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 INDUSTRY NEWS

Languages other than English used in more U.S. homes, data show
Los Angeles Times
In California and across the country, more people are speaking Spanish, Korean or a slew of other languages besides English at home — a phenomenon that has historically set off heated debate about how immigrants will assimilate into American life. Yet in recent years, as other tongues became more common in American homes, people nationwide were no less likely to speak English with ease, a report by the U.S. Census Bureau shows. Scholars say slowing immigration has given rise to a more settled population of people born abroad.
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Apps for English language learning: Intro to photo editors
By Beth Crumpler
ESL instructors can use photo-editing apps for unconventional purposes, such as for instructional support, for learning outcomes or to bridge the gap between the classroom and home studies. Photo-editing apps can tremendously change how students see information and how they study. This is a quick introduction to basic photo-editing app features and how those features can be used by ESL instructors.
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Industry Pulse: Do you use photo-editing apps for ESL instruction?
ANSWER NOW


English language learners getting summer support
The Bulletin
Nashaly Diaz Silva knows what plants and animals are part of a desert ecosystem. She just doesn't know how to say it in English. Silva is one of a small group of Windham, Conn., students who arrived later in the year with little or no knowledge of English but would not have gotten the extra English language learner support over the summer because of her age. As a priority school district, Windham must provide summer school to all kindergarten through third-grade students who are not meeting grade-level requirements in reading. Silva and nine other fourth- and fifth-graders would have been left out of the mix in recent years.
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SHOWCASE
  Help Denver change the future

At CMS Community School in Denver, CO we need educators with a passion for developing bi-literate, multicultural students. A dual-language school located in Southwest Denver, we are striving to help Spanish-, Vietnamese-, and English-speaking students learn and excel in Spanish and English. Learn more about the opportunities at CMS here.
 


ELL advocates call for PARCC tests in Spanish
Education Week
A tricky issue facing both groups of states designing common tests for English/language arts and mathematics is whether to make native-language assessments available for students who are still learning English. Neither the Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers nor the Smarter Balanced consortia has publicly announced what it will do about native-language translations of the new tests. Both groups have member states with vastly different approaches to testing English language learners. Arizona, for example, is an "English-only" member state in PARCC, while a fellow member, New York, requires that assessments be made available in multiple languages for students still learning English.
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The vocabulary imperative: Not just 'more' words, but more functional words
Education Week Teacher
Words. Schools are swimming in them. Children are swimming in them too, and potentially drowning in them. A recent Education Week article discussed the need for students to "learn more words," stating that "[v]ocabulary is a deceptively simple literacy skill, but [one] which has proved frustratingly difficult to address."

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Language wars: Should Spanish-speaking students be taught in English only?
PBS
There's long been debate about bilingual education in the United States and what's the most effective way to make sure students are proficient in academics in the English language.

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Closing the vocabulary gap
Language Magazine
One promise of public education is to level the playing field across the socioeconomic and ethnic spectrum. Unfortunately, the system is not fulfilling that promise. The achievement gap has been an issue for decades, and it's getting worse.

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Social status and power of action of speakers determine the way their statements are perceived
Universität Mainz via Science Daily
The actual standing of speakers within a society's power structure determines how their statements are perceived. This is the conclusion reached in a joint study undertaken by neurolinguist Professor Ina Bornkessel-Schlesewsky of the University of Marburg and linguist Professor Matthias Schlesewsky of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz with the support of Sylvia Krauspsenhaar, who participated in the study as a member of the Neurotypology research group at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig.
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How many hours does it take to be fluent in English?
BBC News
There are plenty of people in the U.K. for whom even basic English is a problem. According to the Census, 726,000 people in England and Wales said they could not speak English well, and another 138,000 said they did not speak it at all. Ling, 40, who arrived five years ago from China, found it difficult to learn English. "When I came here I was pregnant and so I was at home for the next three years. It took me longer to learn as I was very busy with the children." Eventually she was able to begin taking classes and now speaks good conversational English.
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Child's play
Language Magazine
The field of computer-assisted language learning has been blossoming in recent decades. As a college language professor, I diligently attend conference presentations on the use of tech tools to enhance language learning. In fact, in the 2012 convention program for the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, 207 sessions were identified as relating to technology, representing about one quarter of the 788 sessions available. The bulk of these sessions tend to focus on tech use within the secondary or post-secondary language classroom; however, tech tools are increasingly being used in early language programs as well. Ideas and suggestions abound, but what is happening in the trenches of elementary school language programs? What considerations are made by teachers when choosing to integrate — or avoid — technology in their language-learning classroom?
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    No Child Left Behind is out, what's next? (The Washington Post)
PARCC releases additional guidance on ELL, special education students (eSchool News)
How bilinguals switch between languages (Science Daily)
Dropout indicators found for 1st graders (Education Week)
Arizona revives Mexican-American studies program (NPR)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Centers throughout the brain work together to make reading possible
University of Southern California via Science Daily
A combination of brain scans and reading tests has revealed that several regions in the brain are responsible for allowing humans to read. The findings open up the possibility that individuals who have difficulty reading may only need additional training for specific parts of the brain — targeted therapies that could more directly address their individual weaknesses.
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The vocabulary imperative: Not just 'more' words, but more functional words
Education Week Teacher
Words. Schools are swimming in them. Children are swimming in them too, and potentially drowning in them. A recent Education Week article discussed the need for students to "learn more words," stating that "[v]ocabulary is a deceptively simple literacy skill, but [one] which has proved frustratingly difficult to address." Indeed, a researcher cited in the article said she'd found "a very haphazard approach" to teaching vocabulary in schools — "vocabulary choices were not based on frequency, not based on the supporting academic words children need to know," nor were they based "content-rich words."
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