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Obama wins 2nd term as president
Educaiton Week    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
President Barack Obama — who pushed through an unprecedented windfall of education funding in his first term and spurred states to make widespread changes to K-12 policy through competitive grants — has been re-elected, the Associated Press reported tonight. Although school issues were a major focus of the president's first four years in office, he did not outline a particularly robust second-term agenda for education during a campaign dominated largely by the economy. As the Democratic standard-bearer, he reiterated a pledge, made earlier this year, to recruit and train 100,000 new math and science teachers, but otherwise steered clear of trumpeting new initiatives. Instead, he focused on the differences between his record and that of former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, his Republican rival, on education funding. More



 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S COLUMN


Bilingual Education: Magic Happens!!
NABE    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Local contact: Nilda M. Aguirre at nildaaguirre.nabe2013@gmail.com or (225) 209-0224
What: 42nd Annual International Bilingual Education Conference
Where: Disney's Coronado Springs Resort, Lake Buena Vista, Fla.
When: Feb. 7-9

Dear NABE members,

Mark your calendars — NABE is pleased to invite you to be a part of Bilingual Education: Magic Happens!! NABE's 42nd Annual Conference will be held at the Disney's Coronado Springs Resort, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., on Feb. 7-9. This event is to bring awareness to the magic behind Bilingual Education. It will be a week filled with educational speakers, exhibitors, sponsors, vendors, music, raffles, prizes, demonstrations, cutting edge presentations of all sorts and so much rich research, best practices in dual language and bilingual education, the new education wave on common core state standards, ESEA flexibility waivers, special interest group research and more.

Keynote speakers for this event include Dr. Alberto Carvalho, superintendent of Dade County Public Schools, Dr. Kenji Hakuta, professor from Stanford University, Dr. Ofelia Garcia from the Graduate Center City University of New York and Dr. Andrew Cohen from University of Minnesota.

We are thrilled to have with us featured speakers Dr. Catherine Snow, professor from Harvard University, Dr. Laurie Olsen, director of the Sobrato Early Academic Literacy Program, Shelly Spiegel-Coleman, executive director from Californians Together, Dr. Jim Cummins from Ontario Institute of Education, Tony Miller, deputy secretary from DOE, and Okhee Lee Salwen, Miriam Eisenstein Ebsworth and Lixing (Frank) Tang from NYU Steinhardt, N.Y.

Submit your proposals now

Click here to submit your proposal for the NABE 2013 Conference.
All proposals must be submitted by Sept. 12.
See attachment for more information on the conference or visit the NABE website: http://www.nabe.org/


Statement from HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on National Native American Heritage Month
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Each November we celebrate National Native American Heritage Month — the history, culture, and character of American Indian and Alaska Native people. This year's theme, "Native Families Moving Ahead: Together We Strengthen Our Nations," speaks to the importance of continuing on the path to a healthier future for all American families. More



Report: Scrap 1-size-fits-all approach to teaching ELLs
Education Week    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
As more and more school districts around the country put the common standards in English/language arts and mathematics into practice, one refrain is growing louder and louder: Instruction for English learners must change radically. Of course, the instructional shifts required in the common core are significant for all students, but for the nation's large — and growing — population of English learners, traditional approaches of teaching them the language by emphasizing grammar and syntax, for example, have to give way to instruction that allows ELLs to understand content, think critically and communicate ideas — even if imperfectly. More

Mentor program proves it has merit
The San Diego Union-Tribune    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
A pained expression crossed Elizabeth Covarrubias' face. The 16-year-old junior had just turned to a chapter in her geometry textbook titled "Indirect Proof and Inequality in One Triangle. I'm having trouble with geometry," Covarrubias said. "My mom said I had to come here." "Here" is the cafeteria, which, for an hour after school every Thursday, is transformed into a giant study hall for the Titan Academic Assistance Program or TAAP. The peer program pairs underclassmen — specifically, English learners, the socioeconomically disadvantaged and students with disabilities who need coursework help — with other students, typically upperclassmen, who are eager to mentor. More

