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Home   Research   Advocacy   Publications   Conference   Press Room   About Us   Join   NABE Store October 30, 2014

 



 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S COLUMN

NABE 44th Annual Conference Achieving Global Competence:
Biliteracy for All

NABE
The National Association for Bilingual Education is the only nationwide network of professionals dedicated to serving English language learners in the United States via education programs and legislative advocacy. For the past four decades, NABE has been committed to excellence in bilingual and biliteracy education for all students through enriched educational programs and intensive professional development for teachers, administrators, professors, policymakers and parents. Additionally, NABE provides extensive research in the field via its Bilingual Research Journal, NABE Perspectives, NABE Journal of Research and Practice and the NABE eNews. NABE is committed to promoting programs and innovations that prepare our nation's students to be fluently bilingual, technologically creative, globally competitive and well-rounded world citizens by advancing legislation and policies at both the state and national levels that best serve language minority students.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Soy bilingüe. Soy listo. Estoy listo.

More and more kids are becoming fluent for life thanks to Imagine Learning Español, an educational software solution that helps young students increase Spanish language and literacy proficiency. To get a better look at the program—and how it's helping early learners build a stronger foundation—click here.
 


NABE 2015 Registration
NABE
Sponsor Packages
NABE offers five levels of value-filled special conference sponsorship rate packages. Sponsorship packages include advertising opportunities, premium exhibit hall locations, complimentary conference registrations, and much more. Make the most of the NABE Conference. Register as a sponsor and help NABE ensure greater opportunities for all educators and students.

Exhibitor Benefits include:
  • Dedicated exhibit viewing hours
  • Live entertainment in the exhibit hall
  • Exhibitor Directory in Conference Program
  • Breakfast and Coffee Breaks
  • Private lounge during exhibit hours and hall security during closed hours
  • Lead Retrieval Available
Click here to purchase program advertisements.

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Educational Leadership Awards Luncheon
NABE
Recognizing educators and organizations that have made a difference in the lives of Florida's bilingual learners and their families.
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 INDUSTRY NEWS


Summarizing the research on dual language learners
EdCentral
It's impossible to have a conversation about dual language learners in the United States without being drawn into questions about their "difference," and just how much it should be taken into account at school. For years, English-only advocates have argued that these differences should be ignored or erased, that we need to educate DLLs much as we educate monolingual English students — with English instruction.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword LANGUAGE.


What we talk about when we talk about best practices: Types of curricula
By Debra Josephson Abrams
In Part 1 of this series on best practices in ESL programs, we looked at the overwhelming research that supports integrated curricula. Today, we will look at two types of integrated curricula: theme-based learning and culture-based curriculum. If you are revising your ESL curriculum or are establishing a new program, or if you are a teacher interested in teaching for a best practices program or a student eager to study in a best practices program, it is clearly advisable to consider a curriculum that is theme-based and/or culture-based.
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Strong vocabulary protects against cognitive decline
Psych Central
New research suggests a robust vocabulary may reduce mild cognitive impairment and lead to a lower risk of developing dementia. Mild cognitive impairment or incipient dementia is a condition that some people develop as they age. Many experts believe it is an intermediate state between normal cognition and dementia. MCI is defined as cognitive decline greater than expected for an individual's age and education level but that does not interfere notably with activities of daily life. Symptoms often include forgetfulness and a decline in executive skills.
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Support for bilingual education grows as population shifts
Austin American-Statesman
The Lake Travis school district in Texas implemented two new programs this semester designed to increase the success of Spanish-speaking students. Hispanic students account for almost 20 percent of the student population of the Lake Travis school district. Because the majority of Spanish-speaking families live within the attendance zone of Lake Travis Elementary, the school is home to the district's newly implemented dual language program, the Gomez and Gomez Enrichment Model, applicable from pre-K until fifth grade. The program is designed to make students proficient in reading in speaking in both English and Spanish by the time they complete the program.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Bilingual children 'show advantage' in noisy classrooms (BBC)
Providing feedback to English learners: Why, when and how (By: Erick Herrmann)
Why Florida is fighting the US Education Department over English learners (Stateline Impact)
School successes inspire North Carolina push for dual language (Education Week)
Cutting to the Common Core: Sticking to the script (Language Magazine)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


3 hidden costs for international students at US colleges
U.S. News & World Report
International students preparing to attend college in the U.S. cannot avoid considering their budget. But there's more to consider than your future tuition, room and board or textbook fees. You already know these kinds of costs and probably have a plan to get scholarships to cover them at best, or you're at least aware of them. Instead, I would like to tell you about the following college costs that many international students only realize they'll have to account for once they set foot in the U.S.
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Pleasure of learning new words
Universidad de Barcelona via Science Daily
From our very first years, we are intrinsically motivated to learn new words and their meanings. First language acquisition occurs within a permanent emotional interaction between parents and children. However, the exact mechanism behind the human drive to acquire communicative linguistic skills is yet to be established.
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Three decades after order, Denver schools still struggle to teach English
The Denver Post
Three decades after federal courts ordered Denver Public Schools to better serve English learners, its efforts remain plagued by inconsistencies and a large number of students who haven't shown progress in learning the language. The district is two years into its latest plan to educate English learners, who make up nearly 35 percent of the district's 90,000 students. But based on the most recent annual tests, nearly one in three of the district's English learners who have been in the system for the past two years failed to make progress on their English skills.
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How standing desks can help students focus in the classroom
MindShift
The rise of the standing desk may appear to be a response to the modern, eat-at-your-desk, hunched-over worker chained to her computer, but history paints a different picture: Hemingway, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson all stood while they worked. Donald Rumsfeld had a standing desk, and so did Charles Dickens. Workplaces are moving toward more standing desks, but schools have been slower to catch on for a variety of reasons, including cost, convenience, and perhaps the assumption that "sit down and pay attention" is the best way to learn.
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Class helps students with their sewing and their English
Pioneer Press
Margarita Garcia smiled broadly as she showed off a small cloth bag that could hold pencils, makeup or a cellphone. It looks deceptively simple, but to create it she had to learn to make a lining and put in a zipper. Luckily, those are skills she mastered in a new course for adults who want to improve both their English and their sewing skills.
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NABE Weekly eNews
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Hailey Golden, Senior Education Editor, 469.420.2630   
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