Bilingual and English Language Learners and families and to cultivate a multilingual multicultural society by supporting and promoting policy, programs, pedagogy, research and professional development that yield academic success, value native language, lead to English proficiency, and respects cultural and linguistic diversity.

NABE seeks proposals that engage participants in topics related to quality education for DLLs such as:
  • achieving educational equity for DLLs
  • ensuring social justice for DLLs through strong linguistic and academic attainment
  • providing equal educational opportunities for DLLs
By using a peer review process with a panel of over 35 reviewers from across the nation NABE ensures that all accepted proposals are of the highest quality for our attendees.

NABE invites all education experts, researchers, authors and successful practitioners with information of interest to submit a proposal. We also encourage multilingual proposals.

Click here to Submit your proposal. Proposal submission will be open through July 15.


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Request for proposal and participation
The 12th Annual ALAS Education Summit
Oct. 14-17

NABE
The Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents is an educational professional association advocating for Latino youth through professional development, interaction, and networking among administrators in school districts nationwide that serve Hispanic students. ALAS was formed in 2003 in response to the lack of national advocacy and representation by the existing mainstream professional associations. It is this void that ALAS seeks to fill with a determined effort to improve the educational success of Latino youth and career opportunities for Latino administrators. The ALAS mission is to provide leadership at the national level that assures every school in America effectively serves the educational needs of all students, with an emphasis on Latino youth, by building capacity, promoting best practices and transforming educational institutions.
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Selected recommendations on ESEA reauthorization regarding English language working group on ELL Policy
ELL Policy
English language learners comprise almost 10 percent of the U.S. student population at any given time. Many more students have been ELLs at some point in their schooling. In four states (Texas, New Mexico, Nevada and California) the percentages are significantly higher, ranging from 15 to 24 percent of the state's students. Moreover, many states in the Southeast and Midwest have experienced explosive ELL growth. Since the last re-­authorization of ESEA, the numbers of ELLs have increased substantially, and growth is more broadly distributed across the nation.
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It is now official!
NABE
Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signed the Biliteracy Certificate (includes Spanish and Portuguese) and Dual Language Immersion Program Senate Bill 267 that makes it now a State law. Indiana officially becomes the third state in the Midwest and 9th in the nation with a Seal of Biliteracy program.

Click here for the link of all the process we went through (click on "Bill Actions").

We are now blue on the Seal of Biliteracy national map and Indiana has started to reach national coverage on different mass media outlets.

Click here for the official press release from the Governor's Office.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Gwinnett County Public Schools - Metro Atlanta

GCPS has launched a Dual Language Immersion Program in 3 of our elementary schools.If you have the ability to demonstrate advanced mid-level language proficiency in French or Spanish on the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) Apply now!
 


Title III English Leaners FY16 Final
NABE
As the Subcommittee considers the Fiscal Year 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations bill, we respectfully urge you to provide the President's Budget request of $773.4 million for Title III Language Acquisition Grant, consistent with the considerable growth of English learners being served in our nation's public schools.
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Seal of Biliteracy Guidelines released
NABE
The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, the National Association of Bilingual Education, the National Council of State Supervisors for Languages, and TESOL International Association, have officially drafted recommendations for the implementation of the Seal of Biliteracy. The Seal of Biliteracy is an award made by a state department of education or local district to recognize a student who has attained proficiency in English and one or more other world languages by high school graduation. The recognition of attaining biliteracy becomes part of the high school transcript and diploma for these students.
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NABE 2017
Scheduled for Hilton Anatole, Dallas on Feb. 23-25 with Pre-Conference on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017.




IDRA José A. Cárdenas School Finance Fellows Program symposium proceedings released
IDRA
IDRA released the proceedings report of the IDRA José A. Cárdenas School Finance Fellows Program symposium focusing on education of English language learners. IDRA held the symposium, New Research on Securing Educational Equity and Excellence for English Language Learners in Texas Secondary Schools, in February 2015 in partnership with the Office of the President and the Center on Mexican American Studies and Research at Our Lady of the Lake University.
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 INDUSTRY NEWS