Teaching in multicultural classrooms: tips, challenges and opportunities
The Guardian    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
What does a range of nationalities in class bring to the teaching and learning experience? A collection of teachers give us a glimpse into their multicultural classrooms. More

Teachers concerned about students' online research skills
eSchool News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Teachers are concerned that students are a little too quick to turn to Google and other internet search engines for answers: That's one finding of a Pew Research Center survey of more than 2,000 teachers nationwide queried about students' digital research habits. On the other hand, Rainie said, it means that students are prioritizing that information in a way that might not give them access to all the high-quality and relevant stuff that would be useful. More

Teacher absence as a leading indicator of student achievement
Center for American Progress    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
On any given school day, up to 40 percent of teachers in New Jersey's Camden City Public Schools are absent from their classrooms. Such a high figure probably would not stand out in parts of the developing world, but it contrasts sharply with the 3 percent national rate of absence for full-time wage and salaried American workers, and the 5.3 percent rate of absence for American teachers overall. Certainly, it isn't unreasonable for Camden residents to expect lower rates of teacher absence, particularly when the district annually spends top dollar — more than $22,000 per pupil — to educate its students. And advocates for students of color, who constitute 99.5 percent of the district's enrollment, could potentially use these new data from the Department of Education to support a civil rights complaint. More

Rethinking reading instruction
ScienceDaily    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Many educators have long believed that when words differ on only one sound, early readers can learn the rules of phonics by focusing on what is different between the words. This is thought to be a critical gateway to reading words and sentences. But scientists at the University of Iowa are turning that thinking on its head. A recent study published in Developmental Psychology shows certain kinds of variation in words may help early readers learn better. When children see the same phonics regularities, embedded in words with more variation, they may learn these crucial early reading skills better. What might appear to make learning a more difficult task — learning about letter-sound relationships from words with more variation — actually leads to better learning. More

Teachers: Technology changing how students learn
The New York Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
There is a widespread belief among teachers that students' constant use of digital technology is hampering their attention spans and ability to persevere in the face of challenging tasks, according to two surveys of teachers. The researchers note that their findings represent the subjective views of teachers and should not be seen as definitive proof that widespread use of computers, phones and video games affects students' capability to focus. Even so, the researchers who performed the studies, as well as scholars who study technology's impact on behavior and the brain, say the studies are significant because of the vantage points of teachers, who spend hours a day observing students. More

Maryland voters approve in-state tuition for undocumented students
Education Week    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Undocumented immigrant students will be eligible for in-state tuition at public colleges and universities in Maryland after voters there overwhelmingly ratified a state law at the polls. With 84 percent of precincts reporting just before midnight, 58 percent of voters answered "yes" on Question 4, while 42 percent voted against the measure that grants in-state tuition rates to undocumented students, the Associated Press reported. Maryland voters were the first in the nation to go to the polls to weigh in on a statewide measure that will lower the financial barrier to higher education for undocumented students who came to the United States as children and meet certain conditions. More

LAUSD parent centers aim to boost involvement at schools
Los Angeles Times    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
At Gault Street Elementary in California, waves of parents flow through the campus daily. Sometimes the tide is stronger, said parent center director Rosalva Waterford, but they are always there. Volunteers make copies for the teachers using one of the center's three copy machines — including the one they call la viejita (the old woman) a decades-old, yellowing behemoth that frequently gets passed over for the newer models. Parents sometimes help move classroom furniture for an activity or clean up afterward. Centers like the one at Gault in Lake Balboa offer free classes that focus on parents' needs, from helping their children with their homework to learning English. More

Cutting to the Common Core: Disrupting discourse
Language Magazine    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The Common Core State Standards rolling out in 46 states aim to graduate all U.S. high school students with 21st century communication and literacy skills, career and college ready. These new national standards signal a pronounced shift in how academic language and literacy instruction must be approached. More


 

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