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 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S COLUMN

43rd Annual NABE Conference — Feb. 12-15
NABE
Sailing into the 21st Century: Multiple Languages. Multiple Paths. Lifelong Advantages.

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 INDUSTRY NEWS


Bilingual children make critical gains in early education programs
WUNC-FM
A review by UNC-Chapel Hill researchers confirms that children who speak two languages make greater gains in early education programs than their peers who speak only English. Scientists at UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute reviewed 25 studies and found that children with low English-language abilities greatly benefit from early childhood programs like Head Start and state-funded Pre-K.
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How PISA results will impact US schools
eClassroom News
International PISA test results can help guide U.S. schools, experts say. Much debate has focused on the role of international rankings and assessments in U.S. education. Experts say U.S. education leaders can use data about top performing countries to inform U.S. education practice. One such test is the PISA, an international study launched in 1997 that assesses 15-year-olds in reading, math, and science every three years in an effort to evaluate worldwide education systems. PISA results will be made public on International PISA Day, which takes place on Dec. 3.
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Dual-language learning for all students is visionary
The Voice of Tucson
Being visionary didn't work for Arizona. Being reactionary was a bust, too. It's time to apply some hard-nosed realism to the fact that our schools are not serving a population of kids who are fast becoming the majority of K-12 students. Ironically, we still call them minority kids. They aren't. Latinos make up 60 percent to 70 percent of students in the Tucson Unified School District, and 44 percent of public-school kids statewide.
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Ontario, Ore., seeing success for English language learners
The Argus Observer
At first glance, Ontario, Ore., high school teacher Jerry Maldonado's classroom looks pretty ordinary. Posters of prefixes and suffixes, Greek and Latin root words adorn the walls. A projector displays grammar exercises on the white board. Students copy vocabulary words into their notebooks — contemplate, designate, implement and procrastinate. But when Maldonado asks her students to define their words and use them in sentences, some of the students struggle and Maldonado prompts them in Spanish, making it apparent that this isn't a typical English class.
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Bilingual children make critical gains in early education programs
WUNC-FM
A review by UNC-Chapel Hill researchers confirms that children who speak two languages make greater gains in early education programs than their peers who speak only English. Scientists at UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute reviewed 25 studies and found that children with low English-language abilities greatly benefit from early childhood programs like Head Start and state-funded Pre-K.

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ESL teachers, academic language and the Common Core State Standards
Education Week (commentary)
Making the rigorous Common Core State Standards in English/language arts and mathematics accessible to every type of learner is a huge undertaking for educators. In a new special report called Moving Beyond the Mainstream, three of my Education Week colleagues and I try to tackle some of the most central challenges to that endeavor.

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Language gap in the US is a problem, opportunity
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
There's a joke among linguists: If you speak two languages, you're bilingual. If you speak one, you're American. The joke isn't funny, though, at a time when the number of Chinese with familiarity in English matches the entire population of the U.S., and when officials warn that America's "national language gap" is a major competitiveness handicap.

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Common Core academic standards force teachers to work on critical thinking over memorization
The Associated Press via Fox News
Remembering the plot of a short story is no longer good enough in teacher Amy Lawson's fifth-grade classroom. Today's students are being asked to think more critically. For example, what might a character say in an email to a friend? "It's hard. But you can handle this," Lawson tells them. Welcome to a classroom using the Common Core State Standards, one of the most politicized and misunderstood changes in education for students and their teachers in kindergarten through high school.
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How virtual games can help struggling students learn
U.S. News & World Report
It seems like kids do everything online these days — and school is no exception. More and more, educators are taking advantage of digital advances to supplement their teaching in the classroom, and are seeing encouraging results. This is especially the case for certain subgroups of students that typically struggle academically, such as English language learners and special education students.
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Dual-immersion language program a big hit at elementary school
The Beach Reporter
On the first day of school this year at Washington Elementary in Redondo Beach, Calif., two classes of kindergartners — a strong majority of them English-only speakers — were introduced to a teacher who spoke only in Spanish. Ever since, every subject they've been taught this year — from reading to math to social studies — has been delivered in Spanish. This includes even lessons about American icons, such as the bald eagle.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword DUAL LANGUAGE.


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    From second language learning to bilingualism in schools (Psychology Today)
Researchers map brain areas vital to understanding language (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign via Science Daily)
Which states are most vulnerable to K-12 sequester cuts? (Education Week)
Sex of speaker affects listener language processing (University of Kansas via Science Daily)
Lack of national uniformity in ELL instruction a challenge (KJZZ)

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UCLA study funded by Eva Longoria IDs factors that improve educational outcomes for Latinas
UCLA Newsroom
Young Latinas who have Latina and Latino teachers and counselors as role models and who are involved in extracurricular activities in high school have a much better chance of educational success, according to a new research report from the Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles at UCLA's Graduate School of Education and Information Studies.
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Special report: Learning a language online
eSchool News
In tiny Weybridge, Vt., the most common industry is farming. Yet the fifty or so students in the town's K-6 elementary school are preparing for a much larger world of opportunities by learning a second language. With just four full-time teachers at Weybridge Elementary, that poses a challenge. The school does have a part-time Spanish teacher who comes in three days a week, says Principal Christina Johnston — but it's an online curriculum developed by Middlebury Interactive Languages, in collaboration with faculty from nearby Middlebury College, that is helping to fill the gap.
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Straight outta ESL class: Learning English by learning slang
Public Radio International
Donald Chung stood in front of his classmates at the UCLA Extension school and started to throw a fit — well, as much as the mild–mannered student from Taiwan could muster. "I don't know what he's trying to pull," Chung said. "The guy's a total flake!" His friend Jiu Hua Zhang chimed in: "You said it!" The students had spent a good portion of the class practicing these expressions as part of their "street talk" course. In many foreign countries, English classes start as early as preschool. But thousands of students still come to the U.S. to get what they can't get back home: the idioms, the catchphrases — the slang.
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