Play: Far more than purposeless activity
By: Debra Josephson Abrams
Some whisper, some laugh, some argue. They gesture wildly, demonstrate their ideas with their hands or drawings. From the air, from their minds, from their partners, they search for the English words they need. They are furiously engaged in play, and they have forgotten that I — the teacher — am in the room. It is just as education should be. As the final project in my ESL reading course for precollege students, I chose to have students create a game based on the novel we had read.
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Proposed changes to education act undermine civil-rights protections for new majority of students
Roll Call
This school year marks the first time in American history that students of color make up the majority of students in our nation's public schools. This year also marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The statute sought to create equal educational opportunities for disadvantaged students, particularly students of color, which had long been disregarded due to segregation and political disenfranchisement.
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Study: What's the best way to teach immigrant kids English?
Houston Chronicle
More than a third of students in the Houston Independent School District are not fluent in English. The best way to help them learn that language involves teaching them in their native tongue. That might seem counterintuitive to some, but it turns out native Spanish speakers have more success learning English when instructors continue to teach them Spanish as well. The findings are the result of a study by the Houston Education Research Consortium, a research partnership between HISD and the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University.
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What the Seal of Biliteracy can do for English language learners
EdCentral
A growing body of research has shown the potential — and considerable — cognitive, cultural and economic benefits of bilingualism. Meanwhile, similar research is showing the potentially damaging ramifications of English-only learning for English language learners. In a research study conducted by Ofelia Garcia, Jo Anne Kleifgen, and Lorraine Falchi for the Campaign for Educational Equity, ignoring students' emerging bilingualism creates considerable educational inequity.
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What's the top home language for ELLs?
Education Week
Spanish is not the top home language for English language learner students in some states, though it is the most commonly spoken native language for ELLs nationally, according to separate fact sheets by the Migration Policy Institute and Middlebury Interactive Languages. But the findings from the two groups diverge on several points. The brief from the Migration Policy Institute found that five states — Alaska, Hawaii, Maine, Montana and Vermont — have a language other than Spanish as the top language spoken by language learner students. The institute is a Washington-based research group.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ELL.


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Practices to welcome and support ELLs (Edutopia)
Unrealized advantages of dual language learning (LabRoots)
ELL writing skills: The challenges (By Douglas Magrath)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.



Analysis looks at English language learning students across the nation
Houston Chronicle
There's little surprise at the fact that most students in the K–12 age group who are learning to speak English in the United States are native Spanish speakers. This is mostly true in places a recent migration study points to as "traditional immigrant destinations," such as Texas, Florida and California. The report this month by the Migration Policy Institute looks at this and other data related to English language learners in the U.S. and ranks the "districts with the highest number and share of English language learners" in a new report.
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Research: Quick teacher-parent communications can reduce dropouts
THE Journal
A large but underused influence on student academic success in schools turns out to be parental communication. A new study done by researchers at Harvard University and Brown University found that a single individualized message sent weekly from a teacher to a parent documenting the student's performance in school was enough to reduce student failure by 41 percent. Students whose families received messages that focused on what they needed to improve in class were almost nine percentage points more likely to earn course credit. The majority of the participants, who came from numerous high schools in the district, were African American and Hispanic and spoke 10 different languages at home other than English. More than 80 percent qualified for free and reduced lunch and 22 percent were in special ed programs.
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In Oakland, Calif., struggling for years to learn English
NPR
When she was a toddler, Deyri Rabadan moved from Cuernavaca, Mexico, to Oakland, Calif., with her parents. She's been a California public school student since kindergarten. Now she's 17 years old and a senior at Coliseum College Prep Academy in Oakland. She's come a long way, but Rabadan, a native Spanish-speaker, says there's still one thing that embarrasses her: "I feel like if I speak up in class or I try to participate in class, other students are going to be like, 'What is she talking about?' You know?" Rabadan isn't alone in feeling that way. Four out of five high school students learning English in California have been in school in the state for longer than six years and still aren't fluent. They're what people in education call "long-term English learners."
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Teaching syllables can mask meaningful morphemes
Edutopia (commentary)
Kelli Sandman-Hurley, Ed.D., a contributor for Edutopia, writes: "Syllable division can mask morphological boundaries and thus hide the meaningful structures of words. Now there's a statement to think about. How many times have you seen the word every misspelled as 'evry?' What did you do to remedy the situation? I bet you over-pronounced the word to help the student perceive all of the written syllables — that's what most teachers do, myself included. English is not a syllable-timed language. It is a stress-timed language. This means that syllables bear little to no effect on our writing system. Our written language, like any written language, is meant to convey and record meaning, not just to represent phonemes with graphemes."
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NABE Weekly eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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