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Home   Research   Advocacy   Publications   Conference   Press Room   About Us   Join   NABE Store Aug. 15, 2013


Great Teachers Wanted: Multiple Languages


French, Spanish, Chinese, and ELL needed to teach
in our diverse schools in Baton Rouge, Louisiana
ebrschools.org

 




 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S COLUMN

Dear NABE members:
NABE
The NABE Journal for Research and Practice is accepting manuscripts for publication until Aug. 31. Volume 5 will be published in time to coincide with the 43rd annual NABE international conference to be held in San Diego, Feb. 12-15.

Please follow the steps below:

1. Send your manuscripts to: Xin Wang and Mariella Espinoza-Herold.

2. Visit the Journals' website.

3. Check out the guidelines for submission here.

Thank You,
The National Association for Bilingual Education


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 INDUSTRY NEWS


A look at ELL performance so far on Common Core aligned tests
Education Week
Student performance on New York's new Common Core aligned tests was weak across the board, as results confirmed the low expectations that education officials in that state had been steeling the public for over the last several months. Statewide, the proficiency rates in English/language arts sank from 55.1 percent on the non-Common Core aligned exams from the 2011-2012 school year, to 31.1 percent on the Common Core aligned tests given this past spring. In math, the proficiency rates fell from 64.8 percent to 31 percent.
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SHOWCASE
  Help Denver change the future

At CMS Community School in Denver, CO we need educators with a passion for developing bi-literate, multicultural students. A dual-language school located in Southwest Denver, we are striving to help Spanish-, Vietnamese-, and English-speaking students learn and excel in Spanish and English. Learn more about the opportunities at CMS here.
 


Complaint: Florida schools' race-based achievement goals discriminate
Miami Herald
Setting less ambitious academic achievement goals for black and Hispanic students in Florida is discriminatory, according to a civil rights complaint filed with the U.S. Department of Justice. The complaint filed by the Southern Poverty Law Center asked the federal Department of Justice to look into the standardized testing goals of the Florida Department of Education and the state Board of Education. The complaint alleges that Florida education officials have set less ambitious test result goals for black and Hispanic students compared to white and Asian students.
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Chinese students coming to US middle schools? It's starting to happen.
The Christian Science Monitor
Peggy Wang has lived in China her entire life. A successful, English-speaking executive, she frequently travels abroad for work, but never imagined that her most recent itinerary would include dropping off her 15-year-old daughter at a prestigious boarding school outside Washington. While there is a long history of Chinese students pursuing advanced degrees abroad, especially in the United States, Wang's daughter, Susan Li, is part of a rapidly growing trend in which Chinese students are choosing to seek their education overseas as early as middle school or high school.
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School district to focus on early literacy and language skills
Santa Cruz Sentinel
Kindergarten is not just about playtime and social skills. Students are expected to learn sight words, letters and numbers at a fast pace. This year, the Soquel Unified Elementary School District in California is taking creative steps to set up students for early success by adding another class of transitional kindergarten and expanding a language and literacy software program to more students.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
1st day of school offers challenges for English language learners
Lincoln Journal Star
First-day-of-school jitters take on a whole new meaning in Valerie Brown's classroom at Park Middle School in Nebraska. Just like everybody else wandering Park's hallways, Brown's students spent their first day trying to figure out where they were going and who was in their class, how to open their lockers and navigate the lunchroom.

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Child's play
Language Magazine
The field of computer-assisted language learning has been blossoming in recent decades. As a college language professor, I diligently attend conference presentations on the use of tech tools to enhance language learning.

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How many hours does it take to be fluent in English?
BBC News
There are plenty of people in the U.K. for whom even basic English is a problem. According to the Census, 726,000 people in England and Wales said they could not speak English well, and another 138,000 said they did not speak it at all.

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Apps that snap and tools that rule
Langauge Magazine
The old adage "the best things in life are free" has never been truer than in the world of Web-based tools and apps that are useful in the language classroom. As computers and mobile devices become an increasingly valued, accepted and expected part of language classes, the number, variety, and value of free online tools and apps continue to grow. (The distinction between an app and a tool in this article is that an app is a resource that is downloadable and used only on a mobile phone or tablet and not on a computer or laptop.) The following Web-based tools and apps are all free and have the potential to enhance any language lesson.
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Obama administration aloof as lawmakers tangle over ESEA
Education Week
Not since passage of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2001 has Congress been so outwardly engaged in K-12 policy, yet most advocates remain pessimistic that there will be a new version of the flagship federal education law anytime soon. A big part of the reason: The Obama administration has little incentive to see a bill to revise the Elementary and Secondary Education Act advance in the current legislative climate, in which lawmakers seem more likely to erode, rather than support, the president's policy priorities. Congress has been working on two highly partisan ESEA bills — one of which, the GOP-backed House measure, President Barack Obama has threatened to veto.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ESEA.




Relief tally for undocumented youths after 1 year of deferred action
Education Week
It's been nearly a year since the Obama administration began its deferred action program that gives eligible undocumented youth who were brought to the United States as children temporary relief from deportation and a shot at work authorization. As of the end of June, roughly 400,000 people had been granted the status. So, as the first anniversary of the deferred action policy comes this week, who has applied? Who's been approved? Where do they live? And what possible factors are keeping more potential beneficiaries from seeking the relief?
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1st day of school offers challenges for English language learners
Lincoln Journal Star
First-day-of-school jitters take on a whole new meaning in Valerie Brown's classroom at Park Middle School in Nebraska. Just like everybody else wandering Park's hallways, Brown's students spent their first day trying to figure out where they were going and who was in their class, how to open their lockers and navigate the lunchroom. But they couldn't ask for help, at least not in English.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Apps for English language learning: Intro to photo editors (By Beth Crumpler)
Languages other than English used in more U.S. homes, data show (Los Angeles Times)
Language wars: Should Spanish-speaking students be taught in English only? (PBS)
Closing the vocabulary gap (Language Magazine)
The vocabulary imperative: Not just 'more' words, but more functional words (Education Week Teacher)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Just how effective are the Common Core State Standards?
eSchool News
With all the hype about the Common Core State Standards, it's easy to forget that some states have decided not to adopt the standards–plus, some adopting states are now re-evaluating their decisions. Now, a new infographic questions some of the basic tenets of the Common Core State Standards. Perhaps one of the biggest arguments against the standards, according to the infographic, is that "while core curriculum has improved performance in states with traditionally good education systems," states that have struggled academically wonder if the standards are more a one-size-fits-all pathway instead of a "great equalizing force," in which the common standards bridge a gap between vocational education and the university pathway.
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The story deepens
Harvard Gazette
At East Bosto'’s McKay School, Brianna Guilford led her class of tin men, cowardly lions, Dorothys, and scarecrows into the sunlight. "We're reading 'The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,' the original story, and they're exploring and interpreting the story through the creative arts using a program called Pre-Texts," she said, as the students ran outside. Having created masks and costumes inspired by the L. Frank Baum story, the children were seeking a real-world setting related to the chapter they were reading, as a way to deepen their connection with the characters and story. The activity wasn't just for fun, but was meant to help the students, for whom English is a second language, become stronger readers and English speakers. In addition, "Oz" is a fourth-grade-level text — well above the supposed reading level of Guilford's second-graders.
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